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United States — Politics and Government — 1963-1969
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1.

Sir! No Sir!

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The untold story of the rebellion of thousands of American soldiers against the war in Vietnam. This movie profiles an event that profoundly impacted American society, yet has been virtually obliterated from memory.
DVD
2006; 2005
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Chicago Convention Challenge

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Using newreel footage taken in the midst of demonstrations against the Vietnam War during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, this film conveys the immediacy of anti-war organizing in meeting rooms, at rallies and in the streets. It is a valuable historical portrait of events that culminated in police riots against the protesters.
VHS
1998
Ivy (By Request)
3.

The Speeches of Lyndon B. Johnson

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Traces his administration from Kennedy's legacy, through the Civil Rights Act, Vietnam, the Detroit race riots and his announcement that he would not seek the nomination for another term as president.
VHS
1995
Ivy (By Request)
4.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 1 Beautiful Texas [electronic resource]

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Lyndon Baines Johnson was a poor boy from the Texas hill country who ascended to the pinnacle of world power as the 36th president of the United States. LBJ's career started in 1938 when he was elected a congressman, one of the youngest ever. He was elected to the Senate in 1948 under a cloud of suspicion. LBJ won by only 87 votes. In 1954, when the Democrats took over the Senate, LBJ became the youngest majority leader ever at age 46. In 1957, LBJ engineered passage of the first civil rights bill since Reconstruction--but the bill had too many compromises and no teeth. By 1960, LBJ felt he was ready for the presidency, but John Kennedy got there first--and then picked LBJ as his vice president. Hear how LBJ's career got started from the people who were there: John Connally, Bobby Ba [...]
Online
2005; 1991
5.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 2 My Fellow Americans [electronic resource]

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After JFK's assassination, LBJ first calmed the country, then he threw the power of the presidency behind a civil rights bill. As LBJ said, "I'm going to be the president who finishes what Lincoln began." With some old-fashioned arm twisting, LBJ hammered the 1964 Civil Rights Act through Congress. Next he launched the War on Poverty. He envisioned a "Great Society" for all Americans. LBJ was determined to be the greatest president ever. Vietnam would prove to be his undoing. By the time LBJ took office, Truman, Eisenhower, and JFK had all sent advisors to Vietnam. LBJ was not about to look soft on Communism. In August 1964, he rammed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution through Congress. After his landslide victory over Goldwater in November 1964, LBJ felt on top of the world, but it was a [...]
Online
2005; 1991
6.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 3 We Shall Overcome [electronic resource]

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After the triumph of the 1964 election, LBJ felt there was no problem the U.S. couldn't solve. New programs and agencies were created: Head Start, Urban Renewal, Public Television, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed. In March 1965, the first U.S. troops were sent to Vietnam. Only George Ball challenged the conventional wisdom. By July 1965, LBJ had escalated the number of troops from 75,000 to 125,000. The growing quagmire in Vietnam was changing LBJ's presidency.
Online
2005; 1991
7.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 4 the Last Believer [electronic resource]

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At his daughter's wedding in 1966, LBJ was the proud papa. But in 1966 and 1967 race riots in Watts, Detroit, and elsewhere shook the country. In Detroit, 43 people died and 7,000 were arrested. LBJ's Great Society was coming unraveled. Vietnam would do it in. By the end of 1967, a sense of siege came over the White House. The 1968 Tet offensive shattered the illusion of any progress in Vietnam. CBS anchor Walter Cronkite came out against the war. By March 1968, 500,000 American troops were in Vietnam. Bobby Kennedy announced he would run for president. On March 31, 1968, LBJ made the announcement that shocked the country--he would not run for another term.
Online
2005; 1991
8.
LBJ

LBJ

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Film biography of Lyndon Johnson from his early days in Texas to his withdrawal from politics.
DVD
2000; 1991
Clemons (Stacks)
9.

Kennedy, Johnson, and the Quest for Justice

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Rosenberg discusses the era of Jim Crow in the United States, especially the South, and describes the civil rights movement and the U.S. government's handling of it during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
10.

Underground

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Interweaves the stories of the "Weathermen's" personal political development with the significant events and personalities of that decade.
VHS
1974
Ivy (By Request)
11.

That Memorable Year, 1963

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Shows events that happened in the United States in the year 1963. Covers President John F. Kennedy and the Civil Rights Act; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his "I have a dream speech"; Astronaut Gordon Cooper returns to earth; America listens to the Beatles for the first time; Sonny Liston KO's Floyd Patterson; George Wallace bars black students from entering the University of Alabama; President Kennedy was assassinated; etc.
VHS
1988
Ivy (By Request)
12.

The Making of the President, 1964

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Outlines events in the presidential campaign of 1964, beginning with the early efforts of the supporters of Senator Barry Goldwater and the efforts of liberal Republicans to derail the Goldwater express. Concludes with the victory of Johnson at the polls.
VHS
1965
Ivy (By Request)
13.

