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Wave Theory of Light
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1.

Maxwell's Equations [electronic resource]

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Discusses the discovery of the displacement current and its ability to produce electromagnetic waves called light.
Online
1985
2.

Making Sound

Dr. Helen Czerski investigates the extraordinary science behind sounds we're familiar with and sounds we normally can't hear. At the Palace of Westminster,she teams up with scientists from the University of Leicester to carry out state-of-the-art measurements to reveal how Big Ben vibrates to create pressure waves in the air at particular frequencies. With soprano singer Lesley Garrett, Helen explores the science of the singing voice. At the summit of Stromboli, Helen and volcanologist Dr. Jeffrey Johnson use a special microphone to record the extraordinary deep tone produced by the volcano as it explodes—a frequency far too low for the human ear to detect. Finally, at the University of Cambridge's Institute of Astronomy, Helen meets a scientist who has discovered evidence of sound w [...]
Online
2017
3.

Spreading

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk observes that spreading decreases the energy of sound as it travels. Energy loss due to spreading is proportional to the square of the distance from the source.
Online
2015; 2011
4.

Sonar

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about sonar, which stands for sound navigation and ranging, the process by which objects (like submarines, for example) are discovered when sound waves are reflected off of them and then detected.
Online
2015; 2011
5.

Using Sound

Dr. Helen Czerski examines the extraordinary messages sound waves carry and how they help us understand the world around us. Visiting a hidden location buried beneath the hills of Scotland, Helen experiences some of the most extreme acoustics in the world. She discovers how sound has driven the evolution of biological systems and complex relationships between creatures that exploit sound. Through the story of a cochlea implant patient, Helen explores the complicated way our ears can translate sound waves. On the North Sea, she investigates how marine archaeologists use sound waves to uncover human stories buried beneath the sea.
Online
2017
6.

Heard Island Test and Climate Change, the

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through sound in a test done near Heard Island, an area considered unique because sound emanating from that point can theoretically reach every ocean basin on Earth.
Online
2015; 2011
7.

Using Sound to Measure Ocean Warming

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through the use of sound--a process known as dark acoustic thermometry. Professor Munk notes that since the speed of sound increases in the ocean with temperature, the time it takes for a pulse to cross a body of water should diminish as the water gets warmer.
Online
2015; 2011
8.

Marine Animals and Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the use of sound by marine animals. Professor Monk observes that while scientists don't fully understand all the ways marine animals use sound, it is generally believed that animals in the marine environment probably use sound to search for food and mates, as well during the navigation process.
Online
2015; 2011
9.

TEDTalks: David Brenner—A New Weapon in the Fight Against Superbugs

Since the widespread use of antibiotics began in the 1940s, we've tried to develop new drugs faster than bacteria can evolve—but this strategy isn't working. Drug-resistant bacteria known as superbugs killed nearly 700,000 people last year, and by 2050 that number could be 10 million—more than cancer kills each year. Can physics help? In a talk from the frontiers of science, radiation scientist David Brenner shares his work studying a potentially life-saving weapon: a wavelength of ultraviolet light known as far-UVC, which can kill superbugs safely, without penetrating our skin. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson.
Online
2018; 2017
10.

Temperature and the Velocity of Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the relationship between temperature and the velocity of sound, observing that velocity increases with temperature. Because temperature generally increases anywhere from ten to twenty degrees moving up from one kilometer to the surface, so, too, does the speed of sound generally increase closer to the surface.
Online
2015; 2011
11.

Global Warming and Sea Level Change

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the relationship between global warming and sea level change. Professor Munk points out that, contrary to popular belief, the melting of floating ice does not change sea level. It is the melting of land-based ice masses that contributes to a rise in sea level.
Online
2015; 2011
12.

Light Phase and Matter

Dr. Catherine Low discusses difficulties students have with models and concepts of light and matter. Catherine recently completed her PhD in Theoretical Particle Physics and is currently teaching senior physics in New Zealand. Catherine Bell discusses the importance of phase in understanding the behavior of waves. She is completing a PhD on Phase Microscopy and is currently teaching senior Physics.
Online
2017; 2007
13.

Photonics

Presenter Dr Alex Mazzolini, Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences at Swinburne University, covers the following topics: photonics in everyday life, light sources, fiber optics, and ideas for practical demonstrations.
Online
2017; 2007
14.

Speech to Laser to Sound

New technology using a one-color laser may drive future generation of high-tech hearing aids. Scientists are testing a new idea, a device that uses a laser to encode sound in the form of light pulses and then transmit them onto tissues in the ear, which absorb the light and vibrate, inducing sound waves.
Online
2017
15.

Shadow Zones

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about shadow zones, which develop in response to surface heating and other geophysical phenomena, and behind which the volume of sound is much lower than in surrounding areas.
Online
2015; 2011
16.

Noise Pollution and Marine Life

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the impact of sound on marine animals. He discusses the campaign of environmental groups to cut down on noise pollution in the ocean--a campaign which Professor Munk argues resulted in opposition to valuable oceanographic research.
Online
2015; 2011
17.

Scattering

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about scattering, which occurs as sound bounces off bubbles, suspended particles, organisms, the surface, the bottom, or other objects. Small-scale temperature changes which act like foreign objects can also scatter the sound.
Online
2015; 2011
18.

Sound and Other Demonstrations

Sandor Kazi presents a range of demonstrations related to waves, including: wave machines, standing waves, Chladni figures, ripple tanks and resonance. Sandor teaches senior Physics. Nick Nicola is the Undergraduate Laboratory Manager, School of Physics, University of Melbourne. His demonstrations focus on upper secondary physics.
Online
2017; 2007
19.

The Chemistry of Light

Chemistry and light come together to create a hopeful horizon. Environmental friendliness and energy savings are the main bastions of photocatalysis.
Online
2017; 2014
20.

Ocean as a Sound Channel, the

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about differences in the ways sound travels in the ocean as compared to through the air. He observes that the ocean is an ideal medium through which sound can travel.
Online
2015; 2011