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1.

Republican Congress, the

Former Secretary of Labor and university professor Robert Reich talks about the abrupt changes that took place when the Republicans gained control of Congress in the 1994 congressional elections. "I had to stop a lot of bad things from happening and guard my programs, make sure that decisions that had been made were going to stick," Secretary Reich recalls.
Online
2015; 2011
2.

Politics of Diplomacy, the

Former Secretary of State James A. Baker recounts his experience joining with the Foreign Minister of the Soviet Union to condemn the Iraq invasion of Kuwait in 1990.
Online
2015; 2011
3.

Liberals Hold the Moral High Ground: A Debate

Do conservative or liberal philosophies lead to more just outcomes? Opposing definitions of morality have long fueled debate over America’s policy goals and national identity. For conservatives, morality is often grounded in ideals such as patriotism, including a respect for order and authority; fairness and liberty in the sense that an individual’s actions yield just rewards, or consequences; and reverence for the sanctity of religious and ethical traditions. For liberals, morality is often grounded in ideals such as compassion and caring for the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized; on fairness in the sense of redressing both historic wrongs and current inequalities of outcome; and on generosity extending beyond the bounds of nations or cultures. In today’s divisive politi [...]
Online
2018; 2017
4.

Bill Moyers Journal: Robert Bly and Grace Lee Boggs

The poetry of Robert Bly explores startling truths at the heart of American culture and spirituality. Bill Moyers talks with the celebrated author about his life in letters—during which Bly has produced more than thirty books, including the National Book Award winner The Light Around the Body, in addition to cofounding American Writers Against the Vietnam War in 1966. Bly also discusses his 1990 work Iron John: A Book About Men—an international best-seller which has been translated into several languages. In a subsequent segment, the program features another evocative conversation with civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs. Broadcast date: August 31, 2007. (58 minutes)
Online
2016; 2007
5.

Truth and Lies: Watergate

A scandal surrounding the highest office in the United States shook the nation and ultimately led to the resignation of a president. This video shows exclusive interviews, photos, and footage related to the Nixon Watergate scandal.
Online
2017
6.

Bill Moyers Journal: Parker Palmer on Spiritual Wholeness / Robert G. Kaiser on Washington Lobbyist Culture

In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers sits down with Parker Palmer, founder of the Center for Courage & Renewal, for a conversation about maintaining spiritual wholeness even as the economy and political order seem to be coming apart. Moyers also talks with The Washington Post’s Robert G. Kaiser, author of So Damn Much Money: The Triumph of Lobbying and the Corrosion of American Government, about how the nation’s Capital has succumbed to lobbyists and turned government into big business. An essay on the likely cost—in dollars and blood—of sending a surge of additional troops into Afghanistan concludes the program. Broadcast date: February 20, 2009. (57 minutes)
Online
2016; 2009
7.

Easy Days and Hard Days

Former White House press secretary Mike McCurry recalls that his easiest days were those when there was only one topic on the mind of reporters in the White House press briefings. Mr. McCurry says his greatest challenge on those occasions was figuring out how to creatively say "no comment" every way imaginable. The hardest days were the "quiet" days when there was no single topic on everyone's mind. "And those were the very difficult days, because you had to be on top of sixteen different issues at once," Mr. McCurry says.
Online
2015; 2011
8.

Bill Moyers Journal: Healthcare Reform

In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers is joined by policy analysts and physicians Sidney Wolfe of Public Citizen and David Himmelstein of Physicians for a National Health Program for a frank discussion about the political and logistical feasibility of a single-payer healthcare system in a time of economic distress and government domination by lobbyists. In addition, Moyers speaks with advocate Donna Smith about how the nation’s broken healthcare system hurts ordinary Americans. A Memorial Day essay on the importance of reflecting upon wars in their totality is also included. Broadcast date: May 22, 2009. (57 minutes)
Online
2016; 2009
9.

Bill Moyers Journal: Historian Thomas Cahill / Archbishop Desmond Tutu

“We as a country are actually sacrificing children to an evil God,” says historian and death penalty critic Thomas Cahill. In an interview that takes viewers from the Roman Coliseum to death row in Texas, Bill Moyers talks with the author of How the Irish Saved Civilization about capital punishment and its place in American culture. Discussing his most recent project—a book about a young defendant put to death after a questionable trial—Cahill asks us to acknowledge a brutality that lives as much “inside of us” as it does in our legal system. Also on the program: an essay on Pakistan and a look at a past interview with Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Broadcast dates: November 9, 2007, and December 28, 2007. (58 minutes)
Online
2016; 2007
10.

