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1.

Lost Cannibals of Europe [electronic resource]

Cannibalism has long been considered a dark, if isolated occurrence in human history. Now science uncovers an ancient Germanic culture known for systematically consuming its fellow man. Witness the first of the Earth's Neolithic farmers and the burial pit they left behind, found filled with expertly butchered human remains. Archaeologists have never seen anything like it. Is it possible that cannibals are hidden in Europe's ancestral closet? An ongoing investigation into Stone Age farming communities in Germany prompts an excavation 15 miles from the border of France, where fertile topsoil conceals the remains of a culture's gruesome relationship to the human body. A history of mass graves, surgical procedure, human sacrifice, and faith, this film explores the possibility of cannibal [...]
Online
2010
2.

The Hamar and Karo Tribes [electronic resource]: The Search for Mingi

Ethiopia's closely allied Hamar and Karo share many practices that help to sustain their traditional lifestyles. This program enters the world of these warrior peoples through their attentiveness toward mingi, or imperfection, and the bullah, a coming-of-age ceremony in which a young man hurdles a group of tethered bulls after a female relative, in a demonstration of respect for him, has invited other male family members to whip her. The role of the village metalworker, whose craft is prized and yet who is required to live apart from Hamar society, is also examined.
Online
2000
3.

The Mursi Tribe [electronic resource]: The Day of the Donga

Much has changed in modern Ethiopia, but at least one thing remains the same: the Mursi are still among the fiercest warriors in Africa. This program, a study of life among the Mursi, features footage of a donga, a punishing yet graceful stick fighting competition through which young men display their bravery, establish their status, and perhaps even attract a young woman to marry. Mursi mysticism and faith healing are also considered, as well as customs such as the use of large ceramic lip disks by women as symbols of beauty and wealth.
Online
2000
4.

Burma's Forbidden Island [electronic resource]

In this program, we'll meet an extraordinary people whose culture is threatened by extinction in the modern era. For centuries, a remarkable group of seafaring nomads known as the Moken have lived quietly in the idyllic Megui Archipelago off the southern coast of Myanmar-also known as Burma-sleeping on their boats and existing in harmony with the natural world. The functionalism and simplicity of this life has depended on the isolation of its adaptable practitioners, and their ability to navigate new surroundings with ease and safety. Now though, the peace has been shattered, and the islands and their people are under threat from loggers, fishermen, entrepreneurs, and Myanmar's military government. This program examines the Moken people's struggle to survive in a harsh modern world a [...]
Online
2004
5.

Moche Human Sacrifice [electronic resource]

Forensic anthropologist John Verano has been called to solve a nearly 2,000-year-old mystery of gruesome proportions. Mass graves have been discovered at an ancient Peruvian temple complex known as the Temple of the Moon, and the remains there shout accusations of violent ritual sacrifice. The Moche-a pre-Columbian agricultural civilization thriving from 100 BC to AD 800-are one of the best-known pre-Columbian cultures of South America. These remarkable people were at one point the dominant culture on the north coast of Peru. Human skeletons found within a chamber used for an ancient human sacrifice rite, called the presentation, will astound you. This offering site acts as a sacrificial chamber or passageway at the Huaca Bandera archaeological site. Joining a crack team of archeolog [...]
Online
2002
6.

Crafts and Crafts People [electronic resource]

Adesuwa, age 10, and Akugbe, age 11, are going to have new party dresses made. They choose a tie-dyed fabric, and we learn how it is made. We also learn how the famous bronzes were cast. They are still being made in the traditional way, although the hand-pumped bellows has been replaced by an automobile battery-powered fan. Today's chief bronze caster narrates the dance drama that explains how the bronze casters became the most important craft guild in Benin.
Online
1994
7.

Home to the Village [electronic resource]

Most urban Nigerians retain strong ties to their home villages. Many, like the Izevbigie family, return for planting and harvesting-suitcase farming, it's called. This program compares the life of the city-dwelling Izevbigies with that of their country cousins, as well as the games they play. Grandmother tells the story of the treasure at the end of the rainbow.
Online
1994
8.

Sorcerers of Zaire [electronic resource]

For the rural Chokwe tribe of southwestern Zaire, hardship and starvation are a way of life. The mood in their villages is one of austerity and mystery. To assure that their modest food supply is distributed fairly, the Chokwe use a complex system of reprisals in which sorcerers are hired to resurrect ancestral ghosts to haunt those who hoard goods, causing them illness and death. This program, from the award-winning producers of Healers of Ghana, focuses on four patients and two healers, following them through their traditional medical treatments. The program also observes the rigorous initiation ritual in which masked dancers help prepare boys for manhood.
Online
1993
9.

Land of the Dogon [electronic resource]: World Heritage in Peril

With its traditional peak-roofed huts nestled along the Cliff of Bandiagara, the Dogon people's homeland looks idyllic, like something from a child's storybook. But the Dogons are facing real-world problems. Fear of al Qaeda keeps tourists away, the younger generation is bored and restless, and precious artifacts are disappearing, though UNESCO has made this part of Mali a World Heritage Site. This extraordinary program immerses viewers in Dogon village life as farmers, tour guides, and elders discuss the challenges of modernization. The film captures Dogon efforts to protect their famed wooden sculptures, with the help of a local museum; in addition, villagers open up about myths and rituals in a land where ancient indigenous beliefs, Islam, and Christianity continue to coexist.
Online
2012
10.

