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United States — History — 1969
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1.

Amendment 23 [electronic resource]: D.C. Voting

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
2.

Amendment 26 [electronic resource]: Voting for 18-Year-Olds

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
3.

Amendments 15 and 24 [electronic resource]: Rights of Citizens to Vote/Poll Tax

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
4.

444 Days [electronic resource]: Iran Hostage Crisis

In the words of the U.S. Embassy Communications Officer, being held hostage "was like being raped. Drawing on archival footage-including previously unreleased film from Iran-and candid interviews with the American hostages and their Iranian captors, this riveting program presents a balanced look at the harrowing details of the 14-month standoff that brought radical Islam to world prominence and forever altered America's attitude towards the Middle East. Additional interviews with religious leaders, top-level politicians, military personnel, and others flesh out a story of uncertainty, frustration, and hardship for all involved, which was only resolved with the belated release of the hostages in 1981.
Online
2007; 1998
5.

France-America's Friend? [electronic resource]: The de Gaulle Years

The war in Iraq is not the first time that the U.S. has been at loggerheads with its mercurial ally France. This program presents a vivid account of an earlier troubled phase in Franco-American relations: the critical years from 1961 to 1969. Drawing on recently declassified archival materials as well as on eyewitness accounts from the advisors, colleagues, and ministers of Charles de Gaulle, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, the program depicts JFK's historical visit to France, his discovery of a famously difficult ally in de Gaulle, and the ambiguous relationship that developed between the two countries in the years to come.
Online
2006; 2001
6.

Change, Change [electronic resource]

As this Bill Moyers program makes clear, television became another member of the family in the 1960s, both reflecting and influencing the era. The times were chaotic and TV whirled us into that chaos while also holding up a mirror to it: the assassination and funeral of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Apollo moon landing, the saga of the Civil Rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr. So swiftly was change upon us in the decade of the 60s, so swiftly did the landmarks pass, that all these years later it seems a ride through great upheaval and great promise-some of which was realized and some of which was impossible to fulfill.
Online
2010; 1984
7.

History's Mysteries [electronic resource]: The Greensboro Massacre

This episode of History's Mysteries exposes the gripping, inside account of one of the most shocking crimes in modern American history: the Greensboro Massacre. On November 3, 1979, members of the Communist Worker's Party held a Death to the Klan rally in Greensboro, North Carolina. A caravan of Ku Klux Klansmen and American Nazis drove into the center of the protesters. Screamed insults from both sides escalated into physical confrontation. The Klansmen and Nazis removed an arsenal of weapons from their cars and began firing into the terrified crowd, killing five and wounding eleven.
Online
2011; 2000
8.

Summer of Love [electronic resource]

It was 1967 in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco - a mecca for a visionary new society: one that rejected war, hatred, conformity, and money. And for a brief period, it was the playing field for a new way of life. This PBS American Experience episode is a striking picture of San Francisco's summer of '67 - from the utopian beginnings, when peace and love prevailed, to the chaos, unsanitary conditions, sexual disease, and widespread drug use that ultimately signaled the end. Summer of Love examines the social and cultural forces that sparked the largest migration of young people in America's history, and where the cliché of "Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll," falls short, this film fills in with the more profound new horizons being explored: love, personal growth, mysticism, comm [...]
Online
2007
9.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1962

James Meredith becomes the first African-American to attend the University of Mississippi. This episode of Year by Year: 1962 also looks at John Glenn's orbiting of the earth.
Online
2011; 1996
10.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1963

Year by Year looks back at 1963, John F. Kennedy's assassination, and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famed 'I Have a Dream' speech.
Online
2011; 1996
11.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1964

Lyndon Baines Johnson, LBJ, becomes the 36th President of the United States. Year by Year: 1964 also documents widespread Beatlemania as the Beatles tour the U.S.
Online
2011; 1996
12.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1966

Eugene Cernan, Gemini 9A pilot, takes a two-hour walk in space, the longest to date. This episode of Year by Year also looks at the Vietnam War.
Online
2011; 1996
13.

Superpower [electronic resource]

America's efforts invigorated the struggle against the Nazi stranglehold in Europe. In the Pacific, the ultimate piece of technology ended the war, and a new superpower took the global stage. In this program, many of America's most prominent leaders and personalities reflect on defining moments in the evolution of post-war America-including the Cold War, the space race, the Civil Rights movement, and more.
Online
2011; 2010
14.

