You searched for:

Subject
:
Water — Environmental Aspects
x
61 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Captured Rain [electronic resource]: America's Thirst for Canadian Water

As current sources of fresh water become increasingly inadequate to support the needs of North America below the Canadian border, the U.S. and Mexico are looking toward their northern neighbor for relief. This program examines the political and commercial ramifications of NAFTA on the bulk export of water, as well as initiatives to conserve and recycle fresh water in the Sun Belt and in northern Mexico. Former senator Paul Simon, environmentalist Richard Bocking, agronomist Wendy Holm, trade negotiators, lawyers, and others discuss the growing geopolitical tension surrounding the commodification of water.
Online
2005; 2000
2.

Water for the Fields [electronic resource]

No matter where on Earth, the one human activity that consumes the most water is the one that wastes the most: agriculture. From locations around the world, this program surveys both disasters of agricultural irrigation, such as cotton farming in Uzbekistan, and innovative successes in water-efficient techniques and crops, such as in California and India. Numerous examples illustrate the destructive effects of deforestation and overgrazing, the difficulty of fighting erosion and reclaiming arable soil, and the urgency of the motto: more crop per drop.
Online
2006; 2003
3.

Water for the Cities [electronic resource]

This program takes a hard look at the mounting challenge of providing millions of people in urban areas with potable water and adequate disposal of waste water. To highlight the difficulties, segments focus on the water problems of the megalopolis, cities with populations of over ten million people, such as Lagos, Jakarta, and Mexico City. The massive logistics that enable Las Vegas to prosper in the middle of a desert are also explored.
Online
2006; 2003
4.

Testing the Limits of Possibility [electronic resource]: Massive Dams and Waterworks

When it comes to water management, many politicians and technocrats have felt that colossal problems are only solved by colossal projects: dams. But blind faith in concrete can often have devastating effects on communities and the environment. This program examines the positive and negative impact, as well as the politics and economics of several ongoing or proposed projects: China's Three Gorges Dam, Egypt's Mubarak pumping station, pit-mine reclamation in Germany's Lausitz region, and Spain's controversial national hydrological plan for the Ebro river.
Online
2006; 2003
5.

Water for Profit [electronic resource]

The moment demand outpaces supply, water becomes a commodity to be traded in the global market. But who owns the rights to water? And how can a price be set on water? In this program, the pros and cons of privatization are assessed in a number of water management situations around the world: Aguas Argentina in Buenos Aires; the Bechtel corporation in Cochabamba, Bolivia; Thames Water company in Jakarta; and a public/private test partnership in Albania. Corporate representatives, anti-privatization activists, farmers, and industry experts offer commentary from all sides of the issue.
Online
2006; 2003
6.

Waters of Discord [electronic resource]

Almost half the world gets its drinking water from rivers that cross national boundaries. Analysts predict that more wars will be fought over water than oil. This program surveys a number of active or potential hot spots: Israel and the river Jordan; the Southeastern Anatolia Project in Turkey and its effects on Syria and Iraq; Egypt's Toshka Canal and the Nile Basin Initiative; and the Tehri dam in India. The program also looks at the effects of the Hoover dam on the Colorado River delta in Mexico and the success of Lesotho's Katse dam. Vandana Shiva, author of Water Wars, discusses many of these situations.
Online
2006; 2003
7.

Watery Visions [electronic resource]: Is the Future Potable?

In a dramatic reversal of policy since apartheid, South Africa has become a model of water fulfillment. Despite being one of the driest regions on Earth, India's Rajasthan is an oasis due to the revival of a system of ancient rain basins. This program looks at these encouraging examples to show how sustainable solutions to long-term water management can be achieved, while a visit to Sertao in Brazil illustrates the appalling alternative-two very different futures.
Online
2006; 2003
8.

Boiling Point [electronic resource]: Global Struggle for Water

Competition for freshwater is heating up. Is war inevitable, or is a peaceful solution possible? This program spotlights three trouble spots that epitomize the intensifying crisis and efforts being made to manage it: the Okavango, where a commission formed by Angola, Namibia, and Botswana is trying to resolve the conflict that is endangering the river's unspoiled waters; the Rio Grande, where an aging water-sharing treaty and ever-greater demands for water leave farmers on both sides of the divide with little hope; and the West Bank, where Palestinian rainwater reservoirs and the Israeli water grid are dangerous points of contention between the two peoples.
Online
2006; 2002
9.

Rice [electronic resource]: Precious Commodity

A staple for over half the world, rice is truly a precious commodity. This program looks at the ubiquitous grain from all angles, offering concise sections on its history, biology, primary production, processing, marketing, and the environmental impact of its farming. In addition, the program highlights the creation of miracle rice strains through breeding or genetic modification and summarizes health and safety issues concerning rice farming and processing. A summary of information follows each section.
Online
2006; 2003
10.

Brownfield Basics [electronic resource]

After addressing terms and concepts essential to an understanding of brownfields, this program turns to author Storm Cunningham and Robert Colangelo, executive director of the National Brownfields Association, for historical background on the problem. In addition, nationally recognized experts Charles Bartsch and Ira Whitman discuss legislation that led to the Brownfields Revitalization Act of 2002, and City of Phoenix brownfields coordinator Rosanne Sanchez talks about her work with community leaders, state officials, and private developers. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
11.

