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United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865
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1.

The Civil War

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Ken Burns' Emmy Award-winning documentary brings to life America's most destructive and defining conflict. The Civil War is the saga of celebrated generals and ordinary soldiers, a heroic and transcendent president and a country that had to divide itself in two in order to become one.
BookDVD
2011
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
2.

The Civil War [electronic resource]: 1861-1863

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As the Civil War rages, all eyes turn to Vicksburg, where limited war becomes total war. Professor Miller looks at the ferocity of the fighting, at Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and the bitter legacy of the battle, and the war.
Online
2000
3.

Robert E. Lee

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Robert E. Lee, the leading Confederate general of the American Civil War, remains a source of fascination and, for some, veneration. This film examines the life and reputation of the general, whose military successes made him the scourge of the Union and the hero of the Confederacy, and who was elevated to almost god-like status by his admirers after his death.
DVD
2011
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Army Digest: No. 8.

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975.; "'The Mathew Brady Story' brings to the television screen the work of the famed photographer who, during the Civil War, earned the title of "The First Combat Photographer." In this documentary, Brady's crisp visual account of the Civil War and its men is brought to life as music, sound, and movement team up with Brady's photographic skill to give THE BIG PICTURE audience an authentic sense of what it was like to live and fight through the years when our nation's unity hung in the balance. In the "Clara Barton Story," the personal chronicle of the woman who was instrumental in founding the Red Cross - the accounting, in her own words, of her part in a single day of the Battle of Antietam - is documented through scenes [...]
Online
1960
5.

Man, Moment, Machine: Lincoln & the Flying Spying Machine

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"The Civil War isn't typically associated with high-tech equipment, but in 1862 the Union Army introduced an amazing surveillance device that foretold the future of fancy spy gear. This History Channel episode analyzes the device--a hydrogen balloon attached to a telegraph--and chronicles President Lincoln's involvement with its invention and deployment."--History Channel.
Online
2006
6.

Gettysburg Historians' Roundtable

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Online
2006
7.

Battle of Gettysburg

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Online
2004
8.

Weapons of the Civil War

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Online
2008
9.

Civil War Journal: The Commanders

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Through diaries, photographs and re-enactments, these four episodes take the viewer into the personal lives of these Civil War generals.
Online
2001
10.

Civil War Journal

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Through diaries, photograhs, and factual reenactments, these four episodes focus on the earlier years of the Civil War, including John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry; the first military engagement of the war at Fort Sumter; the first major battle at Bull Ron, and the mix of escaped slaves and educated African American men who made up the 65th Massachussetts regiment.
Online
2001; 1993
11.

Destiny at Fort Sumter

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Describes the attack on Fort Sumter that began the Civil War.
Online
1995; 1993
12.

The Battle of Chattanooga

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Online
1994
13.

Amendment 14 [electronic resource]: Civil Rights of Citizens

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
14.

Amendment 13 [electronic resource]: Abolition of Slavery

This program examines the legal issues relevant to the 13th Amendment and the controversy surrounding its passage. Legal experts explain the basis of the debate; historical reenactments of those debates provide viewers with insights into its social and economic underpinnings.
Online
2007; 1998
15.

Amendments 15 and 24 [electronic resource]: Rights of Citizens to Vote/Poll Tax

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
16.

Presenting Mr. Frederick Douglass [electronic resource]: Lesson of Hour

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass comes back to life in this acclaimed theatrical performance featuring Fred Morsell, as he dramatically re-creates Douglass's famous speech on slavery and human rights. With an eloquence and intelligence rarely matched, Frederick Douglass became a giant in the struggle against racial injustice. He called upon all Americans of every color to work to fulfill the vision of a just society that was proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. This program was filmed at the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church in Washington, D.C., where Douglass delivered his celebrated last speech, "The Lesson of the Hour," over a century ago. A Bill Moyers special.
Online
2005; 1989
17.

The Battle of Glorieta Pass [electronic resource]: Gettysburg of the West

This program uses contemporary journals and letters and battlefield reenactments to focus on the Western strategy in the Civil War and explain one of the most intriguing scenarios in American history. Union forces had abandoned Albuquerque and Santa Fe; the Rebels were headed West, their goal to reach California and secure the Southwest. The brutal Battle of Glorieta Pass on March 28, 1862, concluded when Union men slipped into the Rebel rear and burned the enemy wagon trains. With no more supplies, without food or ammunition, the Confederates abandoned their New Mexico camp: a bitter defeat made even more bitter by history's failure to accord these soldiers their full measure of glory.
Online
2006; 1990
18.

Death Runs Riot [electronic resource]

This program examines the impact of slavery and the Civil War in the West. Viewers learn about "Bleeding Kansas," the "Gettysburg of the West," and how the end of the fighting brought on the beginning of the military campaign against Indians. Included are portrayals of individuals who resisted federal authority, such as Brigham Young and Black Kettle.
Online
1996
19.

Save Our History [electronic resource]: Fight for Honor: Great Civil War Battlefields

For more than a century, Civil War battlefields have stood as important reminders of a time when America, tearing itself apart over sectional differences, nearly ceased to be. But the ever-increasing suburban sprawl along America's eastern seaboard is rapidly encroaching on these hallowed sites. This program travels to the most threatened sites to draw attention to a new war: a struggle between developers hoping to pave over Civil War battlefields and preservationists working to save and restore what is left of them. What does it mean when a country chooses to not preserve certain historic sites? And can its citizens fully comprehend, or honor, the sacrifice of the fallen soldiers without saving the soil where they gave their lives?
Online
2011; 1998
20.

Lincoln [electronic resource]

Burdened by a tragic family life, suicidal urges, and unsettled sexuality, Abraham Lincoln was able to employ his powerful wit and innate charm to transform his inner demons. Filmed as if through the president's own eyes, this episode of Biography captures the dark soul behind one of history's brightest lights. Interviews with leading Lincoln biographers such as Gore Vidal, Jan Morris, and Harold Holzer are also included.
Online
2011; 2006