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United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865
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41.

The Battle of Chattanooga

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Online
1994
42.

The Civil War [electronic resource]

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An epic documentary bringing life to America's most destructive - and defining - conflict. Here is the saga of celebrated generals and the ordinary soldiers. A heroic and transcendent president and a country that had to divide itself in two in order to become one again.
Online
2002; 1989
43.

Amendment 14 [electronic resource]: Civil Rights of Citizens

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
44.

Amendment 13 [electronic resource]: Abolition of Slavery

This program examines the legal issues relevant to the 13th Amendment and the controversy surrounding its passage. Legal experts explain the basis of the debate; historical reenactments of those debates provide viewers with insights into its social and economic underpinnings.
Online
2007; 1998
45.

Amendments 15 and 24 [electronic resource]: Rights of Citizens to Vote/Poll Tax

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
46.

Presenting Mr. Frederick Douglass [electronic resource]: Lesson of Hour

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass comes back to life in this acclaimed theatrical performance featuring Fred Morsell, as he dramatically re-creates Douglass's famous speech on slavery and human rights. With an eloquence and intelligence rarely matched, Frederick Douglass became a giant in the struggle against racial injustice. He called upon all Americans of every color to work to fulfill the vision of a just society that was proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. This program was filmed at the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church in Washington, D.C., where Douglass delivered his celebrated last speech, "The Lesson of the Hour," over a century ago. A Bill Moyers special.
Online
2005; 1989
47.

The Battle of Glorieta Pass [electronic resource]: Gettysburg of the West

This program uses contemporary journals and letters and battlefield reenactments to focus on the Western strategy in the Civil War and explain one of the most intriguing scenarios in American history. Union forces had abandoned Albuquerque and Santa Fe; the Rebels were headed West, their goal to reach California and secure the Southwest. The brutal Battle of Glorieta Pass on March 28, 1862, concluded when Union men slipped into the Rebel rear and burned the enemy wagon trains. With no more supplies, without food or ammunition, the Confederates abandoned their New Mexico camp: a bitter defeat made even more bitter by history's failure to accord these soldiers their full measure of glory.
Online
2006; 1990
48.

Death Runs Riot [electronic resource]

This program examines the impact of slavery and the Civil War in the West. Viewers learn about "Bleeding Kansas," the "Gettysburg of the West," and how the end of the fighting brought on the beginning of the military campaign against Indians. Included are portrayals of individuals who resisted federal authority, such as Brigham Young and Black Kettle.
Online
1996
49.

Save Our History [electronic resource]: Fight for Honor: Great Civil War Battlefields

For more than a century, Civil War battlefields have stood as important reminders of a time when America, tearing itself apart over sectional differences, nearly ceased to be. But the ever-increasing suburban sprawl along America's eastern seaboard is rapidly encroaching on these hallowed sites. This program travels to the most threatened sites to draw attention to a new war: a struggle between developers hoping to pave over Civil War battlefields and preservationists working to save and restore what is left of them. What does it mean when a country chooses to not preserve certain historic sites? And can its citizens fully comprehend, or honor, the sacrifice of the fallen soldiers without saving the soil where they gave their lives?
Online
2011; 1998
50.

Lincoln [electronic resource]

Burdened by a tragic family life, suicidal urges, and unsettled sexuality, Abraham Lincoln was able to employ his powerful wit and innate charm to transform his inner demons. Filmed as if through the president's own eyes, this episode of Biography captures the dark soul behind one of history's brightest lights. Interviews with leading Lincoln biographers such as Gore Vidal, Jan Morris, and Harold Holzer are also included.
Online
2011; 2006
51.

Geronimo and the Apache Resistance [electronic resource]

For decades in the 19th century, Apache tribes resisted the westward advance of the pioneers and the threat they posed to traditional ways of life. Fighting the longest was Geronimo - one of the most famous, feared, and misunderstood Native American warriors in history. Geronimo and the Apache Resistance, from the PBS American Experience collection, separates myth from reality in the tragic collision of two cultures with dramatically different views of the world - and of each other. It is an illumination of the mysteries of Apache power that made them so terrifying in battle yet so skillful in escaping disaster. In the words of the descendants of those Apaches, the film provides the long-awaited chance to tell their story as it has never been told.
Online
1988
52.

