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1.

Exploring Society: Program 19 Communications Media and Technology

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Featuring commentary from sociologists Raymond Eve, Gordon Fellman, and Mary Virnoche, this video uses real life examples to explain the positive and negative impact of communications media on society.
VHS
2002
Ivy (By Request)
2.

The True Meaning of Pictures: Shelby Lee Adams' Appalachia

The True Meaning of Pictures is a feature length documentary which addresses the issue of representation in documentary photography by examining the work of American photographer Shelby Lee Adams.. More specifically, the film seeks to (i) spend time with the subjects of Adam's work, in order to get to know them better and (ii) address the controversy and response Adams' photographs generate, which involves the politics of representation. Both strands of the film will combine to explore the larger-- and also self-reflexive-- issue of whether it is possible to "document" a community. The emotional intention is to compel viewers to move beyond voyeurism into empathy, so that by the end of the film they will feel authentically connected to people with whom they assume they have nothing i [...]
Online
2016; 2004
3.

Rich Hill

Rich Hill, Missouri (population 1,393) could be any of the countless small towns that blanket America’s heartland. But to teenagers Andrew, Harley and Appachey, it’s home. ..As they ride their skateboards, go to football practice, and arm wrestle their fathers, they are like millions of other boys coming of age. But faced with unfortunate circumstances – an imprisoned mother, isolation, instability, and parental unemployment – adolescence can be a day-to-day struggle just to survive. With no road map and all evidence to the contrary, they cling to the hope that hard work will be rewarded and even they can live the American dream.
Online
2017; 2013
4.

Santa Fiesta

There are nearly 16,000 fiestas in Spain each year featuring the brutal abuse of animals. Organized around religious observances, these festivals bring together entire towns, including children, and become celebrations of unbelievable cruelty. 60,000 animals estimated to suffer each year during these “Fiestas of Blood”.. Bulls are impaled with gasoline-soaked spikes which are set afire. Some are stabbed, tied, or thrown into the water. Pigeons, rats, pigs, geese, horses and even ants are made to suffer, while people dance, drink, laugh. The life of the people and the death of the animals is celebrated, with the silent complicity of priests, amongst prayers and mystical processions.. "Santa Fiesta" is a feature documentary about these sadistic cocktails of celebration, blood and faith [...]
Online
2018; 2016
5.

In Jackson Heights

Jackson Heights, Queens, New York City is one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse communities in the United States and the world. There are immigrants from every country in South America, Mexico, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Afghanistan, India and China. The people who live in Jackson Heights, in their cultural, racial and ethnic diversity, are representative of the new wave of immigrants to America.. The subject of this film is the daily life of the people in this community—their businesses, community centers, religions, and political, cultural and social lives—and the conflict between maintaining ties to traditions of the countries of origin and the need to learn and adapt to American ways and values.. Official Selection at the Toronto International Film Festival.. Nominated for [...]
Online
2018; 2015
6.

High School

HIGH SCHOOL was filmed at a large urban high school in Philadelphia. The film documents how the school system exists not only to pass on "facts" but also transmits social values from one generation to another. HIGH SCHOOL presents a series of formal and informal encounters between teachers, students, parents, and administrators through which the ideology and values of the school emerge.. Chosen for preservation by the National Film Preservation Board.. "HIGH SCHOOL, a wicked, brilliant documentary about life in a lower-middle-class secondary school." – Richard Schickel, Life. "HIGH SCHOOL shows no stretching of minds. It does show the overwhelming dreariness of administrators and teachers who confuse teaching with discipline. The school somehow takes warm, breathing teen-agers and tr [...]
Online
2018; 1968
7.

What Is Death? [electronic resource]

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Definitions of death have been debated for centuries, depending on culture, social conditions, and the role of the medical profession. Explores how ideas have changed historically and how our newest definitions, like "brain death," may not yet be adequate for encompassing all of death's meanings.
Online
1999
8.

The Dying Person [electronic resource]

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Three women with cancer discuss how they handle the knowledge that they are terminally ill. The role of palliative care is viewed in depth as are the changes in family relationships that occur under the pressure of the diagnosis.
Online
1999
9.

Facing Mortality [electronic resource]

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Asks the question, "How can we prepare for death?" A retired performer, an epidemiologist now suffering from AIDS, a young businesswoman, a Holocaust survivor, and a war journalist discuss how facing their own deaths and the deaths of others has affected, and transformed, their lives.
Online
1999
10.