State and Local Brownfields Programs [electronic resource]

State and local programs are on the frontlines of brownfields reclamation. This documentary-a practical primer with many examples-catalogs common types of environmental challenges faced in the redevelopment of contaminated properties. Virginia brownfields coordinator Chris Evans and U.S. EPA Region V Administrator Tom Skinner comment on their efforts. David Sampson and Dennis Alvord, both of the EDA, review federal programs available to states and local communities. And Kathy Blaha, of The Trust for Public Land, outlines options beyond commercial redevelopment. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2005; 2004
12.

Small Communities and Brownfields Recovery [electronic resource]

This program focuses on rural and small communities and tribal governments implementing brownfields recovery initiatives. Kathie Atencio, U.S. EPA Region VIII brownfields coordinator, discusses redevelopment projects in the western states-particularly in the Dakotas. In addition, EDA, HUD, and other EPA personnel as well as community leaders and project managers offer insights into proposals being implemented all across the country, drawing case studies from Virginia, Florida, New England, and elsewhere. America's first eco-industrial park, a brownfield-to-brightfield project, and a waterfront redevelopment project are featured. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
13.

Voluntary Brownfields Cleanup Programs [electronic resource]

In this documentary, environmental regulators share their knowledge about voluntary brownfields cleanup programs. Linda Garczynski, director of the U.S. EPA Office of Brownfields, explains how regulatory flexibility and memorandums of agreement facilitate the cleaning up of polluted sites for redevelopment. Arizona brownfields coordinator Ren Willis-Frances covers different ways to address cleanup activities. And Stan Hitt, brownfields administrator from U.S. EPA Region VI, analyzes approaches that have worked in the past. Many before-and-after shots-from Houston, to Phoenix, to York, Pennsylvania-illustrate properties restored to productive use. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
14.

Brownfields Liability and Remediation [electronic resource]

Throughout her career, Denise Chamberlain has advised business, government, and community representatives on site remediation and redevelopment. In this program, Ms. Chamberlain focuses on brownfields liability reform and the Phoenix Awards. Charles Bartsch, Ira Whitman, and Cherokee Investments' Thomas Darden offer insights into liability issues as well. Additional interviews with EPA, HUD, and EDA officials from around the U.S. balance out the video. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
15.

Financial Programs for Brownfields Remediation [electronic resource]

By expanding the legal definition of a brownfield, clarifying remediation standards, and limiting investor liability, the Brownfields Revitalization Act of 2002 added much-needed momentum to the land recycling movement. This documentary shows how redevelopers of brownfields, both actual and perceived, are bridging the financial gap between proposal and implementation with cleanup grants, tax credits, low-interest and revolving loans, hazardous discharge remediation funding, bonds, and empowerment zoning. Many experts-public planners and private developers, regional administrators and state coordinators, lenders and insurers-are featured. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
16.

Economic Development of Brownfields [electronic resource]

Job creation, tax base expansion, neighborhood improvement, and sustainable development are only four of the many themes covered in this documentary as it presents the economics side of infill development using examples drawn from the Northeast and Southwest. The EDA's Dennis Alvord and David Sampson, environmental engineering and management specialist Ira Whitman, and a host of other experts discuss how communities are using strategies including tax increment financing to redevelop nonperforming assets such as the Bethlehem Steel site, in Pennsylvania. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
17.

Brownfields, Community Involvement, and Smart Growth [electronic resource]

In this program, Katherine Heller, of RTI International; Jane Mergler, of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Norman Camp III, co-chairman of Partners for Environmental Justice; and other experts drive home the importance of community involvement in brownfields reclamation. Renewal projects in Baltimore, Trenton, Phoenix, Denver, and elsewhere illustrate how sustainable redevelopment depends heavily on sharing information, balancing majority interests with minority rights, and long-range planning. Increasingly, brownfields are proving to be a viable alternative to greenspace depletion and an essential part of America's smart-growth strategy. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004
18.

Sea Changes [electronic resource]: Medicine From the Ocean

Once conducted almost entirely on dry land, the hunt for biochemical and pharmaceutical resources is shifting to the world's oceans. This program examines various phases of that research-algae and sponge extraction around the globe, the growing utilization of toxic substances produced by some marine organisms, and the practical application of treatments and cures that are often a dozen years in the making. With its ethical discussions about animal testing and the prerogatives of developing countries, Sea Changes provides a balanced and comprehensive look at a fascinating vanguard in undersea exploration.
Online
2006; 2004
19.

The Tasmanian Chain Saw Massacre [electronic resource]: Ancient Forests in Peril

In 1970, the paper industry set its sights on the lush forests of Tasmania-beginning what environmentalists call a chain saw massacre that still cuts down 8 million cubic meters of timber each year. This program documents the ongoing fight to save the coveted woodlands, championed by a diverse group of activists. Viewers learn about early on-site protests that met with violence and abuse, as well as a wider and increasingly sophisticated Internet campaign against Gunns Limited, a corporate giant in the wood products industry, urging investors not to fund the company's new pulp mill project. Will a real winner emerge from this bitter conflict, and will the weapons be legal or lethal?
Online
2010; 2009
20.

How Many People Can Live on Planet Earth? [electronic resource]

Thirst, starvation, claustrophobia-all three await the whole of humanity, if global population and consumption rates continue unchanged. This program explores the looming crisis in practical terms, measuring as accurately as possible our planet's capacity for human habitation. Host Sir David Attenborough guides viewers through the core problems of water scarcity, shortsighted agricultural policies, and alarming birth and death statistics compiled by the United Nations. Expert guests include population expert and London School of Economics professor Timothy Dyson; Nature Conservancy Sustainable Waters Program director Brian Richter; and NASA analyst Dr. Molly Brown.
Online
2010; 2009