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161.

Responding to Writing [electronic resource]: Peer to Peer

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Reveals how peer response can help young adolescents develop as thinkers and writers. Participants explore strategies for structuring peer interactions and for teaching students to respond positively and productively to each other's work.
Online
2004
162.

Teaching the Power of Revision [electronic resource]

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Visits three classrooms to examine strategies that help even reluctant writers see the power and purpose of revision.
Online
2004
163.

Engagement and Dialogue [electronic resource]: Julia Alvarez, James McBride, Lensey Namioka, and More

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In New York City, Carol O'Donnell and her students explore themes of multiple worlds and dual identities in multicultural literature. They read poetry by Diana Chang and Naomi Shihab Nye; the novel, "The Color of Water" by James McBride, essays and short stories by Gish Jen, Khoi Luu, Lensey Namioka, and Julia Alvarez, and a monologue by Tina Lee. Through a series of innovative drama, role-playing, and writing activities, students examine the social and cultural experiences of the characters, and reflect on their own definitions and experiences of identity.
Online
2005
164.

Engagement and Dialogue [electronic resource]: Judith Ortiz Cofer and Nikki Grimes

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The workshop begins with a profile of the writer Judith Ortiz Cofer and then moves to Vista, California, where Akiko Morimoto and her students read short stories from Cofer's collection, An Island Like You. They respond personally to the works, examine the author's use of figurative language, and then make intertextual connections with books they've read throughout the school year. In a culminating project, students create their own visual symbols to represent the characters and events in the text. Students then explore poems from Nikki Grimes's Bronx Masquerade and examine the writer's craft. Grimes visits the classroom, answers questions about her work, and attends an after-school reading of student poetry.
Online
2005
165.

Research and Discovery [electronic resource]: Shirley Sterling and Laura Tohe

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At the Skokomish reservation in Washington state, Sally Brownfield and her students study and connect with the literature and issues related to the Native American boarding school program. Students use Shirley Sterling's novel, "My Name Is Seepeetza" and the poetry of Laura Tohe as the lenses through which they explore topics of their choosing. The class visits the Skokomish Tribal Center to interview tribal elders about the impact of the residential boarding program on the community. Author Shirley Sterling visits the class and answers student questions related to her novel, her life, and their personal research topics. Students then decide how to make their learning public.
Online
2005
166.

Research and Discovery [electronic resource]: Edwidge Danticat, an Na, Laurence Yep, and More

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In Clayton, Missouri, Kathryn Mitchell Pierce's students read works that explore issues of historical and contemporary immigration. Pierce uses multicultural picture books to introduce students to a wide range of perspectives and to set the stage for their novel study. In literature groups, students discuss novels by Edwidge Danticat, Laurence Yep, Walter Dean Myers, Pam Munoz-Ryan, and An Na. In culminating presentations, students synthesize themes and pose thought-provoking questions that invite others to examine these novels in new ways. This workshop features author profiles of Laurence Yep and Edwidge Danticat.
Online
2005
167.

Historical and Cultural Context [electronic resource]: Christopher Paul Curtis

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Laina Jones and her students in Dorchester, Massachusetts, explore "The Watsons Go to Birmingham 1963" by Christopher Paul Curtis. Jones uses non-fiction, documentary film, and historical photographs to contextualize the events in the novel and the Civil Rights movement. The students make deep connections to the literature through drama, poetry, and creative writing activities. Curtis visits the classroom, addresses questions, and leads students in a writing workshop. The unit culminates with a service learning project in which students create children s books about the Civil Rights movement and share them with elementary school children.
Online
2005
168.

Historical and Cultural Context [electronic resource]: Langston Hughes and Christopher Moore

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Stanlee Brimberg and his students in New York City study the important contributions of African Americans to the United States and the recent discovery of the African Burial Ground in Manhattan through factual texts, video, art, photography, and poetry. The students interview writer, historian, and documentary filmmaker Christopher Moore to learn more about the everyday experiences of African slaves in early New York. They examine the works of Langston Hughes, and then drawing on all of the texts they write their own poetry and engage in peer review. As a culminating activity, the students take a field trip to the African Burial Ground Memorial, and then design their own postage stamps to commemorate the site.
Online
2005
169.

Social Justice and Action [electronic resource]: Alma Flor Ada, Pam Muñoz Ryan, and Paul Yee

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Laura Alvarez and her students in Oakland, California, examine different perspectives and experiences of immigrants, and then formulate and defend positions on issues to which they connect personally. They examine works including "My Name Is Maria Isabel" by Alma Flor Ada, "Esperanza Rising" by Pam Muñoz Ryan, and "Tales From Gold Mountain" by Paul Yee to compare characters hopes, expectations, and actual experiences upon arriving in the United States. Students conduct research, including interviews with family members and nonfiction readings. Dr. Alma Flor Ada visits the classroom, answers questions about her novel, and facilitates discussion about social justice and taking action for change. As a culminating project, students write and revise persuasive letters to raise public awa [...]
Online
2005
170.

