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Vietnam War, 1961-1975 — Personal Narratives
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1.

Vietnam's Unseen War: Pictures From the Other Side

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Journey deep behind battle lines to experience a different side of the Vietnam War - the side seen only through the lenses of North Vietnam photographers. Renouned British photojournalist Tim Page travels back to the land where he nearly lost his life to meet with North Vietnamese war photographers, revealing remarkable, never-before-seen photos and personal stories long hidden by time and tragedy.
DVD
2002
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Winter Soldier

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Vietnam veterans speak about atrocities committed upon Vietnamese soldiers and civilians during their time in the U.S. armed forces in Vietnam. Through testimony given at the Winter Soldier Investigation held by the Vietnam Veterans Against the War in 1971, press conferences, and interviews with individual participants, the film graphically portrays the effect of U.S. government policy and practice, which turned soldiers into animals bent on destruction and Vietnamese into "gooks"--Non-human "targets" for murder, rape, and mutilation. The veterans struggle to come to terms with the devastation they caused so that others will not make the same mistake again.
DVD
2005; 1972
3.

Vietnam: The Soldiers' Story

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VHS
1998
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Vietnam: The Soldiers' Story

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VHS
1999; 2000
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Shootout: Tet Offensive

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Nations at war have long honored holidays by pausing their aggression. In 1968 during the celebration of the Lunar New Year, Tet, North Vietnamese forces took advantage of this tradition, ignoring the implied ceasefire and launched a cunning, highly effective offensive in South Vietnam. While a tactical defeat for the Viet Cong, thanks in large part to acts of American heroism like those stirringly depicted here, the Tet Offensive was the turning tide that eventually led to American withdrawal.
Online
2006
6.

Interview With Frank Snepp, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Frank Snepp was the former chief analyst of North Vietnamese strategy for the CIA in Saigon. Snepp recalls the decision of the American forces to pull out of Vietnam. He discusses that Nguyen Van Thieu's cousin, Hoang Duc Nha was the sole member of the South Vietnamese government who did not believe that the Americans would continue to send support and tried to warn Nguyen Van Thieu not to rely on the Americans. He also recalls the corruption within the South Vietnamese government and how the CIA was told not to report any corruption within South Vietnam. Snepp further discusses the evacuation from Vietnam and how it was organized.
Online
1983
7.

Interview With George W. Ball, 1981 [electronic resource]

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George W. Ball served in the State Department under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, and later as Ambassador to the United Nations. He describes the early Johnson Administration as a period of "drift" when the US was becoming increasingly involved in Vietnam, a trend Ball opposed in numerous memos and meetings. Ball discusses his role as the voice of dissent within the Johnson administration, arguing that they learn from mistakes previously committed by the French in Vietnam. He recalls Johnson as a sympathetic and intelligent man who wanted to end the war but could not afford to lose it.
Online
1983
8.

Interview With J. Lawton Collins, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Joseph Lawton Collins, a United States Army General, was the United States Ambassador to Vietnam during early US involvement in Vietnam. Collins recalls why President Eisenhower and Secretary Dulles felt that American presence was necessary in Vietnam and how it figured into the United States stance against communism. Collins also describes his arrival in Vietnam and the difficulties in dealing with Diem and Diem's lack of action. Collins confirmed that Diem's brother and sister-in-law were the real government power, that Diem lacked any administrative ability, and that the American aid Diem was receiving was crucial for the survival of that government.
Online
1983
9.

Interview With Jonathan F. (Jonathan Fredric) Ladd, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Jonathan Frederic (Fred) Ladd, Colonel of Special Forces in Cambodia from 1970-1972 and a political-military counselor at the United States Embassy in Phnom Penh, explains why he was appointed to the Embassy. Ladd refers to his first impressions of the military situation and of Lon Nol, stating that the Cambodians had an amateurish army, that Lon Nol was dedicated to his country, but that he was not a strong leader. Ladd recalls the infighting that was occurring in Washington and his 1971 request to return to the United States due to his feeling that the situation was out of his control: the Cambodians were becoming discouraged and the conflict was becoming a second Vietnam War.
Online
1983
10.

Interview With L. Dean Brown, 1981 [electronic resource]

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L. Dean Brown retired from a 29-year career with the State Department in 1975. Specializing in the Middle East, he had served in Jordan and Cyprus. Two weeks after he retired, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger recalled him to organize the evacuation of Saigon. Here Brown describes the logistics of organizing the evacuation, raising Congressional funds, and the decision to evacuate thousands of Vietnamese, in addition to Americans. Brown downplays the panic portrayed by the media, recalling the events of April 1975 as relatively orderly. He describes empty helicopters leaving Vietnam in the early days of the evacuation because Ambassador Martin, optimistic about a political resolution, failed to organize evacuees. Finally, he praises Gerald Ford's leadership skills and his ability to [...]
Online
1983
11.

