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1.

Electric Signs: Signs, Screens and Public Space

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"New screen-based sign systems are putting TV-style advertising into the public domain in cities around the globe. These electronic signs are re-shaping urban environments and re-defining areas of public space by intensifying the commercialization of the public sphere. The film's narrator, a city observer modeled on the critic Walter Benjamin, takes us on a journey through a variety of urban landscapes, examining public spaces and making connections between light, perception, and the culture of attractions in today's consumer society. The film is structured as a documentary essay in the spirit of city symphony films, and features Hong Kong, Los Angeles and New York, and other cities around the world. Also featured are interviews with prominent lighting designers; advertising and mark [...]
DVD
2013; 2012
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Helvetica

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A documentary about a typeface? When said typeface is a ubiquitous piece of graphic design, yes. Helvetica--a sans-serif typeface developed in 1957 at the Haas Foundry in Munchenstein, Switzerland--has partisans and detractors, a great number of them graphic designers and theorists, who express their opinions on the famous font. It is seen as neutral and efficient, concise yet inexpressive, purposeful yet not caustic, utilitarian and unembellished, or as frustratingly familiar, perfectly subliminal, or as the typeface of socialism. From storefronts, street signs, product packaging, government forms, and advertisements, it is almost guaranteed that after viewing, you will be scanning the world examining Helvetica's continuing impact.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Semiotics of the Kitchen

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A women names kitchen items and demonstrates their use.
VHS
1975
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Scanning Television

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Forty excerpts from television programming and commercials to illustrate the media's ability to persuade and influence thinking, selected for use in media literacy studies.
VHS
1997; 1996
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Color [electronic resource]

Color is perhaps the most powerful artistic element, but it is also the most difficult to control. In this program, artist June Redfern goes to Venice to see one of her favorite paintings-Titian's Assumption of the Virgin. Analyzing Titian's innovative use of color, Redfern traces other color innovations pioneered by artists like Monet, Van Gogh, and Mark Rothko.
Online
2006; 1997
6.

Composition [electronic resource]

Everyone has the desire to arrange things in a way that is most pleasing to the eye. In painting, composition involves arranging every ingredient-shape, color, texture, and light-so that working together, they create artistic balance. In this program, artist Ray Richardson deliberately chooses a long, slim canvas to challenge his compositional abilities. As he confronts his quest to create a cinemascopic work, students begin to appreciate the composition techniques of painters such as Piero della Francesca, Tintoretto, Degas, and Matisse.
Online
2006; 1997
7.

Perspective [electronic resource]

In this program, artists Ben Johnson and Patrick Hughes travel to Florence, where 15th-century painter Piero della Francesca first employed mathematically based perspective. Tracing the use of perspective, they discuss how artists at the beginning of the 20th century rebelled against its limitations. Johnson then uses a computer to create a perfect perspective model for a planned painting, while Hughes completely subverts the rules of perspective in creating his own work.
Online
2006; 1997
8.

The Question Mark Inside [electronic resource]: Martin Firrell's Art at St. Paul's Cathedral

Described as "the artful dodger meets Einstein meets an explosion in a sequin factory," public artist Martin Firrell specializes in large-scale digital projections onto iconic architecture-text messages that raise questions about faith, human rights, cultural diversity, and other subjects. Marking the first time that Firrell has allowed cameras into his creative process, this program follows his controversial St. Paul's Cathedral project from beginning to end and includes commentary on the work from religious leaders, atheists, philosophers, and writers. From Firrell's negotiations with Cathedral bureaucrats to the impressions of everyday Londoners, the film offers a compelling juxtaposition of religious, cultural, and aesthetic challenges.
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Art and Design [electronic resource]: Insights Into the Visual Arts

Where do abstract painters and fashion designers find their muses? To what extent does the creative process differ between video artists, sculptors, and fine art embroiderers? How do illustrators and mixed media artists handle the business side of their work? Using capsule interviews with contemporary figures on the U.K. visual arts scene, this program draws viewers into the studio space and immerses them in the hands-on processes and limitless possibilities of art and design. Section one, "Artists and Ideas," explores sources of inspiration, the foundational importance of drawing, and a variety of functions for sketchbooks and journals. Section two, "Art Practice," considers contextual referencing in art, the development of ideas, artistic materials and techniques, the relative meri [...]
Online
2010; 2009
10.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Daniel Libeskind - 17 Words of Architectural Inspiration

Architecture is not based on concrete and steel and the elements of the soil," says Daniel Libeskind. "It's based on wonder." In this TEDTAlk, the renowned architect shares 17 words - including "raw," "risky," and "radical" - that underlie his vision for architecture and offer inspiration for any bold creative pursuit. Libeskind, perhaps best known for his controversial design for the rebuilt World Trade Center, talks about architecture reflecting the mood of a society, the emotionality of cities, and his mission to create spaces that are vibrant, pluralistic, and transformative.
Online
2009
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: David Carson - Design, Discovery, and Humor

David Carson's boundary-breaking typography in the 1990s in Ray Gun magazine and other pop-culture books ushered in a new vision of type and page design, breaking the traditional mold of type on a page and demanding fresh eyes from the reader. Squishing, smashing, slanting, and enchanting the words on a layout, Carson emphasizes the fact that letters on a page are art. His influence can be seen on a million Flash intro pages as well as on skateboards and t-shirts. In this TEDTalk, Carson teaches us that great design is a never-ending journey of discovery - for which it helps to pack a healthy sense of humor. This sociologist and surfer-turned-designer walks through a gorgeous (and often quite funny) slide show of his work and found images.
Online
2009
12.

