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61.

Marx's Theory of Alienation and Species Being

This film explains the concepts of alienation and species being from Karl Marx's Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. It also considers the extent of their applicability to contemporary society.
Online
2017; 2014
62.

Borderland: Episode 4

The six Americans prepare for the final leg of their journey. In Culiacan, seat of the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel, they join migrants praying to the bandit saint Jesus Malverde for safe passage. They later trek to the notorious border town of Altar where medical examiner Dr Hess informs them they will next hike the desert. Altar is where "their" migrants – Omar, Maira and Claudeth – were last seen. ‘We are walking into the valley of death,’ says one flustered American. Altar’s local priest helps the group navigate the shops that cater to passing migrants. They stock up and then start the dreaded desert border run. With the day sweltering hot and night temperatures dropping below zero, how long can they last?
Online
2017; 2014
63.

Secrets of the Tower of London—Episode 2

In this program, we meet Alice Tankerville, who attempted to “woo” her way out of trouble with a prison guard; we learn about Watt Tyler, who led the only force to storm the Tower; and how the legend grew that if you took the Tower you took the country.
Online
2018; 2015
64.

Haunted by Columbine

The killing of 12 students and a teacher at Columbine High School in 1999 dramatically framed how we view and understand school shootings today.
Online
2017; 2015
65.

I Clown for Youhoo!

Clowns today are laughter artists whose tools range from cream pie to poetic delirium. But many also lead a double life of care and tenderness. In I Clown for Youhoo! we meet Doc Willikers, Dr. Fifi, Onri Ireland, and many other loving and crazy clowns who bring laughter to children immobilized in their hospital beds, elderly persons awaiting death, refugees from whom war has taken everything, and juvenile offenders. With and without their red nose, they tell us about their work and life. They bring us into a world where lightness, darkness, laughter, and tears are often intermingled and where life, courage, and hope overcome all.
Online
2018; 2005
66.

Baby M and the Question of Surrogacy

The custody battle over Baby M was the first time a court considered surrogacy. Today's families are created in many different ways. But have we resolved the question of surrogacy?
Online
2017; 2014
67.

Resist!

It’s famed as the city of peace and love, but San Francisco is digging in for a fight over President Donald Trump’s order to expel millions of undocumented migrants.
Online
2017
68.

Should Kids’ Happiness Be the Goal of Parenting? (5/5/14)

In an era when parents are working outside the home, many struggle to figure out their proper role in their children’s lives. Competition among families and the concept of making sure kids are always happy may also be adding to the stresses of modern parenthood. Judy Woodruff talks to Jennifer Senior, author of All Joy and No Fun;The Paradox of Modern Parenthood, about the evolving pressure to raise perfectly well-rounded children.
Online
2017; 2014
69.

The Stories We Tell: Donna Brazile, Ty Burrell, Kara Walker—Finding Your Roots, Season 3

Discover the unsolved mysteries behind the family stories of political organizer Donna Brazile, actor Ty Burrell, and artist Kara Walker as they learn how the legacy of slavery has shaped their identities.
Online
2017; 2016
70.

Secrets of the Tower of London—Episode 3

This program covers the mysterious story of the Princes in the Tower; evil Judge Jeffries and how he came to regret his actions; the larger than life Colonel Blood, who succeeded in stealing the Crown Jewels, and how he got away with it; and the story of the last man to be executed there.
Online
2018; 2015
71.

Theodore Roosevelt and Women's Rights

Professor of history Gary Gerstle explains that, while Theodore Roosevelt was a staunch advocate of women's suffrage, ". . . he never thought that women could be equal to men in all respects."
Online
2015; 2011
72.

The Future: America’s Surveillance State—Part 6

In this sixth and final episode of America's Surveillance State, we look to the future. With Americans' responses still ranging from supportive to outraged, the path ahead is unclear. Politicians haveproposed regulations to constrain surveillance, and scientists are trying to build a surveillance-free internet. But spying is becoming more and more acceptable, inflitrating corporate and private life. Will the United States change its surveillance habits? The answer is unknown, even as Edward Snowden reminds us that none of these mass surveillance programs has ever stopped a terrorist attack.
Online
2015; 2014
73.