Lost Mummies of New Guinea [electronic resource]

Embark on an expedition to Papua New Guinea to understand human mummification. Our goal is to find a well-preserved mummy to gain clues into this incredible form of mummification in the tropics. Preserving bodies so their spirits can act as protection for the living, the practice all but died out as missionaries spread Christianity to remote communities in the 1950s. Now, we'll travel to Koke, a native village with an ancient mummy tradition, to learn about their process of mummification and assist with the restoration of an aging mummy. Led by photographer Ulla Lohmann, this film takes an in-depth look at the macabre art of mummification. Plus, discover how bodies can be preserved for decades in the hot and humid climate of the island, and witness the restoration of existing mummies [...]
Online
2010
11.

The Afar Tribe [electronic resource]: A Bride's Story

This program provides an introduction to the Afar by recording two major life events: the arranged marriage of a most reluctant bride and the initiation of a nervous would-be warrior. Can Fatuma, daughter of the clan chief, steel herself to marry her first cousin Ali, or will she seek escape - perhaps through suicide? And will Mohammed be able to retain his stoic poise during his ritual circumcision? The Afar belief system, a blend of Islam and ancient traditions that underpins these crucial events, is explored.
Online
2000
12.

Human Rights and Land Rights [electronic resource]

The Waiapi are nomads who migrate through the virgin forests in northern Brazil that have faced the encroachment of loggers and developers. With the help of human rights groups they managed to gain legal title to their traditional lands. Filmmaker Geoffrey O'Connor's Academy Award-nominated documentary, "At the Edge of Conflict" offers an inside look at their struggle. This episode focuses on the fight of indigenous peoples of the world to remain on their land. With development due to globalization increasing in traditionally tribal countries, the indigenous population is being pushed onto smaller parcels of land in the name of economic development.
Online
1995
13.

The Wodaabe and Tuareg Nomads [electronic resource]: Stealing Beauty

Though sometimes in conflict with each other, the Wodaabe and Tuareg have a common enemy in the arid lands of central western Africa they call home. Filmed in part during the height of the dry season, this program offers insights into both of these warrior tribes through two of their major celebrations. For the polygynous Wodaabe it is the worso, a flamboyant courtship festival that frequently ends in the "abduction" of an additional wife. And for the matrilineal Tuareg, it is a festival featuring camel racing and dancing. The vital importance of water to the survival of both peoples is underscored.
Online
2000
14.

Bridge the Gap to Pine Ridge [electronic resource]: A Visit With the Oglala Lakota People

Actor and activist Chris Bashinelli is on a mission to learn from cultures that many Westerners know little about. His method? Live among those communities and get to know the people in them. Sometimes that means traveling to the other side of the planet, but in this program Bashinelli visits the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, home of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, also known as the Oglala Lakota. While there, he embarks on a life-changing two-day buffalo harvest, gets "schooled" by the girl's basketball team, meets a 14-year-old who has devoted her life to suicide prevention, and finds himself shoulder-deep in a cow's backside while trying to better understand employment issues on the reservation. With humor and pathos, Bashinelli discovers stories of hope and learns how th [...]
Online
2012
15.

Indigenous People [electronic resource]

Under constant threat of losing their land to corporate agriculture and federal government ownership, native Hawaiians in Papakolea petitioned Congress to protect their land under the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act. The appeal gained the support of FDR and the U.S. Congress. Their 1930s victory continues to affect the lives of Hawaiians to this day while their determination to keep their culture alive is told by the few surviving elders. This episode examines the impact this decision made on native Hawaiian culture and heritage and the struggle to preserve what land still remains. Also, the discovery of gold and its extraction threatens the lives and culture of the T`boli people of the Philippines, and a celebration of indigenous people from around the world at the Earth Summit in Rio [...]
Online
1993
16.

Maori Land Protests [electronic resource]: Hikoi and Bastion Point

The 1970s was a period of great social and political upheaval around the world, including the push for indigenous equality and land rights. The protest movement launched by the Maori peoples of New Zealand was the result of a culmination of grievances dating back to the signing of the treaty of Waitangi in 1840. This documentary explores the reasons for the 1970s Maori protest movement, the 1975 Hikoi protest march, and the Occupation of Bastion Point in 1977, and also covers how Aotearoa-New Zealand has changed since the protests. Interviews with New Zealand historians Claudia Orange, Dr. Benjamin Pittman, and Mark Derby provide an overview of the key protests and their enduring significance.
Online
2013
17.

The Treaty of Waitangi [electronic resource]: An Introduction

Reaching agreement on the legal meaning and the "spirit" of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand's founding document, has led to fierce debate and violent conflict between European settlers and the Maori peoples since its signing in 1840. This program examines the events leading up to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, consequences of the signing, the key points of difference in the two versions of the treaty, the treaty in the twentieth century, and the founding of the Waitangi Tribunal. The video is an excellent resource for students of New Zealand history as well as indigenous rights studies.
Online
2013
18.

Medicine [electronic resource]

We often think of modern medicine as only really beginning at the Renaissance - but we're wrong. The Edwin Smith Papyrus is an ancient textbook on surgery that dates back to about 1600 BC. It is full of details on the examination, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of numerous ailments. This film looks into the grisly but brilliant surgeries of the great ancient physicians to witness three procedures common at the time but which would not be attempted successfully again for nearly 2,000 years?
Online
2002
19.

Warfare [electronic resource]

Much of our modern weaponry has its roots in the ancient world. This film explores the world of ancient warfare and the weapons used. The Greek fire was a forerunner to today's flamethrower, the Roman ballista may have been the first missile, and siege towers evolved into modern day tanks. For all our technological advances, the weapons used to wage war really haven't changed all that much?
Online
2002
20.

Ancient Ships [electronic resource]

Some ancient shipbuilding techniques are still used today. This film uncovers the revolutionary work of ancient shipbuilders whose vessels rival modern cruise liners in their scale and opulence. Including a Nemi ship dragged from the depths of an Italian lake, these ships of the Roman Empire were elaborate, floating palaces with heating and plumbing?
Online
2002