Light and Shadow [electronic resource]

The use of special light effects as a narrative element; the suggestion of an internal source of light in the work of Rembrandt and his followers; Vermeer's alternation of sunlight and shadow; the absence of shadow in Mondrian; the uses of light to relate interior to exterior space; the use of light as a material-this program looks at five centuries of light and shadow in Dutch art.
Online
2012
13.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Thelma Golden - How Art Gives Shape to Cultural Change

Thelma Golden, curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem, talks through three recent shows that explore how art examines and redefines culture. The "post-black" artists she works with are using their art to provoke a new dialogue about race and culture - and about the meaning of art itself.
Online
2010
14.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Olafur Eliasson - Playing With Space and Light

In the spectacular large-scale installations he's famous for Olafur Eliasson makes art from a palette of air, distance, color, and light, always playing with the viewer's sense of their experience with his creation. Eliasson begins this idea-packed TEDTalk with an audience-participation experiment about the nature of perception before launching into a discusses of some of his works. Projects such as New York City Waterfalls, the weather project, and Green river, he says, are about "making space tangible.
Online
2009
15.

Knowledge and Progress: Part 2 [electronic resource]

What is the meaning and scope of images today? Bombarded by thousands of images every day, what do we really see? In a constantly changing world, socially and politically engaged creators are searching for new ways to capture our attention. Filmmaker Helen Doyle has chosen the work of several artists and photographers who provoke us into looking deeper at the outside world and at ourselves.
Online
2013
16.

The Drawings of Michelangelo [electronic resource]

Art students can benefit greatly from comparing Michelangelo's preparatory drawings to his finished masterworks-but viewing them together is virtually impossible in a museum setting. This program solves that problem, closely juxtaposing the artist's pencil and charcoal works with the painting, sculpture, and architecture that grew out of them. Studying drawings at the British Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, and other renowned institutions, the program presents detailed analysis of the Pieta, the colossal David, the Sistine Chapel ceiling, The Last Judgment, the Medici tomb, and St. Peter's Basilica. It also provides insight into Michelangelo's tools, techniques, stylistic evolution, and sexuality.
Online
2006; 2005
17.

Light, Shadow, and Reflection [electronic resource]: Painting With Light

Illumination, darkness, and the mysterious region in between-three basic components of the painted image. This program describes ways that artists have manipulated light over the centuries, and examines religious, psychological, and aesthetic reasons behind their innovations. Viewers will encounter medieval depictions of Biblical narratives and the luminous work of Renaissance and Baroque painters such as Jan van Eyck and Caravaggio. The program also conveys Chardin's mastery of light in still life and the exquisite relationship between sunlight and color in the paintings of Bonnard and Monet.
Online
2007; 2005
18.

Landscape [electronic resource]: Invention of Nature

Some of the earliest landscape paintings are found on the walls of Egyptian tombs-demonstrating that, since ancient times, panoramic scenes of nature have held spiritual significance. This program guides viewers through the history of landscape art and its various emotional, symbolic, and sacred meanings. Progressing through ancient Greek and Roman villa paintings, Byzantine art, and the proto-Renaissance advances of Giotto and Lorenzetti, the program shows how awareness and mastery of perspective evolved, leading to magnificent works by Giorgione, Brueghel, da Vinci, and other masters of landscape.
Online
2007; 2005
19.

Portrait/Self-Portrait [electronic resource]: Conquest of Human Figure

Ten thousand years ago, Magdalenian artists carved expressive faces into slabs of limestone, creating a Paleolithic portrait gallery that required sophisticated drawing skills. This program shows how the art of portraiture has been refined and expanded through the ages. Examples of Egyptian sarcophagi portraits segue into discussions of paintings by Titian, Rafael, Durer, and other masters-including Rembrandt, who produced more self-portraits than any other artist. Examining Modernist and Pop approaches, the program illustrates ways in which Cezanne, Van Gogh, Picasso, and Warhol captured the features and emotions of the human countenance.
Online
2007; 2005
20.

The Artist and the Model [electronic resource]: Age-Old Couple

Throughout the history of painting and sculpture no muse has exerted more influence than the artist's model. This program studies the role of the human form in art, focusing on complex relationships between famous male artists and their female subjects. Works featuring the male figure are also examined. Discussing numerous artistic milestones-including classical Greek statuary, Masaccio's revival of human-centered themes, Botticelli's ethereal Primavera and Venus, and the reclining nudes of Titian, Velazquez, Renoir, and Matisse-the program explores the mystical, erotic, and purely formal inspiration that models have produced.
Online
2007; 2005