The Deathbed [electronic resource]

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Although the scene of the deathbed drama has moved from home to hospital, the deathbed scene remains emotional for everyone involved. Those interviewed include a young man who loses his mother to cancer, a couple who lose their five-year-old daughter, and a young widow who recounts the final days of her husband's battle with leukemia.
Online
1999
11.

Fear of Death and Dying [electronic resource]

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A man diagnosed with AIDS and a woman dealing with recurrent cancer, discuss how physical pain and fear of what may happen next, affect their views of the future. An older couple explain the rational motives, and the emotional difficulties, behind their decision to prepare an "advance directive."
Online
1999
12.

Sudden Death [electronic resource]

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Explores the special issues that arise when death comes without warning. A woman widowed by the Oklahoma City bombing talks about how she handled the sudden news and loss of her husband. An ambulance paramedic discusses the reactions to imminent death among those he assists. A wife who lost her husband to suicide talks about a different kind of sudden death, where the prolonged steps that led to the end can be seen more clearly in retrospect.
Online
1999
13.

A Child's View of Death [electronic resource]

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Case studies of children, aged seven to adolecent, who understood death as a changed state of being but now begin to see how final it is. The shift to Canuck Place in Vancouver, a hospice for children who are dying or bereaved, shows the value of a support group of children's peers. The children at Canuck Place have faced their own deaths, often using metaphors and artwork to represent death.
Online
1999
14.

Grief and Bereavement [electronic resource]

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The question of, "How long does grief last?" guides conversations with two middle-aged sisters whose mother recently died, members of a family in which the youngest son was murdered, an adult orphaned as a child, and with a teenager who lost her mother and now may lose her father and brother to AIDS.
Online
1999
15.

Death Rituals [electronic resource]

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To what degree do individual circumstances require spontaneous adaptation of traditional rites? A minister who lost her brother in the Lockerbie air disaster and a father whose failing marriage affected his role in his young sons's funeral, discuss their need to adapt traditional rituals to their own circumstances. A cancer patient planning her service in advance and a veteran at a Vietnam memorial, provide a comparison of private and public rituals.
Online
1999
16.

The Good Death [electronic resource]

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Should we help people die, or force them to live? What constitutes a good death? These issues are examined from the perspective of native North American culture, urban medical ethicists, a woman facing death from breast cancer and a young family with a terminally ill infant. Ways the dying can help the living are also discussed in the context of the special grief experienced by long-term caregivers.
Online
1999
17.

Do Unto Others [electronic resource]

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A panel including Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, Faye Wattleton of Planned Parenthood, and Willard Gaylin of the Hastings Center, explore the question: How much do we as individuals owe to other members of our communities? They respond to a variety of hypothetical situations such as sounds of distress from a battered woman and child, a homeless woman living outside your apartment, and a man who is unfaithful to his wife and possibly risks exposing her to AIDS.
Online
1989
18.

To Defend a Killer [electronic resource]

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A panel of American jurists and a philosopher discuss the ethics of criminal justice. The panelists discuss whether lawyers should defend people whom they they know to be guilty and how aggressive should the defense be. They also discuss where to draw the line when it comes to citizens taking matters into their own hands, deterrence versus rehabilitation, and society's right to retribution. Includes commentary by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, defense attorney Jack Litman, and philosopher John Smith of Yale.
Online
1989
19.

Does Doctor Know Best? [electronic resource]

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A panel of medical experts discuss the ethics of doctor-patient relationships. Using the case of a young woman diagnosed as having cancer who subsequently becomes pregnant, the panelists discuss how much the patient should be told, who is in charge of selecting medical treatment, and whether doctors should allow their patients to commit suicide. Doctors from the National Cancer Institute and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center discuss controversies created by modern medicine with C. Everett Koop, journalist Ellen Goodman, and others.
Online
1989
20.

Truth on Trial [electronic resource]

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A panel of American jurists, a philosopher, and a newspaper editor discuss whether the purpose of a trial is to discover the truth, to achieve justice, or a means of carrying on a private dispute. They also consider whether the trial lawyer is responsible only to his client, or if he has a duty to the court, to the opposition, and to the public. Finally, they discuss what is owed to the public that is affected by the trial, but is not part of it. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Judge Robert Merhige, attorneys Floyd Abrams and Stanley Chesley, philosopher John Smith, and others debate civil litigation's ethical dilemmas.
Online
1989