Vivo: Best Drug Is Life

An in-depth look at the community of San Patrignano, the largest drug rehabilitation and detox center in the world. This center, located near Bologna in Italy, boasts a 2,000-person capacity and has been offering its four-year therapeutic program free of cost since its inception in 1978. The center’s extraordinary success rate is a result of its unwillingness to consider addiction as an illness and its non-classical therapeutic approach that aims to eliminate dependence without drug substitution. This film follows the lives of five community residents in particular, each from different countries, as they recount their journey of struggle and hope.
Online
2018; 2011
74.

Frat Boys

America’s college fraternities are notorious for hard drinking and hard partying, but they are also accused of fostering a culture of brutality and sexual assault. During one term at the University of Central Florida, the program follows the life of a group of frat boys as they embark on the pledging process, when new recruits have to prove themselves before they can become a fraternity brother. Most are joining because fraternities provide access to a powerful network of alumni throughout the U.S. But each year, students die or are injured in barbaric initiation rituals known as hazing, and some argue that the way the fraternity system is set up allows sexual assaults to occur during drunken campus parties. Research has shown that fraternity men are three times more likely to commit [...]
Online
2017; 2016
75.

"Mother, Give Me the Sun"

British director Richard Eyre is in town to direct Ibsen’s Ghosts at BAM. With neuroscientist Heather Berlin, he learns of the neural basis for the pervading theme of attachment and desire that courses through so many of the plays, films, and characters that Sir Richard has directed. Eyre was director of the UK's National Theatre between 1987 and 1997, on the Board of Governors from November 1995- 2003, knighted in 1997, and won the Evening Standard Award for Best Director for Ibsen's Ghosts at the Almeida Theatre. Heather Berlin is a cognitive neuroscientist and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She explores interactions of the human brain and mind with the goal of contributing to improved treatment and prevention of i [...]
Online
2017; 2015
76.

Wisconsin Group Wants to Turn Student Borrowers Into Activists (6/26/14)

Through the recession, college tuition skyrocketed at public universities to make up for flagging state funding. Some students who borrowed to keep up with rising costs face crushing debt repayments. Hari Sreenivasan travelled to Wisconsin to report on one group hoping to turn the state's student borrowers into a powerful voting bloc.
Online
2017; 2014
77.

Borderland: Episode 3

In gang controlled Arriaga, Southern Mexico, the six have an emotional reunion before climbing onto a train known as "La Bestia," or "The Beast." Every day, this cargo train is used by hundreds of migrants to make their way north. As the six discover, it is a perilous way to travel north. They learn about gangs hacking migrants in half for refusing to pay bribes or ransoms, they hear about the thousands who have died falling from the train and come to appreciate that the American Dream can come at a huge cost. In Sinaloa, northern Mexico, the six join the military on a drug eradication burn, part of the Mexican government’s attempt to battle the cartels who control the now intersecting drug and migrant routes…
Online
2017; 2014
78.

Decoding Our Past

Deval Patrick is the first African American Governor of Massachusetts, and Jessica Alba is an actress who proudly embraces her Mexican American heritage. But cutting edge DNA analysis reveals that their family trees in fact contain a far more diverse range of cultures and races. Jessica Alba descends from, Jewish ancestors, Mayans and the official cartographer of France’s King Louis the 14th. Deval Patrick’s roots lead to a black homesteader in Colorado and a white master who gave his former slave land after the Civil War. We also use DNA to delve deeper into the families of other guests from the series including Valerie Jarrett, Anderson Cooper and to overcome dead ends on host Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s own tree. The secrets encoded in their genomes challenge these guests’ ideas abou [...]
Online
2015; 2014
79.

America at Risk: A History of Consumer Protest

America at Risk, hosted by journalist Ed Newman, investigates the history and influence of this country's consumer movement. The program is illustrated with archival photographs and footage as well as interviews with key people in the movement.
Online
2018; 1985
80.

War Stories: Patricia Arquette, John McCain, Julianne Moore—Finding Your Roots, Season 3

Uncover a long history of military service in the families of Patricia Arquette, Julianne Moore and John McCain, and how this has instilled in each of them an enduring spirit of strength and integrity.
Online
2017; 2016