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1.

Power, Prestige, and Wealth [electronic resource]

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Postulates how and why powerful groups or individuals have managed to control vast holdings from ancient times to the present day. Examines the different methods archaeologists use to study how rulers gain and keep power.
Online
1993
2.

Collapse [electronic resource]

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Examines the reasons behind the decline of various civilizations throughout history. Explores the collapse of the Sumerian and Mayan civlizations as well as the fall of the Roman Empire. Also discusses how overpopulation and over-exploitation of resources contributed to the collapse of Copan and looks at similar problems that confront society today.
Online
1993
3.

The Hearth [electronic resource]

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Examines how enculturation and economic cooperation have shaped the homes and families of people, past and present. Reveals remains of houses at archaeological sites and shows footage of family life in traditional cultures to provide a glimpse into what family life must have been like.
Online
1993
4.

John Maynard Keynes and Keynesianism [electronic resource]

If anyone comes close to rivaling Winston Churchill as the central figure in modern British history, it is John Maynard Keynes. He is often credited with, among other things, helping to save capitalism from the Great Depression, ensuring that the war against the Nazis was properly funded, and building postwar decades of growth and prosperity. Today his ideas remain crucial to the critical debate of our time: should governments borrow and spend their way out of a global economic crisis or slash their budgets and reduce their national debts? With contributions from some of the world's leading economic thinkers, including a Nobel laureate and the governor of the Bank of England, this program examines the Keynesian economic vision - acknowledging the ongoing controversies around it while [...]
Online
2012
5.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: The Movie - All the World's a Stage

This program paints a controversial picture of the events of September 11, 2001. It describes how the attacks on the United States have been elevated to a sacred, near-religious level - and that to challenge the orthodox view, regardless of the quality of the contrary arguments, is considered blasphemy and to be rejected.
Online
2008
6.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: Addendum - Human Nature

Focusing on human nature, this program argues that society is out of line with what science has taught us about positive human development, which promotes distortions of health and behavior that could be thwarted if the social system were to be changed.
Online
2009
7.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: Addendum - Project Earth

This program begins a thought exercise where the Earth and natural law are used as a starting point for human decision making rather than politics. The subject is explored from all sides.
Online
2009
8.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: Moving Forward - Natural Law

This program makes a prediction of what what the future may hold as society becomes more destabilized due to our outdated traditional practices.
Online
2010
9.

Deserts [electronic resource]: Global Environments

Global warming is bad news - unless, of course, you're accustomed to life in the desert. Arid environments, which already cover one third of the Earth's land mass, are growing at an alarming rate, which means that they could conceivably become the new normal. In the next few decades, up to 35 percent of the world's terrain faces desertification with the lives and livelihoods of millions, if not billions, in jeopardy. Examining the dramatic changes in store for our planet, this program looks at what the global community should be doing to prepare, what actions are currently being taken, and how cultures which have thrived for centuries in extremely dry locations are passing on a range of skills and traditions designed to help cope with the "arid" life. Can this undervalued knowledge e [...]
Online
2007
10.

Cooperation Beats Competition [electronic resource]

Survival of the fittest is a phrase coined by economist Herbert Spencer and often used to imply that competition, not consensus, is the fundamental means of survival. But an age-old spiritual concept-that placing the common good ahead of self-interest will enhance both-has been getting new attention. In this program, Hazel Henderson and ethical investing leader Terry Mollner assert that even in the financial realm, cooperation can outperform competition. Mollner uses the example of Occupy Wall Street to illustrate ways that new economic paradigms can be created, and tells the story of how he convinced Unilever to allow Ben & Jerry's to retain its social mission after being bought out.
Online
2012
11.

Being Myself [electronic resource]: Bilingualism and Identity

In this program, three bilingual and bicultural women discuss their experience with language and identity, and the ways in which culture has influenced both. Eriko, who is Japanese but educated in the U.K., finds it easier to express herself in English than in her native tongue. Kazuho is also Japanese, but moved to the U.S. as a child before returning to Japan as a teen. She shares her perceptions about language as a reflection of Asian and American societal differences. And Janet, raised in Japan and Hawaii, is the daughter of a second-generation Japanese father and a mother who was born in Japan. "I'm American when they want me to be, and Japanese when they want me to be," she says.
Online
1997
12.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Taming Capitalism Run Wild

Even as President Obama's talking points champion the middle class and condemn how our economy caters to the very rich, the truth behind modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage - as suggested by the president - faces opposition from those who apparently pledge allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Some, however, aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back. In this edition of Moyers & Company, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shed light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake and discusses how to battle for economic justice. Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan.
Online
2013
13.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Justice for Restaurant Workers

In this edition of Moyers & Company, Saru Jayaraman - who marched on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet - joins Bill to talk about how we can best support these workers' right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the cofounder and codirector of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's ten million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an insider's exposé of the restaurant industry. An essay on predatory capitalism and the One Percent concludes the program.
Online
2013
14.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: What Has Capitalism Done for Us Lately?