The Fateful Decade [electronic resource]: From Little Rock to the Civil Rights Bill

First there was the law, and then there was enforcement of the law. This program begins at Little Rock's Central High School, when soldiers had to provide safety for black children exercising their legal right to go to school. Martin Luther King, Jr., already appears in 1958 at a meeting of black leaders with President Eisenhower. The civil rights movement accelerated: marches, clashes with the police and the jailing of demonstrators, the murder of Medgar Evers, the bombing of the Baptist church in Birmingham, sit-ins and protests, the Montgomery march, the Mississippi Freedom march, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" and "I Have Been to the Mountaintop" speeches, his funeral, and President Johnson's signing of the Civil Rights Bill of 1968.
Online
2007; 1990
15.

The Turbulent Sixties [electronic resource]

This program begins with a fiery speech by Malcolm X that reminds us of the polarization of American political life in the 1960s. Nelson Rockefeller's condemnation of 1968 Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater as a political extremist; Goldwater's rebuttal of the charges; and Ronald Reagan's stump speech in support of Goldwater follow. Robert Kennedy's moving eulogy for Martin Luther King, Jr., concludes the program.
Online
2006; 1995
16.

The U.S. Military [electronic resource]: Waging Peace

This program examines the U.S. role as the world peacekeeper in the post-Cold War era. We learn how the U.S., the world's only remaining superpower, is retraining its forces to maintain peace in volatile areas around the globe. Military experts discuss the difficulties that occur when UN forces intervene in the internal disputes of nations. U.S. peacekeeping missions in Bosnia, Somalia, and other trouble spots are used to demonstrate the pitfalls of humanitarian military operations. A U.S. Army Brigadier General and an expert on international law offer insights into the issue.
Online
2009; 1997
17.

Eugene J. McCarthy [electronic resource]: Muses and Mementos

Congressman, senator, presidential candidate, and author-Eugene McCarthy was all of these, and one of the most progressive public figures of the twentieth century as well. This program offers a fascinating glimpse into the Senator's life, personality, and thinking. In interviews recorded during the last decade of his life, McCarthy muses on a wide range of subjects-from his early years in Minnesota to his experiences as the most prominent antiwar leader of the Vietnam era. The program blends rarely seen archival footage with McCarthy's wry observations, revealing the wit and intellect that set him apart from so many of his fellow politicians.
Online
2006
18.

Madeleine Albright [electronic resource]: Fighting Genocide in Kosovo

For former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, the war in Kosovo was both political and very personal. This program focuses on how America's first female Secretary of State built national and international consensus against Slobodan Milosevic to derail his agenda of ethnic cleansing in the wake of the failed Rambouillet peace negotiations. Albright also discusses the shaping of her values through both her early years of life in the Europe of Hitler and Stalin and her family losses to the Holocaust. Positive comments on what it was like to be a high-ranking woman in the male-dominated world of politics and diplomacy round out the program.
Online
2006; 2005
19.

The Ghosts of My Lai [electronic resource]

On March 16, 1968, at the height of the Vietnam War, American soldiers killed 504 unarmed civilians in the village of My Lai. After a brief overview of the war and the home front backlash against it, this program seeks to understand the massacre and its aftermath through the interwoven narratives of three U.S. soldiers-radioman Fred Widmer, helicopter crewman Larry Colburn, and photographer Ron Haeberle-who were present on that horrific day. The first participated in the slaughter; the second intervened in it; and the third revealed it to the world. In a Pittsburgh classroom and in present-day My Lai, these deeply scarred veterans tell their unforgettable stories with candor, grief, and insight.
Online
2009; 2008
20.

Conversation [electronic resource]: Delany Sisters

In this classic interview with NewsHour correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Having Our Say authors Sarah and Bessie Delany discuss the trials and triumphs of their first 100 years. Their subjects include life in the South for African-Americans in the early 20th century, coping with the implementation of the Jim Crow laws, and bigotry in the North. Bessie touches on what it was like to grow up with a father who recalled slavery and the arrival of freedom after the Confederate surrender. Sarah tells how, as a young woman, she defended herself against a drunk white man at a Georgia train station and how she found ways around the institutionalized racism in New York City's education system.
Online
2009; 1994