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2.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Taming Capitalism Run Wild

Even as President Obama's talking points champion the middle class and condemn how our economy caters to the very rich, the truth behind modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage - as suggested by the president - faces opposition from those who apparently pledge allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Some, however, aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back. In this edition of Moyers & Company, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shed light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake and discusses how to battle for economic justice. Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan.
Online
2013
3.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Justice for Restaurant Workers

In this edition of Moyers & Company, Saru Jayaraman - who marched on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet - joins Bill to talk about how we can best support these workers' right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the cofounder and codirector of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's ten million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an insider's exposé of the restaurant industry. An essay on predatory capitalism and the One Percent concludes the program.
Online
2013
4.

Voices of the Poor [electronic resource]

In the shadow of an increasingly interconnected and globalized economy, many of the world's poor are worse off than ever before. This classic documentary travels to Tanzania, Mali, India, Brazil, and Bosnia to present some practical solutions offered by poor people themselves as they face the challenge of improving their living conditions. Slum residents who have formed community activist groups explain why having sewage systems and permanent housing will improve their ability to get jobs, and microloan recipients discuss their hopes of financing their children's education. "There are the poor, and there are the miserable," says an elderly woman in Brazil. "We are the poor, but we are fighting to rise ...
Online
2001
5.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: MLK's Dream of Economic Justice

Martin Luther King had long known that racial equality was inextricably linked to economic equity-fairness for all, including working people and the poor. In the last year of his life, Dr. King announced the Poor People's Campaign to demand an "economic bill of rights" for all Americans, regardless of color. But nearly a half-century later, that dream is still a dream deferred. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch and author and theologian James Cone join Bill to discuss Dr. King's vision of economic justice...and why so little has changed for America's most oppressed. Also on the show, poet Kyle Dargan, whose poetry provides a window into the humanity that Branch and Cone say is essential to get people working towards justice, visits Bi [...]
Online
2013
6.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: The United States of Inequality

The unprecedented level of economic inequality in America is undeniable. This edition of Moyers & Company reports on dismaying extremes of wealth and poverty on display in California's Silicon Valley. Facebook, Google, and Apple are minting millionaires while the area's homeless-who've grown 20 percent in the last two years-are living in tent cities at their virtual doorsteps. These are the human faces of economic inequality.
Online
2013
7.

China's Stolen Children [electronic resource]

Kidnapping and selling children is big business in China, where every year more than 20,000 are stolen. In the majority of cases, the birth parents lack the resources or connections to find their missing children, while police investigations drag on for years and are rarely resolved. China's Stolen Children focuses on the cases of two young girls: 3-year-old Wamping, who was abducted two years ago, and Dai-kidnapped at 10 and who, 22 years later, has finally managed to track down her birth family. Will Wamping, recently sighted, be reunited with her mother and father? And how do Dai's "purchasing parents" justify being a party to abduction? Heartbreaking. Powerful.
Online
2012
8.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: And Justice for Some

Though a landmark Supreme Court decision 50 years ago established the right of criminal defendants to legal representation-even if they can't afford it-the scales of the American legal system still tilt heavily in favor of the white and wealthy. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill sits down with civil rights attorney and legal scholar Bryan Stevenson, who exposes the legal system's failures and its ongoing struggles at the crossroads of race, class, and justice. Also, journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien talk about inequities in death row legal representation and sentencing across the country. The program closes with an essay on the hypocrisy of "justice for all" in a society where billions are squandered for a war born in fraud while the poor are pushed aside.
Online
2013
9.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Elyn Saks - a Tale of Mental Illness…from the Inside

Is it okay if I totally trash your office? It's a question Elyn Saks once asked her doctor, and it wasn't a joke. A legal scholar, in 2007 Saks came forward with her own story of schizophrenia-a condition controlled by drugs and therapy yet ever-present. In this powerful TEDTalk, she asks us to see people with mental illnesses clearly, honestly, and compassionately.
Online
2012
10.

Born-Again Feminist [electronic resource]: Dolores Huerta

In the 1960s, labor leader and civil rights activist, Dolores Huerta organized in the fields, spearheading a national boycott of grapes and lettuce and making decent pay and working conditions a reality for thousands of farm workers. After receiving a Medal of Freedom at the White House in May 2012, Huerta spoke with NewsHour's Ray Suarez.
Online
2012
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Ernesto Sirolli - Want to Help Someone? Shut Up and Listen!

When most well-intentioned aid workers hear of a problem they think they can fix, they go to work. This, Ernesto Sirolli suggests, is naive. In this funny and impassioned TEDTalk, he proposes that the first step is to listen to the people you're trying to help and then tap into their own entrepreneurial spirit. His advice on what works will help any entrepreneur. Some language may be offensive.
Online
2012
12.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: How People Power Generates Change

With our democracy threatened more than ever by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets, the antidote to organized money is organized people. Across the country, individuals are banding together and demanding change-and often delivering it. This edition of Moyers & Company introduces viewers to three grassroots organizers leading the way. First up: Marshall Ganz, a social movement legend associated with Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964, the United Farm Workers' Cesar Chavez, and Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Later on the show, the spotlight shifts to economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, cofounder and national policy director of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.
Online
2013
13.