Investment and Productivity

Former Secretary of Labor and university professor Robert Reich talks about what the United States can do to be more successful competing on the world economic stage. He says that rather than reducing wages to be more competitive internationally, the U.S. needs to increase worker productivity by improving worker education and training.
Online
2015; 2011
11.

What Would Teddy Do?

Throughout the 2016 American Presidential election, controversy, pessimism, and fear for the nation's future have dominated the headlines. Americans long for a hero to set them back on course... a dynamic, courageous, and incorruptible leader who truly believes America can be great again - someone, in fact, just like Teddy Roosevelt. But if he were in the White House today, how would Teddy handle bitterly divisive issues like gun control, climate change, income inequality, and political dysfunction? What Would Teddy Do? asks these very questions, while consulting some of America's most prominent politicians, historians, and public figures.
Online
2017; 2016
12.

How Abraham Lincoln Shaped American Politics and Popular Culture (2/20/12)

On this Presidents Day, Hari Sreenivasan and historian Richard Norton Smith discuss President Lincoln's influence on American politics and popular culture as they tour the Ford's Theatre's new Center for Education and Leadership dedicated to the president.
Online
2017; 2012
13.

Paying Down the National Debt

Director of the National Economic Council and former Secretary of the Treasury Lawrence Summers talks about the importance of paying down the debt, particularly because the United States is, ". . . a country that chronically under saves."
Online
2015; 2011
14.

Bill Moyers Journal: Democratic Direction / Southern and Swing State Politics

What did the Democrats accomplish at the Democratic National Convention, and can they deliver real change while still playing old-fashioned Beltway politics? In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers sits down with Katrina vanden Heuvel, editor of The Nation, and the University of Pennsylvania's Adolph Reed Jr. to discuss the promises from the DNC and expectations of Barack Obama. Moyers also speaks with political analysts Merle and Earl Black about how U.S. demographics-particularly the Southern and swing states-will likely influence the 2008 presidential campaign and election. A Labor Day essay on the declining state of labor unions concludes the program. Broadcast date: August 29, 2008. (57 minutes)
Online
2016; 2008
15.

Bill Moyers Journal: Philippe Sands on Torture / Nurses on Healthcare

When it comes to interrogation methods, does the end ever really justify the means? In this program, Bill Moyers interviews international law professor Philippe Sands, author of Torture Team: Rumsfeld’s Memo and the Betrayal of American Values, about his book on the approval of coercive interrogation by high-ranking U.S. officials. This edition of the Journal also reports on the fight the California Nurses Association has been waging for universal healthcare, their proposed answer to a medical system that covers some people better than others—and many not at all. Broadcast date: May 9, 2008. (57 minutes)
Online
2016; 2008
16.

Why the GOP Sucks at Courting Millennials: 'The Selfie Vote' Author Kristin Soltis Anderson

Republican pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson, author of The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials are Leading America (And How Republicans Can Keep Up) speaks with Reason TV's Nick Gillespie about her impressions of the millennial generation, how they use social media, and how political parties can best reach out to them. A Reason TV production.
Online
2016; 2015
17.

Bill Moyers Journal: Health Care and Finance Reform

The road to health care reform is littered with casualties—most of them President Obama’s progressive allies. In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers is joined by Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, and The Nation’s John Nichols to take a closer look at the newly signed reform legislation and explore why some say that reform is not yet done. In addition, Moyers speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gretchen Morgenson for a candid examination of the obstacles facing substantive finance reform and what Washington’s proposed legislation would—and would not—accomplish. The program concludes with an essay that conjures the spirit of 19th-century satirist Ambrose Bierce as it decries the pernicious influence of moneyed interests on health care and f [...]
Online
2016; 2010
18.

The Big Burn

Inspired by Timothy Egan’s best-selling book, “The Big Burn” is the dramatic story of an unimaginable wildfire that swept across the Northern Rockies in the summer of 1910. The fire devoured more than three million acres in 36 hours, confronting the fledgling U.S. Forest Service with a catastrophe that would define the agency and the nation’s fire policy for the rest of the 20th century and beyond. As America tries to manage its fire-prone landscapes in the 21st century, this film provides a cautionary tale of heroism and sacrifice, arrogance and greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility, in the face of nature’s frightening power. Distributed by PBS Distribution.
Online
2015; 2014
19.

Will the Tech Bubble Burst?: Dan Rather Reports

On this episode of Dan Rather Reports, millions of dollars are pouring into tech start-ups, all hoping to be the next Facebook. But will boom turn to bust? Also, was a government agency too aggressive pursuing commercial fishermen?
Online
2016; 2011
20.

Big Noise Dispatches No. 5

Dispatches No. 5 provides groundbreaking anti-propaganda news from the Middle East to the American Midwest.
Online
2017; 2010