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1.

Foucault Contre Lui-Même

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Presents the energy and fierce intellect of the well-known 20th century philosopher, Michel Foucault, and introduces us to some of the key elements of his work, while also acknowledging--and even celebrating--its many contradictions.
Online
2014
2.

Jewish Nationalism

In the sixth part of an eight part lecture series on “Daniel Deronda,” Professor Ruth Wisse discusses George Eliot’s inspiration for writing a novel in support of Jewish nationalism decades before Theodor Herzl wrote The Jewish State. An expert on Yiddish and Jewish literature and winner of the National Humanities Medal, Wisse draws parallels between Eliot’s relationship to her mentor, Emmanuel Deutsch, and Daniel’s relationship to Mordecai Ezra. She analyzes arguments against Mordecai’s vision from within the Jewish community, and examines Mordecai’s “embryonic Zionist” speech in Chapter 42 that also speaks to 19th century English society.
Online
2017
3.

Liberals Hold the Moral High Ground: A Debate

Do conservative or liberal philosophies lead to more just outcomes? Opposing definitions of morality have long fueled debate over America’s policy goals and national identity. For conservatives, morality is often grounded in ideals such as patriotism, including a respect for order and authority; fairness and liberty in the sense that an individual’s actions yield just rewards, or consequences; and reverence for the sanctity of religious and ethical traditions. For liberals, morality is often grounded in ideals such as compassion and caring for the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized; on fairness in the sense of redressing both historic wrongs and current inequalities of outcome; and on generosity extending beyond the bounds of nations or cultures. In today’s divisive politi [...]
Online
2018; 2017
4.

Pierre Bourdieu: Habitus, Field, and Capital

This program examines Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital. It explains that Bourdieu transformed the concept of capital to extend beyond its usual economic meaning to cover language, culture, and science.
Online
2017; 2014
5.

The Character and Education of Gwendolen Harleth

In the second of an eight part lecture series on “Daniel Deronda,” Professor Ruth Wisse examines George Eliot’s modern heroine Gwendolen Harleth. An expert on Yiddish and Jewish literature and winner of the National Humanities Medal, Wisse analyzes how Gwendolen’s upbringing contributes to her character flaws. We learn about her inappropriate education, absent father, overindulgent mother, and lack of a home base or religious guidance. Her attraction to Daniel stems from a desire for moral guidance, and she struggles with her conscience when deciding to marry Grandcourt. However, rather using Gwendolen as a precautionary tale, Eliot elicits reader sympathy and links her plight to the complex challenges facing 19th century British society.
Online
2017
6.

Bill Moyers Journal: Campaign Ads / The New Gilded Age

In the run-up to the pivotal 2008 Ohio and Texas primaries, political ads are everywhere. In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers and Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, analyze the substance and subtext of ads being used in the Obama, Clinton, and McCain campaigns. Afterward, Moyers and historian Nell Irvin Painter, author of Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919, discuss what the history and the legacy of populism reveal about the current state of inequality in America. Broadcast date: February 29, 2008. (54 minutes)
Online
2016; 2008
7.

No Gods, No Masters—Part One: The Passion for Destruction (1840-1906)

Born in France, around the Commune de Paris, and in the wake of the French Revolution, anarchism rapidly disseminated its theories throughout the world. When the brand new International Workers’ Association was created, anarchism even became predominant within the workers’ movement. Yet early on, anarchism instilled fear in people, not only because all over the world it waged the war for an 8-hour working day, founded schools with no God and no master, and promoted free love, but also, and above all, because from time to time it was quick to use violence and to destroy authority in a highly concrete way. From Ravachol to Bonnot, from the assassination of Empress Sisi of Austria to the Battle of Stepney, from bombs to raids, anarchism has become the bête noire of heads of states and r [...]
Online
2017; 2016
8.

Bill Moyers Journal: Shelby Steele on Obama / Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Why does race still matter in politics today? In this edition, Bill Moyers gets perspective from Shelby Steele, author of A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited about Obama and Why He Can’t Win and the Robert J. and Marion E. Oster Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. Also on the program, the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s Kathleen Hall Jamieson deconstructs word and image to sort spin from reality after the New Hampshire primary. Broadcast date: January 11, 2008. (57 minutes)
Online
2016; 2008
9.

How Fiction Differs From Philosophy

In the seventh part of an eight part lecture series on “Daniel Deronda,” Professor Ruth Wisse examines George Eliot’s decision to present social and political ideas in fictional form. An expert on Yiddish and Jewish literature and winner of the National Humanities Medal, Wisse focuses on the Princess Leonora Halm-Eberstein, whose lively character contrasts her rejection of Judaism and of her son Daniel. She and Gwendolen Harleth desire freedom from family constraints; Eliot uses their actions as a warning of the women’s liberation movement's potentially detrimental impacts on society—ironically, Eliot was a modern woman herself. An antithesis of Jewish motherhood, Leonora complicates the novel’s otherwise strong support of Jewish nationalism.
Online
2017
10.

