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3.

Nobelity

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A look at the world's most pressing problems through the eyes of Nobel laureates. Follow filmmaker Turk Pipkin in his journey to find enlightening answers about the kind of world our children and grandchildren will know.
DVD
2006; 2005
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

The New Rulers of the World: A Special Report

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John Pilger looks at how globalization has increased the gap between the very rich and the very poor. In particular he looks at Indonesia as an example of how globalization and corrupt government has thrown millions of people into poverty and how multinational corporations support the abuse of these poor workers in sweatshops.
DVD
2001
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

Investigating the Mind: Exchanges Between Buddhism and the Biobehavioral Sciences on How the Mind Works

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In 1987, recognizing that there was no orderly way for science and Buddhism to share their findings, the Mind and Life Institute was started with the Dalai Lama. Over the next 10 years, the Institute organized weeklong scientific meetings between the Dalai Lama and world-renowned scientists, consisting of presentations and in-depth discussions on various topics of interest to both systems.
DVD
2003
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

The New Rulers of the World: A Special Report

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Examines the ways in which globalization has increased the gap between the very rich and the very poor. In particular he looks at Indonesia as an example of how globalization and corrupt government has thrown millions of people into poverty and how multinational corporations support the abuse of these poor workers in sweatshops.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Global Politics [electronic resource]: U.S. And the World

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Examines the need for the United States to use the tools of foreign policy in ways that recognize the growing interdependence of nations, implementing both traditional and new forms of military, trade, and diplomatic strategies to promote benefits for America and the world as a whole. Examples include the controversy over America's participation in Operation Endeavor in Bosnia-Herzegovia, the use of international trade as an instrument of U.S. foreign policy in South Korea, and Jody William's creation of a non-governmental organization to globally ban the use of landmines.
Online
2003
8.

Refugee Resettlement in Australia [electronic resource]: Boat Crossing to Malaysia

In the first episode of Go Back to Where You Came From, our six participants begin their refugee odyssey. After being stripped of their cell phones, identification, and money, the group is sent to live for a few days with a family from Iraq and a family from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, each of whom are struggling to put the terrors of the past behind them as they make a fresh start in Australia. Afterward, the group visits the notorious Villawood Immigration Detention Centre - and then begins the perilous journey to unknown shores in a leaky boat.
Online
2011
9.

Refugee Camp in Kenya [electronic resource]: Refugee Slum in Jordan ; Baghdad, Iraq ; Goma, DRC

In the third episode of Go Back to Where You Came From, two of our group leave Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya for Goma in strife-torn Democratic Republic of Congo. Escorted by UN peacekeepers, they see firsthand the dangers of life in a country where murder is commonplace and a thousand women are raped every day. Meanwhile, three of our group travel to Amman, Jordan, to view an emergency hospital and a refugee slum before heading to the infamous Red Zone of Baghdad, Iraq - a trip requiring flak vests, helmets, and a U.S. Army escort. The program concludes with our six participants reunited in Australia, where they reflect upon some of the lessons they've learned.
Online
2011
10.

Refugee Slum in Malaysia [electronic resource]: Refugee Camp in Kenya

In Malaysia - a common stop on the dangerous path to a new life in Australia - 100,000 people live in illegal refugee slums. In the second episode of Go Back to Where You Came From, our six participants spend several days living with 50 Burmese refugees in a small, one-bathroom apartment. In addition, the group goes on a border patrol in an effort to hunt down human smugglers and participates in a large-scale midnight raid on a construction site to capture illegal immigrants who live and work there. The show concludes with three of the group pressing on to northern Kenya, where they register as refugees at a huge UN-managed camp called simply Kakuma: "Nowhere.
Online
2011
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Paddy Ashdown - the Global Power Shift

Paddy Ashdown claims that we are living in a moment in history where power is changing in ways it never has before. In a spellbinding TEDTalk he outlines the three major global shifts that he sees coming. Ashdown is a former member of the British Parliament and a diplomat with a lifelong commitment to international cooperation.
Online
2012
12.

Yellow Wasps [electronic resource]: Anatomy of a War Crime

In this classic program Serbian journalist Jovan Dulovic investigates the 1992 ethnic cleansing of a Bosnian Muslim city by the Yellow Wasps, a Serbian paramilitary group, and the subsequent war-crimes tribunal that failed to hold the Yellow Wasps responsible. Survivors of the attack offer their recollections of what happened, while the Yellow Wasps' leader says that Muslim extremists provoked the Serbs' violent assaults against the Bosnians. The weak response of the international community to reports of Serbian-controlled concentration camps is also examined, with commentary from former UN Special envoy José Maria Mendiluce and others.
Online
1996
13.

Much Ado in Mostar [electronic resource]: A Shakespearean Collaboration

The medieval city of Mostar was the site of some of the bloodiest fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina's early 1990s war. An important multicultural center, Mostar became segregated along ethnic lines-Muslims in the east and Catholics in the west-with the division fiercely enforced by inflammatory government rhetoric. This program profiles a group of 15- to 21-year-olds from both sides of Mostar who overcome nationalistic differences to stage Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing, with the help of Dartmouth College education professor Andrew Garrod. As Garrod guides them through rehearsals, the young actors talk about living with the legacy of the Bosnian War and their hopes for a new spirit of unity in Mostar.
Online
2010
14.

