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Historical
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1.

History and Memory [electronic resource]

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Explores the dynamic nature of historical practice and knowledge. Topics range from the reinterpretation of Christopher Columbus'journeys, and the civilization of the ancient Mayas, to an understanding of Luba culture and reasons for demolishing the national Korean museum. Peter Winn discusses the relationships between perspective, memory, and historical "truth" revealing that historians recognize there will always be multiple, contending versions of the past.
Online
2004
2.

Maps, Time and World History [electronic resource]

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Examines the use of geographical and chronological frameworks in the study of World History. Introduces the themes of the course, fundamental questions of how people and societies through time have experienced both "accelerating integration" as well as "proliferating differences." Discusses how world historians organize their studies through temporal frameworks like periodization, chronology, and sequencing. Historian, Ross Dunn, defines "big history," an approach to world history that examines and includes past events outside of the scope of human history, including biological, climactic, geological, and cosmological developments.
Online
2004
3.

Human Migrations [electronic resource]

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Based on recent studies in archaeology and linguistics, explores how and why early humans moved across Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas. Concludes with Jerry H. Bentley's thoughts on the ever-evolving nature of our understanding of world history through the example of the Urumchi mummies of Western China.
Online
2004
4.

Social History [electronic resource]

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Introduces the discipline of social history, which focuses on the lives of ordinary people. Demonstrates how to find clues to personal histories in diaries, photos, music, and clothing. Illustrates how literature can be more fully understood when paired with social history artifacts that reflect the cultural norms of the time.
Online
2003
5.

Oral Histories [electronic resource]

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Oral histories can serve a dual role in the classroom: as a type of literature to be studied in itself and as artifacts that help explain other literary works. Focuses on how folk songs, interviews, and other oral histories provide alternative views of a text's cultural setting.
Online
2003
6.

Historical and Cultural Context [electronic resource]: Christopher Paul Curtis

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Laina Jones and her students in Dorchester, Massachusetts, explore "The Watsons Go to Birmingham 1963" by Christopher Paul Curtis. Jones uses non-fiction, documentary film, and historical photographs to contextualize the events in the novel and the Civil Rights movement. The students make deep connections to the literature through drama, poetry, and creative writing activities. Curtis visits the classroom, addresses questions, and leads students in a writing workshop. The unit culminates with a service learning project in which students create children s books about the Civil Rights movement and share them with elementary school children.
Online
2005
7.

Agricultural and Urban Revolutions [electronic resource]

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What do historians know about the earliest farmers and herders, and the evolution of cities? Newly emerging evidence about the "cradles of civilization" is examined in light of the social, technological, and cultural complexity of recently discovered settlements and cities. Archaeologist, Steve Weber, discusses the role of archaeology in the study of history, and how improvements in archaeological techniques affect our views of the past.
Online
2004
8.

Early Belief Systems [electronic resource]

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How did people begin to understand themselves in relation to the natural world and to the unseen realms beyond, and how was religion a community experience? In this unit, animism and shamanism in Shinto are contrasted with philosophical and ethical systems in early Greece and China, and the beginnings of Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, and Judaism. Candice Goucher talks about the ways in which historians evaluate prehistoric rock art to draw hypotheses about the nature of early religion.
Online
2004
9.

Order and Early Societies [electronic resource]

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Through the rise of the Chinese empire, Mayan regional kingdoms, and the complex society of Igbo Ukwu, this unit considers the origins of centralized bureaucratic empires, regional kingdoms and a decentralized way or ordering society. Linda Walton discusses the rise of gender inequality through the example of the Neolithic Hongshan culture of northeastern China, whose archeological sites contain remarkable evidence of important female imagery.
Online
2004
10.

The Spread of Religions [electronic resource]

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Shows how, as the missionaries, pilgrims, and converts of Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam moved around the world, the religions created change and were themselves changed. In conclusion, Linda Walton talks about the movement of religion via diasporas and the religious syncretism that follows.
Online
2004
11.

Early Economies [electronic resource]

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A comparison of manorial economies in Japan and medieval Europe is contrasted with the tribute economy of the Incas. The experience of dramatic economic change is illustrated by the commercial revolution in China. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the economic effects of landholding by religious institutions.
Online
2004
12.

Connections Across Land [electronic resource]

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Shows that land-based trade routes were conduits of commerce and culture. Traces the transmission of commodities, religions, diseases and people along the Eurasian Silk Roads, the trans-Saharan gold roads and the Meso-American turquoise roads. Concludes with Jerry H. Bentley's views of the destructive forces of major trade routes and their effects on the connected societies.
Online
2004
13.

Connections Across Water [electronic resource]

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Traces how the traders of the Indian Ocean, the early Mississippians, and the Norsemen carried death and disease, skills and technologies, philosophies and religion down rivers and across oceans. Concludes with Candice Goucher discussing the conflict between advances in underwater archaeology and the speculative private industry that fuels much of this expensive work.
Online
2004
14.

Early Empires [electronic resource]

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Through the Mongol empire, the Mali empire, and the Inca empire, examines the construction of empires, their administrative structures, legitimating ideologies, and the environmental and technological conditions that shaped them. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the contradictory legacies of empires through the example of the Incas in modern day Peru.
Online
2004
15.

Transmission of Traditions [electronic resource]

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Islamic Spain, Korea, and West Africa provide examples of many different modes of cultural transmission, including oral, written, artistic, and architectural styles that are adopted internationally. Concludes with Richard W. Bulliet's views of the beneficial results of historical events that prevent the transmission of traditions, as exemplified in the expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain.
Online
2004
16.

Family and Household [electronic resource]

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By examining families and households in West Asia, Europe, and China, demonstrates how the private experiences in world societies sometimes become a model for ordering the outside world. Also presents the view of women in Islam, Confucianism and Christianity. Jerry H. Bentley talks about the study of family history as a new area of historical interest and inquiry.
Online
2004
17.

Land and Labor Relationships [electronic resource]

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By studying the relationship between land availability and labor force, defines the factors that influenced how the land and its resources were exploited by pre-industrial economies. Peter Winn and Patrick Manning discuss the implications of the concurrent decline of slavery in Europe and expansion of slavery in European controlled areas of the Americas.
Online
2004
18.

Early Global Commodities [electronic resource]

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Explains that global trade was established by China's demand for silver and Spain's newly discovered mines in the America and that common currencies before that time were silver, gold, copper and shells. Candice Goucher talks about the reasons behind the continued use of regional currencies such as shells and beads even after the global spread of metals.
Online
2004
19.

Food, Demographics and Culture [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how studying the production and consumption of food allows historians to uncover hidden levels of meaning in social relationships, understand demographic shifts, and trace cultural exchange. Examines the earliest impact of globalization including changing cuisine, environmental impacts, and the rise of forced labor as a global economic force. Candice Goucher discusses the fear that consumption of exotic and genetically modified foods disrupts the order of nature.
Online
2004
20.

Ideas Shape the World [electronic resource]

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Traces the impact of European Enlightenment ideals in the American and Haitian revolutions and in South America. Also examines the revitalization of Islam expressed in the Wahhabi movement as it spread from the Arabian peninsula to Africa and Asia. Sue Peabody speaks about the history of feminist thought as a "hidden history" within the history of ideas.
Online
2004