One Fine Day [electronic resource]: Individual Acts of Courage and Defiance

Idealists thrive on the notion that a single person can change the world-but what basis does it have in reality? Is there room for it in an age of oppression and unrepentant brutality? This film profiles six people from different cultures and religions who, through small nonviolent actions, helped to overcome injustice. Ashin Kovida, a Buddhist monk now living in the U.S., reflects on his leadership of anti-government protests in Myanmar, formerly Burma. Maria Jesus Sanhueza, a young Chilean woman, describes her role in the Penguin Revolution which brought about government funding for education. And Christian Fuhrer, former pastor of the St. Nicholas Church in Leipzig, Germany, recounts the Monday Demonstrations and "Prayers for Peace" that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Equally [...]
Online
2012
14.

Mama Illegal [electronic resource]: Undocumented in Western Europe

Putting their trust and safety in the hands of illicit traffickers, three mothers from a bleak Moldovan village make their way to Austria and Italy, where they find work as cleaners or care workers. This film depicts seven years in the lives of Raia, Aurica, and Natasa-vulnerable lives that are lived underground, without valid documents, without health care, without the comforting presence of loved ones. Diligent and careful, each woman sends what little remains of her hard-earned Western money home to her family. But there is an unexpected, paradoxical price to these plans for a brighter future: never fully "arriving" and gaining acceptance in the West, each worker finds, when her self-exile has ended, that she has become alienated from her own children and husband. The economic bar [...]
Online
2011
15.

Where the Streets Have No Name [electronic resource]

This sobering film documents one man's emotional journey after 20 years of trying to help alleviate homelessness in Cairns, Australia. With Harald Falge, we follow the street kids there, hearing their stories and tracing their lives to uncover the bitter reality behind the paradise of this north Queensland city. A dark, intimate, unforgettable, and sometimes chilling experience.
Online
2012
16.

Tax Havens [electronic resource]: Where Money Hides in Style

Investigating the strange world of tax havens, this film shows how some companies, including hugely profitable ones, use a particular European nation as a shelter to avoid paying millions in taxes. Viewers learn about recently discovered documents that have helped expose the tax practices of companies like GlaxoSmithKline. Such corporations have been getting big tax breaks on billion-pound transactions in the tiny country of Luxembourg. By opening offices there, diverting profits overseas, and having the Luxembourg office lend to offices in other parts of the world, a company can avoid multimillion euro tax bills in their country of origin. Viewers are left with an inevitable question: in times of economic hardship and austerity, when reducing government debt looms as an ever-greater [...]
Online
2012
17.

Goldman Sachs and the Decline of Greece [electronic resource]

Over more than a decade, America's top investment bank provided risky financial products that sent the Greek government further and further into debt. Goldman Sachs earned hundreds of millions on the deal while the position of Greece within the European Union became untenable. Traveling to New York, London, and Athens, this film reveals what happened and examines the devastating consequences in present-day Greece. Viewers learn how, even as the Greek debt edged closer to 60 percent of the nation's GDP (the limit set in the Maastricht Treaty of 1992), both Goldman Sachs and the Greek government continued with "business as usual," and how Eurostat, the EU's statistics office in Brussels, was informed about these instances of financial engineering and raised no objections. The film also [...]
Online
2012
18.

Toxic Labels [electronic resource]: The Dark Side of Outsourcing

Western consumers are accustomed to buying low-cost garments, but in global terms there is a larger price to be paid-a price in human health, security, and dignity. It seems that many manufacturers still rely on dubious production models, benefitting from "legal" child labor in overseas factories or from a cruelty that afflicts victims of all ages-forced labor, also known as slavery. This program enters the sweatshops of Bangladesh, where girls like 12-year-old Khadija endure 60-hour work weeks. In Dhaka viewers meet Hanan, one of a growing number of laborers with diseased lungs, a result of his years spent sandblasting denim. Returning to Europe, the film accesses a confidential document from Inditex, owners of Zara, showing that every one of their Indian suppliers was graded D (the [...]
Online
2012
19.

High-Frequency Trading [electronic resource]: Do Machines Control Wall Street?

Although it isn't a widely-acknowledged practice, many experts predict that high-frequency trading, invented by Wall Street firms at the turn of the 21st century, will lead to the next financial crisis. This program illustrates the basic principles of HFT, whereby a large number of computers are interconnected in order to purchase and sell thousands of market shares every microsecond, with no human control or regulation, for maximum profit. Viewers are taken inside a manic world dominated by machines - or, more precisely, by elaborate algorithms carefully developed by mathematicians. But how secure is this high-tech wonderland? The film also examines the possibility that software can break down and create what's known as a flash crash, an instantaneous market collapse. To borrow from [...]
Online
2012
20.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Distracted From Democracy

Across the world - Egypt, Greece, Spain, Brazil - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else? In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill is joined by media scholar Marty Kaplan, who points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction.
Online
2013