Division [electronic resource]

America became a nation just as a revolution in commerce and industry swept the Western world. This program explores the economic growth of the United States in the context of rising friction between the North and South-over the moral issue of slavery, but also over the differences between industrial power and an agricultural economy focused on cotton. With the election of Abraham Lincoln, Civil War was inevitable.
Online
2011; 2010
53.

Civil War [electronic resource]

The War Between the States rages. In 1863, the Confederate Army seems poised for victory. Following the bloody battle of Antietam, President Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation. Former slaves join the Union army in droves. With superior transportation (railroads), communication (telegraph lines), and battlefield technology, the Union prevails and America is on track to become a global superpower.
Online
2011; 2010
54.

Aftershock [electronic resource]: Beyond the Civil War

When General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, it marked the end of a terrible period of conflict that nearly destroyed the United States. But it also marked the beginning of a period of recovery that was in many ways as painful as the war itself. Freed blacks remained essentially enslaved, and race and tax riots, marauders and insurgents, profiteers, carpetbaggers, the KKK, and Jesse James all contributed to the post-Civil War turmoil. This A & E Special uses dramatizations, archival photos, and meticulous scholarship to show in stunning detail the trials that befell America during the time period known as Reconstruction.
Online
2006
55.

The Lincoln Assassination [electronic resource]

Uncover the events leading up to the tragic assassination of President Abraham Lincoln with this A&E Special. This program untangles the myths and misconceptions, and offers a deeper understanding of the emotional state of the country in April, 1865, that precipitated such an act of violence.
Online
1996
56.

A War to End Slavery [electronic resource]

Heroic soldiers in blue and gray endure the bloodiest battles ever fought on American soil, as the country fights a civil war over the future of slavery. Grim battles unfold: Bull Run, Antietam, and Gettysburg. Famous generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee lead the war between the North and the South. Lincoln speaks eloquently at Gettysburg, and just a year and a half later is brutally assassinated at Ford's Theater.
Online
2002
57.

What Is Freedom? [electronic resource]

In the aftermath of the Civil War, Reconstruction begins as a time of great hope for the devastated South. When political turmoil continues and the Reconstruction efforts fail, a new era of segregation begins. In the Supreme Court decision of Plessy v. Ferguson, 'separate but equal' becomes the law of the land.
Online
2002
58.

Bill Moyers Journal [electronic resource]: Choreographer Bill T. Jones and the Reimagining of Abraham Lincoln

At the close of Abraham Lincoln's bicentennial year, this edition of the Journal takes a different look at America's 16th president-through the eyes of critically acclaimed dance artist Bill T. Jones. In a groundbreaking work of choreography called Fondly Do We Hope...Fervently Do We Pray, Jones reimagines the iconic Lincoln. Bill Moyers speaks with Jones about his creative process, his insights into Lincoln, and how dance can offer a fresh perspective on the man who is arguably the most-studied president in U.S. history.
Online
2009
59.

Buffalo Soldiers [electronic resource]: An American Legacy

By the end of the Civil War, nearly 200,000 black soldiers were serving in the Federal Army. After the war many decided not to return to a life of sharecropping and racial oppression, instead volunteering to battle outlaws and Indian raiders along the western frontier. This program uses dazzling reenactments and the expertise of military historians to tell the multifaceted story of the Buffalo Soldiers, a name given to black troops by their Native American adversaries. Viewers learn about the daily lives and daunting assignments of these proud African-Americans, the harsh environments in which they conducted missions, and the deeds of individual Buffalo Soldiers such as Sgt. Emanuel Stance, Lt. George Burnett, and Henry Flipper - the first black cadet to graduate from West Point, who [...]
Online
2011
60.

Civil War [electronic resource]: Globe Trekker

Megan McCormick travels back in time to the heart of the American Civil War. Lasting 4 years, covering 27 states and costing the lives of 600,000 Americans, the war of 1861-1865 defined the course of American history. Travel to South Carolina slavery plantations, Abraham Lincoln's house in Springfield, Illinois, Fort Sumter and Charleston, Gettysburg, and the haunted confederate base of Farnsworth House. From re-enactments to the Civil War Ball to the prison at Andersonville, Megan sees first hand the kind of conditions that these POW's had to endure. Megan then heads to Cedar Creek to see the re-enactment of a crucial Union victory before travelling to Appomattox, where General Lee surrendered. She finishes her historical tour of the American Civil War by returning to Gettysburg for [...]
Online
2006