LBJ vs. The Kennedys: Chasing Demons

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"With the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, Lyndon Johnson was thrust into the nation's highest office, starting a new chapter in his increasingly bitter feud with the dead president's brother, Robert Kennedy. These two men, who openly despised one another, were now expected to work together to guide the nation through a turbulent time. This episode goes inside the oval office to tell the complete story of this strained relationship, using never-before-heard oral histories and LBJ's White House telephone recordings. See how the Kennedys saw Johnson as a threat to the New Frontier, while Johnson maintained a deep-seated fear of being overshadowed by the Kennedys and their quest to preserve the increasingly mythologized legacy of JFK. Johnson's fear was m [...]
Online
2003
14.

America in the 20th Century: The Sixties

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"In the 1960's, Americans embraced the liberal promises and programs of two presidents: John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. Kennedy, the East Coast blue blood, and Johnson, the rough and tumble Texan, could not have been more different. Yet each embracedthe legacy of Franklin Roosevelt and sought to reshape his 'New Deal' into their own world vision. For Kennedy it was the 'New Fontier.' For Johnson, the 'Great Society.' Each had its triumphs and failures, but together they redefined the role of the federal government in American life and culture."--Original container.
Online
2009
15.

RFK: His Life and Legacy

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Relive the promise of hope and change for the future that was to become the rallying cry of Robert F. Kennedy, the third Kennedy son earmarked for the presidency, in the most complete portrait of the man to date.
DVD
2008
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
16.

Interview With Henry Kissinger, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Henry Kissinger's involvement with Vietnam started before he was Nixon's National Security Advisor. While at Harvard, Kissinger was a consultant on foreign policy to both the White House and State Department and in a 1973 peace agreement, Kissinger helped mediate between Washington and Hanoi. In this interview Kissinger recalls the period before he joined the Nixon White House and how he did not question the United States involvement in Vietnam. In 1965, Kissinger travelled to Vietnam and saw that the war was not winnable in the way it was currently being conducted. Moreover, he had doubts as to whether or not South Vietnam could stand on their own once the United States left. He also describes his impression of Le Duc Tho as someone whose goal was to break the morale and spirit of t [...]
Online
1983
17.

Interview With Henry H. Fowler, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Henry H. Fowler was Secretary of the Treasury under President Johnson from 1965 to 1968. He is asked about the economic consequences of a request to send 206,000 troops to Vietnam in early 1968. He argued at the time that fulfilling such a request would cause significant economic problems. He describes President Johnson as believing bringing peace to Southeast Asia was worth the high fiscal cost--and less expensive than allowing communists to dominate that part of the world. Fowler details the machinations of finding money for the war, both in the Congressional appropriations process and in partnering with other countries on issues such as the price of gold. Fowler describes the tensions the president felt in trying to pay for the war at the same time he wanted to fully fund his Grea [...]
Online
1983
18.

Interview With James Claude Thomson, 1981 [electronic resource]

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James Claude Thomson served as an East Asia Specialist in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. He comments on a lack of expertise on Asia in the US government in the 1950s and 1960s. Thomson helped draft the Tonkin Gulf Resolution, and he recalls the process to get it passed through Congress. He discusses the effects of the Democratic Party's fear of looking soft on Communism on Vietnam, and recalls his dismay at the escalation of the war in 1965.
Online
1983
19.

Interview With John D. Negroponte, 1981 [electronic resource]

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From 1964 to 1968, John Negroponte was Second Secretary in Saigon; from 1968 to 1969, a member of U.S. Delegation to Paris Peace Talks; and from 1970 to 1973, a member of the National Security Council staff. He describes the mood in Paris in 1968 as euphoric, thinking the negotiations for peace with the North Vietnamese would be quick. He discusses President Nixon and Secretary Kissinger's thinking about the negotiations in the context of China and the Soviet Union. He describes the character of Le Duc Tho, who secretly met with Kissinger to help advance the Peace Accords. Negroponte goes into detail about the issue of the withdrawal of North Vietnamese troops from the South. He describes the purpose of the Christmas Bombing of North Vietnam in 1972 and responds to questions about Ni [...]
Online
1983
20.

Interview With McGeorge Bundy [electronic resource]

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McGeorge Bundy, brother of William Bundy, served as National Security Advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson from 1961 to 1966. Here he discusses the Vietnam war under both Presidents, specifically addressing the Tonkin Gulf Incident, and the attack on Pleiku Airbase while he was in Vietnam. He also recounts events around the 1965 decision to increase American troops in Vietnam, and a 1968 meeting of the "Wise Men" where Johnson called in former administration officials for their advice on troop levels and bombing strategies.
Online
1983