Interview With Kenneth Moorefield, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Kenneth Moorefield was an adviser to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) in 1967 and 1968, and then returned to Vietnam as an assistant to the ambassador from 1973 until the end of the war. He discusses the challenges faced by the Americans in Saigon after the Paris Agreement was signed, but aggression from North Vietnam continued. Among these was the rampant corruption among the South Vietnamese political structures and the effects of Watergate on the political climate in the United States. Mr. Moorefield details the catastrophic withdrawal of the South Vietnamese army and civilians from the country's central region, and the days before the evacuation of Saigon. He goes into great detail of the chaos of the evacuation and how he tried to help Vietnamese civilians who wanted t [...]
Online
1983
12.

Interview With le van Tri, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Le Van Tri discusses his medical work treating fallen Viet Cong soldiers in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He describes working under difficult conditions at Bach Mai Hospital, where the operating room was located underground and lit by oil lamps. He also describes the bombing of the hospital and day-to-day struggles to provide medical care in a war zone.
Online
1983
13.

Interview With McGeorge Bundy [electronic resource]

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McGeorge Bundy, brother of William Bundy, served as National Security Advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson from 1961 to 1966. Here he discusses the Vietnam war under both Presidents, specifically addressing the Tonkin Gulf Incident, and the attack on Pleiku Airbase while he was in Vietnam. He also recounts events around the 1965 decision to increase American troops in Vietnam, and a 1968 meeting of the "Wise Men" where Johnson called in former administration officials for their advice on troop levels and bombing strategies.
Online
1983
14.

Interview With Paul C. Warnke, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Secretary of Defense for International Affairs under LBJ, Paul C. Warnke recalls the bombing campaign against the North Vietnamese. He states that one of the misjudgments that the United States made was that victory was more important to the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese than to the Americans. Warnke recalls that even though the bombing was not working, there were no other solutions, so there was a reluctance in the administration to halt the bombing. He states that the turning point came when McNamara realized that the North Vietnamese wanted unification and saw the US as aliens. Warnke talks about his changing views regarding the war and that the US was in a tough situation since they were the ones invading a country, not trying to drive out invaders.
Online
1983
15.

Interview With R.W. Komer, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Robert Komer was in charge of the pacification project in 1966. He recalls the Vietnam War as a war without fronts, in which it was impossible tell who was winning or losing. Komer relates examples of how he was under great pressure to make calculations about the war. He describes the conflicts between civilians and military personnel, and the difficulty of getting materials in and out of Saigon. Komer explains that there were in fact two wars going on in Vietnam: the longstanding civil war and a big-unit war that involved the United States. Komer talks about working with Vietnamese refugees and the question of the success of programs enacted by the United States. He also goes on to explain the pacification process that occurred after the 1968 Tet Offensive and his belief that in the [...]
Online
1983
16.

Interview With Robinson Risner, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Robinson Risner was an Air Force pilot who was shot down over North Vietnam and captured by the North Vietnamese. He was held for over seven years and was repeatedly tortured. He relates his story of being shot down and captured by the North Vietnamese, and then the ordeal of his imprisonment and torture in the "Hanoi Hilton" prison camp. General Risner recalls his feelings during the "Christmas Bombing" and upon hearing of the peace negotiations, and toward the anti-war protesters in the United States.
Online
1983
17.

Interview With Wayne Smith, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Wayne Smith was a combat medic during Vietnam. Smith recalls his Cambodian operations that consisted of search and destroy missions. He discusses his role as a medic, to be as quick as possible to get to the wounded and make sure that they were evacuated. He talks about the waning public support during his time in Vietnam and the morale of the troops in Cambodia. Smith also recalls the news of the pullout in 1970 and how that affected the ongoing military operations.
Online
1983
19.

Choosing Sides: I Remember Vietnam

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Hear stories from ordinary people who made extraordinary life and death choices during the Vietnam War.
DVD
2005
Clemons (Stacks)
20.

Interview With Lucien Conein, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Lucien Conein was an OSS officer in Vietnam in the early 1960s. He recalls the events leading up to the coup d'etat on November, 1963, which resulted in the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem's government. Conein reported plans of the coup to Ambassador Lodge and recalls the US government made it clear to the planners, ahead of time, that the US would neither support nor thwart Diem's overthrow.
Online
1983