No Gods, No Masters—Part Three: The Memory of the Defeated (1922-1945)

By assassinating nearly a third of Europe’s workers in some countries, World War 1 reduced the militant mass to silence. But it was above all the repressive measures of the major democracies that, from deportations to executions, dealt a blow to the anarchist movement. In this fertile inter-war period, where capitalism gave birth to its two foul beasts, Stalinism and fascism, more than ever before, anarchism continued to be the only force of resistance for the people, in the face of the totalitarian hydra that was increasingly generalizing theft and industrializing death. From Boston to Barcelona, from Tokyo to Paris, anarchism was to lead a struggle on all fronts. It was eventually in Spain, during the course of a war resembling a revolution that the movement finally came within rea [...]
Online
2017; 2016
11.

Thinking Dangerously Living Differently

Philosophy as therapy is an ancient idea. Endorsed by Wittgenstein and popularized by self-help books. But isn't philosophy about understanding even if the insights are uncomfortable? Can philosophy be a dynamic force changing how we think and what we can do? Or does it serve only as a guide to everyday life? The Panel Oxford philosopher Adrian Moore, former priest and author of Wellbeing Mark Vernon and Plato Scholar Angie Hobbs consider the purpose of philosophy.
Online
2017; 2015
12.

The Really Real

Different cultures see the world differently and cultural relativism is a widely accepted outlook. Yet faced with beheadings most of us want to assert that we know what is right and wrong. Do we need a new objectivity to combat the world's evils, or should we give up on the really real as a cultural fantasy? The Panel Philosopher and author of Truth Simon Blackburn, ResPublica director Phillip Blond and New Statesman columnist Myriam Francois-Cerrah debate truth and morality.
Online
2017; 2015
13.

Bill Moyers Journal: David Cay Johnston on Equality / Tom Paine’s Legacy

This edition of Bill Moyers Journal casts a wide net. Bill Moyers talks with David Cay Johnston, author of Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense (and Stick You with the Bill), who asserts that America’s system has been rigged to benefit the super-rich; with Harvey J. Kaye, author of Thomas Paine and the Promise of America, who has dedicated much of his life arguing for Paine’s decisive influence on the American experiment in democracy; and with Craig Unger, author of House of Bush, House of Saud and The Fall of the House of Bush, in which he lays out the political intrigues of the Bush administration and the Saudi royal family. A Bill Moyers essay on Martin Luther King, Lyndon Johnson, and their strategy to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 [...]
Online
2016; 2008
14.

Universal Responsibility in a Nuclear Age, by H. H. The Dalai Lama

This video features footage from a Global Conference of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders on Human Survival which was held in April 1988. The Dalai Lama delivers an impassioned speech at the Conference on the necessity of developing universal responsibility—what he termed "the universal religion"—in order for humankind to survive the Nuclear Age.
Online
2017; 2012
15.

The Political Vision of Daniel Deronda: Separateness With Communication

In the final part of an eight part lecture series on “Daniel Deronda,” Professor Ruth Wisse summarizes George Eliot’s great novel of nationalism. An expert on Yiddish and Jewish literature and winner of the National Humanities Medal, Wisse discusses the concept of the Jewish community remaining separate, yet communicating with other people and nations. With Mordecai’s support, Daniel embraces his calling to lead the pursuit of nationhood in Israel. However, he also maintains his English identity. In writing the novel, Eliot intended to facilitate communication to bring about Jewish sovereignty, as well as cautioning against British intolerance through assimilation, which she considered a threat to liberal democracy.
Online
2017
16.

Marx's Theory of Alienation and Species Being

This film explains the concepts of alienation and species being from Karl Marx's Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. It also considers the extent of their applicability to contemporary society.
Online
2017; 2014
17.

Durkheim's Theory Concerning Suicide

This program examines Emile Durkheim's concept of social facts. The program also considers how Durkheim analyzed fluctuating suicide rates in his work entitled Suicide.
Online
2017; 2014
18.

Forgiving Dr. Mengele

Eva Kor and her twin sister were victims of the infamous Nazi doctor, Josef Mengele, who conducted sadistic experiments on human beings at Auschwitz concentration camp. Haunted ever since by these cruel acts, something even more shocking occurs—Eva finds the power to forgive him. Having finally liberated herself from her feelings of rage and victimhood, she becomes a tireless advocate of this new way of healing, but not everyone is ready to forgive the unforgivable.
Online
2017; 2007
19.

Gandhi Vs Guevara

Gandhi's principle of non-violence made him the father of a nation. But it is Che Guevara whose face has come to represent liberty, justice, and revolution. Whose fantasies play the bigger part in shaping our reality? Does the pacifism of Gandhi or the passion of Che have the greatest power to change the world? The Panel Greenpeace director John Sauven, London Feminist Network founder Finn Mackay and author of The Lives of Others Neel Mukherjee debate the road to revolution.
Online
2017; 2015
20.

The Point of It All

We keep searching for life's meaning, but we still have no answer. The Speaker The Philosopher and the Wolf author Mark Rowlands shows us where we might look.
Online
2017; 2015