In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill is joined by economist Richard Wolff - author of Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism - who dives into the topic of income inequality, analyzing the widening gap between a booming stock market and a population that increasingly lives in poverty. Wolff then takes questions sent in from around the world by viewers. Also on the show is Sheila Bair, the longtime Republican who served as FDIC chair during the fiscal meltdown five years ago. Bair joins Bill to talk about American banks' continuing risky and manipulative practices, their seeming immunity from prosecution, and growing anger from Congress and the public. Bair is the author of Bull by the Horns: Fighting to Save Main Street from Wall Street and Wall Street from Itself.
Online
2013
15.

Lost Cannibals of Europe [electronic resource]

Cannibalism has long been considered a dark, if isolated occurrence in human history. Now science uncovers an ancient Germanic culture known for systematically consuming its fellow man. Witness the first of the Earth's Neolithic farmers and the burial pit they left behind, found filled with expertly butchered human remains. Archaeologists have never seen anything like it. Is it possible that cannibals are hidden in Europe's ancestral closet? An ongoing investigation into Stone Age farming communities in Germany prompts an excavation 15 miles from the border of France, where fertile topsoil conceals the remains of a culture's gruesome relationship to the human body. A history of mass graves, surgical procedure, human sacrifice, and faith, this film explores the possibility of cannibal [...]
Online
2010
16.

My Land [electronic resource]: Seeing Both Sides of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Born to a Moroccan Muslim father and a Tunisian Jewish mother, filmmaker Nabil Ayouch spent his childhood hearing divergent views about Israel and Palestine. Still wrestling with "a conflict that never left me," Ayouch created this poignant documentary about young Israelis, displaced Palestinians, and the threads of tragic history woven between two communities with deep ties to the same land. Ayouch entered Lebanese refugee camps to record personal testimonies from elderly Palestinians about memories of their birthplaces. Then he visited those homes in present-day Israel to learn about the attitudes of the young people currently living there. This process of gathering perspectives enabled Ayouch to set up the film's evocative virtual encounters, in which the Israeli subjects view and [...]
Online
2011
17.

The Hamar and Karo Tribes [electronic resource]: The Search for Mingi

Ethiopia's closely allied Hamar and Karo share many practices that help to sustain their traditional lifestyles. This program enters the world of these warrior peoples through their attentiveness toward mingi, or imperfection, and the bullah, a coming-of-age ceremony in which a young man hurdles a group of tethered bulls after a female relative, in a demonstration of respect for him, has invited other male family members to whip her. The role of the village metalworker, whose craft is prized and yet who is required to live apart from Hamar society, is also examined.
Online
2000
18.

The Mursi Tribe [electronic resource]: The Day of the Donga

Much has changed in modern Ethiopia, but at least one thing remains the same: the Mursi are still among the fiercest warriors in Africa. This program, a study of life among the Mursi, features footage of a donga, a punishing yet graceful stick fighting competition through which young men display their bravery, establish their status, and perhaps even attract a young woman to marry. Mursi mysticism and faith healing are also considered, as well as customs such as the use of large ceramic lip disks by women as symbols of beauty and wealth.
Online
2000
19.

The Social Brain [electronic resource]

By nature, humans are a social species. Our brains are wired from birth with programs that were crucial to our distant ancestors. Infants come equipped with a basic repertoire of social skills. And yet, as history has shown, there is a dark side to the human brain. The evidence is overwhelming that throughout our history as a species, relations between individuals and societies have been destructive as well as positive. As series host Roger Bingham explains: "We are living in the Space Age with brains from the Stone Age. We need to 'tune' our psychology, to figure out how to turn up the volume on ancient instincts like cooperation and turn down the volume on instincts like organized aggression.
Online
1995
20.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: Addendum - Rise

This program takes a philosophical tack in the hope of inspiring change in the viewer and promoting action that would alter society for the better.
Online
2009