Social Justice and Action [electronic resource]: Joseph Bruchac and Francisco Jiménez

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Workshop begins with profiles of the featured authors, and then moves on to Chicago, Illinois where Lisa Espinosa's students explore themes of representation through literature, documentary film, photography, and music. Students look critically at past and current media depictions of African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans, and examine ways in which artists and writers from within those cultural groups, including Joseph Bruchac and Francisco Jimenez, represent themselves. The students analyze the individual works, make comparisons across texts, and make connections to their own lives. In a culminating project, students represent their own experience, using black-and-white photography and essays as social commentary. Teachers, family, and community members join together at a [...]
Online
2005
171.

In Search of the Novel: 9-10 Authors' Notes [electronic resource]

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In this supplement to "In Search of the Novel", contemporary authors, including Orson Scott Card, Horton Foote, Ernest Gaines, Arthur Golden, Daniel Keyes, Katherine Paterson, J. K. Rowling, and Leslie Marmon Silko, reveal even more of their own writing process. Guided by thematic questions, they discuss everything from how they first conceived their novels to what it s like to be a writer and how they imagine teachers should teach their works.
Online
2000
172.

Agricultural and Urban Revolutions [electronic resource]

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What do historians know about the earliest farmers and herders, and the evolution of cities? Newly emerging evidence about the "cradles of civilization" is examined in light of the social, technological, and cultural complexity of recently discovered settlements and cities. Archaeologist, Steve Weber, discusses the role of archaeology in the study of history, and how improvements in archaeological techniques affect our views of the past.
Online
2004
173.

Early Belief Systems [electronic resource]

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How did people begin to understand themselves in relation to the natural world and to the unseen realms beyond, and how was religion a community experience? In this unit, animism and shamanism in Shinto are contrasted with philosophical and ethical systems in early Greece and China, and the beginnings of Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, and Judaism. Candice Goucher talks about the ways in which historians evaluate prehistoric rock art to draw hypotheses about the nature of early religion.
Online
2004
174.

Order and Early Societies [electronic resource]

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Through the rise of the Chinese empire, Mayan regional kingdoms, and the complex society of Igbo Ukwu, this unit considers the origins of centralized bureaucratic empires, regional kingdoms and a decentralized way or ordering society. Linda Walton discusses the rise of gender inequality through the example of the Neolithic Hongshan culture of northeastern China, whose archeological sites contain remarkable evidence of important female imagery.
Online
2004
175.

The Spread of Religions [electronic resource]

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Shows how, as the missionaries, pilgrims, and converts of Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam moved around the world, the religions created change and were themselves changed. In conclusion, Linda Walton talks about the movement of religion via diasporas and the religious syncretism that follows.
Online
2004
176.

Early Economies [electronic resource]

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A comparison of manorial economies in Japan and medieval Europe is contrasted with the tribute economy of the Incas. The experience of dramatic economic change is illustrated by the commercial revolution in China. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the economic effects of landholding by religious institutions.
Online
2004
177.

Connections Across Land [electronic resource]

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Shows that land-based trade routes were conduits of commerce and culture. Traces the transmission of commodities, religions, diseases and people along the Eurasian Silk Roads, the trans-Saharan gold roads and the Meso-American turquoise roads. Concludes with Jerry H. Bentley's views of the destructive forces of major trade routes and their effects on the connected societies.
Online
2004
178.

Connections Across Water [electronic resource]

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Traces how the traders of the Indian Ocean, the early Mississippians, and the Norsemen carried death and disease, skills and technologies, philosophies and religion down rivers and across oceans. Concludes with Candice Goucher discussing the conflict between advances in underwater archaeology and the speculative private industry that fuels much of this expensive work.
Online
2004
179.

Early Empires [electronic resource]

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Through the Mongol empire, the Mali empire, and the Inca empire, examines the construction of empires, their administrative structures, legitimating ideologies, and the environmental and technological conditions that shaped them. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the contradictory legacies of empires through the example of the Incas in modern day Peru.
Online
2004
180.

Transmission of Traditions [electronic resource]

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Islamic Spain, Korea, and West Africa provide examples of many different modes of cultural transmission, including oral, written, artistic, and architectural styles that are adopted internationally. Concludes with Richard W. Bulliet's views of the beneficial results of historical events that prevent the transmission of traditions, as exemplified in the expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain.
Online
2004