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1.

Startalk: With Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Science, pop culture and comedy collide in National Geographic's talk show hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. Along with celebrity guests and comic co-hosts, the show explores a variety of cosmic topics and collides pop culture with science.
DVD
2015
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

The Day the Universe Changed

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This series traces the major advances in knowledge in Western civilization since the Greeks, and demonstrates how our view of the world changes as our knowledge develops.
DVD
2009; 1985
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

The Fabric of the Cosmos

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Using humor, everyday examples and computer animation for the more abstract concepts, author and physicist Brian Greene explains complex theories of the universe and the focus of his research, string theory.
DVD
2011
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Cinema Before Cinema: The Origins of Scientific Cinematography

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Argues for another history of cinema, one which had its origins in the research needs of nineteenth-century scientists. Investigators such as Étienne-Jules Marey, Georges Demeney, Jules Janssen, Albert Londe, Ottomar Anschütz, and the maverick Eadweard Muybridge were keenly interested in the analysis of motion through photography. Their technological breakthroughs led to the cinema we know today, but their true inheritors were not the producers of cinema as spectacle, but a dedicated band of scientists, doctors, anthropologists and naturalists inspired by their work who established the art of scientific cinematography.--From publisher description.
BookDVD
2005
Ivy (On Hold for a Library Patron)
5.

In Search of the Edge: Inquiry Into the Shape of the Earth and the Disappearance of Andrea Barns

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Robert Marsh hosts and narrates this film in which those few people who still believe the Earth is flat present evidence in support of that theory.
VHS
1990
Ivy (By Request)
6.

Life's Little Questions

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VHS
1999
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Scientific American Frontiers: Science Safari

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Magazine-format television series exploring the frontiers of science.
VHS
1996
Ivy (By Request)
8.

We Don't Need a Map

The Southern Cross is the most famous constellation in the southern hemisphere. Ever since colonisation it’s been claimed, appropriated and hotly-contested for ownership by a radical range of Australian groups. But for Aboriginal people the meaning of this heavenly body is deeply spiritual. And just about completely unknown. For a start, the Southern Cross isn’t even a cross - it’s a totem that’s deeply woven into the spiritual and practical lives of Aboriginal people. One of Australia’s leading film-makers, Warwick Thornton, tackles this fiery subject head-on in this bold, poetic essay-film. WE DON'T NEED A MAP asks questions about where the Southern Cross sits in the Australian psyche. Imbued with Warwick’s cavalier spirit, this is a fun and thought-provoking ride through Australia [...]
Online
2019; 2017
9.

Improvisation: What Does It Have to Do With Practicing Medicine?

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Stephen Nachmanovitch, Ph.D. (violinist, author, computer artist, and educator; owner of Free Play Productions, Charlottesville, Virginia ) began by playing an improvisational piece with Loren Ludwig (Graduate Student, McIntire School of Music, University of Virginia) who played the viola da gamba. Dr. Nachmanovitch described the similarities between medicine (physician patient interaction)/science and art and the process of creativity and improvisation which involves intense listening, openness, presence and communication. He concluded by stating that both medicine/science and art involve data gathering and experimentation which leads to the discovery of what works.
DVD
2006
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
10.

Shakers [electronic resource]

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0 The scientists-turned-gold prospectors continue their epic search for gold in the wilds of New Zealand's South Island.
Online
2005
11.

Quakers [electronic resource]

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The scientists continue to look for gold in New Zealand, following in the footsteps of the original prospectors from 1860.
Online
2005
12.
Ice

Ice [electronic resource]

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This week series host Kate Humble takes the Rough Scientists away from their epic quest for New Zealand gold, and sets them one of the show's toughest challenges yet. The team must measure the speed and melt of the Franz Josef Glacier, an awesome seven miles of ice.
Online
2005
13.

Treasure Hunt [electronic resource]

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The Rough Scientists step up their search for gold. The deadline is looming for series host Kate Humble and the five Rough Scientists, who must find and extract enough gold to make a souvenir of their stay on New Zealand's south island. As the tension mounts, Kate sets three tough challenges: to extract gold from rock and sand, to build an altimeter, and to use the altimeter to find buried gold from a treasure map.
Online
2005
14.

Big Smelt [electronic resource]

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It's D-Day for our Rough Scientists, who must build a furnace and bellows so they can try to smelt and form gold into souvenirs as a reminder of their six-week stay in New Zealand. To turn their powdered gold flakes into a solid nugget they have to achieve the white-hot temperature of 1943ʻF (1062ʻC) so the gold will melt.
Online
2005
15.

Rover [electronic resource]

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Week one's challenges are heavily focused on the "exploration" theme. Jonathan's challenge is to make a rover; a remote controlled vehicle that could explore strange new worlds. NASA come to Death Valley to test out their machines, so for Jonathan's ultimate test we subject his rover to a NASA style experiment in the desert. But unlike NASA, Jonathan has just three days and whatever he can find lying around the mine to come up with a working rover.
Online
2005
16.

Communication [electronic resource]

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No space mission can succeed without communication, so our second set of Rough Science space challenges are all based around making contact. Jonathan and Kathy have to come up with a way of communicating that doesn't use sound waves - because in the vacuum of space, there's nothing for them to move through.
Online
2005
17.

Spacesuit [electronic resource]

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Although everyone thinks of space as very cold, in fact, if you stood on the sunny side of the moon, the temperature would be hot enough to boil the blood in your body. Spacesuits are designed to protect astronauts from these extremes of temperature. The Rough Scientists have to collectively design a cooling system for their very own spacesuit. And to test it out, at the end of day three, they're going to have to go to Death Valley and do a mock moon walk in their spacesuit - hopefully staying deliciously cool.
Online
2005
18.

Impact [electronic resource]

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All about meteorites and asteroids. Not too far from the Rough Science base on the edge of Death Valley is Meteor Crater. Iain, Kathy and Mike have to work out how big the meteor that caused this huge crater must have been.
Online
2005
19.

Aerial Surveyor [electronic resource]

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The Rough Scientists had to make a Mars Rover which could explore strange new worlds. This week Kathy and Jonathan have to go one better and design an aerial surveyor that can explore much greater areas by floating above land. Just like the rover challenge, they've been given a tiny camera which will record whatever the aerial surveyor sees.
Online
2005
20.

Rocket [electronic resource]

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All about rockets. Mike, Jonathan and Kathy have to make three different rockets, but there's a catch; they're only allowed to use one thing as a fuel -- and that's water! They've also got to design their rockets to carry a "passenger" -- a (raw) egg. And Ellen and Iain have to find a way of returning the egg safely to Earth.
Online
2005