My Land [electronic resource]: Seeing Both Sides of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Born to a Moroccan Muslim father and a Tunisian Jewish mother, filmmaker Nabil Ayouch spent his childhood hearing divergent views about Israel and Palestine. Still wrestling with "a conflict that never left me," Ayouch created this poignant documentary about young Israelis, displaced Palestinians, and the threads of tragic history woven between two communities with deep ties to the same land. Ayouch entered Lebanese refugee camps to record personal testimonies from elderly Palestinians about memories of their birthplaces. Then he visited those homes in present-day Israel to learn about the attitudes of the young people currently living there. This process of gathering perspectives enabled Ayouch to set up the film's evocative virtual encounters, in which the Israeli subjects view and [...]
Online
2011
15.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Paul Conneally - Digital Humanitarianism

The disastrous earthquake in Haiti taught humanitarian groups an unexpected lesson: the power of mobile devices to coordinate, inform, and guide relief efforts. At TEDxRC2, Paul Conneally shows extraordinary examples of social media and other technologies becoming central to humanitarian aid. Paul Conneally is the public communications manager for the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.
Online
2012
16.

WMD [electronic resource]: Weapons of Mass Deception

According to investigative journalist Danny Schechter, the U.S. conducted two wars in Iraq in 2003: one was a military assault, and the other was a media assault on the American public, or what he calls "jingoism posing as journalism." In this carefully-researched documentary, Schechter argues that the Pentagon employed classic propaganda techniques to control media coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Schechter uses insider interviews and a wealth of news clips to explain how the Pentagon pulled it off and why the media complied. From Jessica Lynch's manufactured hero story to the Lynndie England torture photos to the bogus reports that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, Schechter builds a case that is corroborated by respected mainstream news sources. With commentary from Peter [...]
Online
2004
17.

The "White Australia" Policy [electronic resource]: Constraining the Servile Races-Immigration Nation

When the Commonwealth of Australia was founded in 1901, the last thing the country wanted was to be multicultural. The measures taken to ensure an all-white nation not only caused human suffering, but actually helped create the very threat Australia feared the most - invasion from the Asian north. Through the plight of a Chinese family kept apart by immigration laws, this program examines the legal and social policies that once prohibited entry into Australia by people of color. The video covers Charles Pearson, whose book about the "servile races" frightened Prime Minister Barton into passing the Immigration Restriction Act; the influence of adventure novelist H. Rider Haggard; and President Wilson's dismissal of the Racial Equality plan proposed by Japan to the League of Nations, a [...]
Online
2010
18.

World War II [electronic resource]: Populate or Perish-Immigration Nation

Australia faced a population crisis after the second world war, in that experts believed the country could not defend itself or grow economically unless it boosted the number of people living there. With the pool of available Britons decreasing, Immigration Minister Arthur Caldwell made the momentous decision to permit non-British settlement. This program explains how Australia accepted an influx of a million newcomers in the middle of the 20th century while still clinging to its whites-only policy. Caldwell convinced wary citizens that the nation must "populate or perish" before the next Japanese attack, then recruited European war refugees, filling a ship with fit-looking men and buxom women who came to be known as the Beautiful Balts - a PR tactic calculated to assuage Australian [...]
Online
2010
19.

Cold War [electronic resource]: Australia Opens Its Doors

Despite being criticized overseas, Australia's exclusionary attitude toward people of color was still popular at home during the Cold War era, with the rise of communism further justifying the need to prevent Asians from entering the country. But change was in the air as civil rights movements gained momentum and a new generation questioned the ethos of the past. This program looks at the people and events responsible for dismantling Australia's whites-only immigration policy at the end of the 20th century. The unforeseen consequences of Robert Menzies' Colombo Plan, in which Asians would be allowed temporary residence in Australia; the staged kidnapping of a 6-year-old Fijian girl facing deportation; and Prime Minister Fraser's eventual acceptance of the thousands of Vietnamese refu [...]
Online
2010
20.

One Fine Day [electronic resource]: Individual Acts of Courage and Defiance

Idealists thrive on the notion that a single person can change the world-but what basis does it have in reality? Is there room for it in an age of oppression and unrepentant brutality? This film profiles six people from different cultures and religions who, through small nonviolent actions, helped to overcome injustice. Ashin Kovida, a Buddhist monk now living in the U.S., reflects on his leadership of anti-government protests in Myanmar, formerly Burma. Maria Jesus Sanhueza, a young Chilean woman, describes her role in the Penguin Revolution which brought about government funding for education. And Christian Fuhrer, former pastor of the St. Nicholas Church in Leipzig, Germany, recounts the Monday Demonstrations and "Prayers for Peace" that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Equally [...]
Online
2012