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21.

Rising and Sinking [electronic resource]

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Participants generalize the model that has been developed about what rises and what sinks, using the idea of balance of forces.
Online
2004
22.

Heat and Temperature [electronic resource]

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Participants focus on the difference between heat and temperature, and examine how both are defined in terms of particles. The particle model is then used to explain a number of everyday phenomena, from why things expand when they are heated to the role that temperature plays in changes of state.
Online
2004
23.

Density and Pressure [electronic resource]

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Participants examine density, an essential property of matter. They also look at how particles of matter are in constant motion, which leads to a deeper understanding of fluid pressure. Lastly, the concepts of pressure and density are investigated to explain the macroscopic phenomenon of rising and sinking.
Online
2004
24.

Extending the Particle Model of Matter [electronic resource]

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Participants extend their understanding of the particle model to explain additional macroscopic phenomena, including the electrical properties of matter. Participants review the progression of ideas covered in the course and anticipate future developments in the understanding of matter.
Online
2004
25.

Principles of Artful Teaching [electronic resource]

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Program opens with teachers sharing passionate insights about why they teach the arts to young people. Then short classroom segments illustrate how arts teachers employ seven principles of artful teaching to meet the needs and imaginations of their students. Workshop participants explore how these principles can affect their own teaching. Subsequent sessions will examine each principle in depth, with examples from dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Online
2005
26.

Developing Students as Artists [electronic resource]

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Participants explore how arts teachers help students develop knowledge and fundamental skills while providing opportunities for creativity and independence. First, a dance teacher gives senior students leadership responsibilities and coaches them in their choreography projects. Then a theatre teacher mentors stagecraft students who are responsible for the technical aspects of a dance concert. In an intermediate visual art course, a teacher builds on students prior learning in a foundation course. Finally, a vocal music teacher works with two classes: students learning to read music and an advanced jazz ensemble.
Online
2005
27.

Addressing the Diverse Needs of Students [electronic resource]

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Participants meet a visiting theatre artist who takes advantage of the different backgrounds and learning styles of ninth-graders to help them understand and embrace the playwriting process. A visual art teacher brings top honors art students and students with disabilities together, so they can learn from each other. As a music teacher works with different classes, but addresses needs common to all students. Finally, in a movement class for non-dance majors, teachers help students explore human anatomy.
Online
2005
28.

Choosing Instructional Approaches [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates that Arts teachers take on a variety of roles, and use many different instructional techniques as they engage with their students; that they can be instructors, mentors, directors, coaches, artists, performers, collaborators, facilitators, critics, or audience members. In this session, participants follow a vocal music teacher as she takes on different roles in order to encourage students to find creative solutions to artistic challenges. Next, an acting teacher becomes a facilitator as his students report on research about theatre history. Then a visual art teacher guides her students in a drawing assignment, varying her approach based on the students individual needs. Finally, two dance teachers engage students in critical analysis of a painting, as a way to encourage [...]
Online
2005
29.

Creating Rich Learning Environments [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how Arts teachers create a safe environment where students feel free to express their thoughts and feelings and take creative risks. In this session, participants meet an Acting I teacher help students let go of their inhibitions and an Acting II teacher encourage students to take creative risks as they interpret monologues. In a dance class, a teacher asks students to work closely in pairs so they can study subtle aspects of movement technique. In a visual art department, the teachers work together to create a community that gives students multiple outlets for artistic learning. Finally, a music teacher builds his students confidence and skills as they learn the basics of improvisational singing.
Online
2005
30.

Fostering Genuine Communication [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how Arts teachers communicate with students, and students communicate with each other, in respectful ways that encourage communication of original ideas through the arts. Participants meet a dance teacher whose students draw choreographic inspiration from poetry and sign language. A visual art teacher gives her commercial art class a fanciful assignment that enables them to communicate a concrete idea through several visual media. A theatre teacher encourages student interaction around the dramatization and staging of fables. Finally, a vocal music teacher asks her students to use descriptive praise to critique the performance of a fellow singer.
Online
2005
31.

Nurturing Independent Thinkers [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how Arts teachers use formal and informal strategies to assess their students progress and to modify their own teaching practices. Participants meet a vocal music teacher who splits his choir into groups that give each other feedback; he also has students tape-record themselves during rehearsal, so he can judge their individual progress. A dance teacher critiques original choreography by a student and asks her peers to participate in the process; this feedback helps the student deepen the impact of her work. Next, theatre teachers give an in-depth critique to a student, and then ask him for feedback on their teaching. Finally, a visual art teacher helps students develop their observation and analysis skills throughout their high school careers, so they learn to be their [...]
Online
2005
32.

Making the Most of Community Resources [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how Arts teachers can develop relationships with community members and organizations by bringing artists into the classroom, taking students beyond school walls, and asking students to draw inspiration from the voices of their community. Participants observe a guest choreographer who challenges the students with her working style and expectations. A visiting theatre artist helps playwriting students develop monologues based on interviews with people in the neighborhood. A visual art teacher and her students work with community members to create a sculpture garden in an empty courtyard at their school, drawing inspiration from a nearby sculpture park. A band teacher invites alumni and local professional musicians to sit in with her classes, giving students strong musical [...]
Online
2005
33.

Visual Arts [electronic resource]

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Reveals how paintings, sculpture, and other works of visual art express ideals in their own language. Demonstrates how to identify the style, form, and subject matter of appropriate works to help draw out the cultural setting of literary texts.
Online
2003
34.

Political History [electronic resource]

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Explains how speeches, protest posters, and cartoons capture the political views of various groups. Pairing the study of literature with close readings of appropriate political artifacts, this session demonstrates how to comprehend the place and time of a text.
Online
2003
35.

Social History [electronic resource]

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Introduces the discipline of social history, which focuses on the lives of ordinary people. Demonstrates how to find clues to personal histories in diaries, photos, music, and clothing. Illustrates how literature can be more fully understood when paired with social history artifacts that reflect the cultural norms of the time.
Online
2003
36.

Cultural Geography [electronic resource]

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Introduces the study of cultural geography, which focuses on how we shape our surrounding space, and how natural and man-made landscapes affect our perspectives. Examines literary texts through the lens of relationships of people to their environments.
Online
2003
37.

Domestic Architecture [electronic resource]

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Explains how furniture placement and interior design relay information about social attitudes and norms of behavior. Explores what these interior spaces reveal about the cultural setting and period of a literary text.
Online
2003
38.

Oral Histories [electronic resource]

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Oral histories can serve a dual role in the classroom: as a type of literature to be studied in itself and as artifacts that help explain other literary works. Focuses on how folk songs, interviews, and other oral histories provide alternative views of a text's cultural setting.
Online
2003
39.

Ceremonial Artifacts [electronic resource]

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Explores how objects used in religious ceremonies embody the spiritual beliefs of the cultures they represent. By better understanding these sacred beliefs, teachers learn to help their students connect to literary texts from unfamiliar cultural contexts.
Online
2003
40.

Introducing Arts Education [electronic resource]

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"What is Arts Education?" shows a montage of insights from teachers and administrators, plus examples of successful arts instruction in classrooms across America. "What are the Arts?" presents teachers, administrators, students, and parents who offer thoughtful and sometimes humorous comments on what the arts mean to them. In "How Do You Know They're Learning?" , educators from several schools tell how they know if their students are "getting it."
Online
2003