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Respiratory Organs — Diseases
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1.

Living and Breathing [electronic resource]: Coping With LAM and Other Chronic Illnesses

Faced with a life-threatening chronic ailment, it's natural for patients to grieve over lost health, lost joys, lost possibilities. But some people simply refuse to let illness define their lives. They fight back by taking a proactive approach to medical treatment, and, perhaps more importantly, by insisting that their career goals and personal lives remain top priorities. In this film, women of various backgrounds and nationalities learn to cope with lymphangioleiomyomatosis, or LAM-a rare and eventually fatal lung disease that typically afflicts female, childbearing-age patients. Trained as a social scientist, Amy Farber used her in-depth knowledge and connections in the American medical community to create a LAM-focused research organization. British author and philosophy lecturer [...]
Online
2011
2.

Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism [electronic resource]: Dangerous Blood Clots

Deep vein thrombosis is a disorder in which blood clots form in the veins of the legs. When parts of the clots break off they can travel to the lungs and cause a potentially fatal blockage called pulmonary embolism. These blood clots can occur in anyone, but hospitalized patients, people who are on long airplane flights, or those who are sedentary for an extended period of time can be at risk. In this program, viewers learn what can be done to prevent both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The video also introduces experts who are finding ways to lower the risk of developing these dangerous conditions.
Online
2012
3.

Cellphones Detecting Asthma [electronic resource]

A simple breath test could sense when an asthma attack may strike.
Online
2013
4.

Asthma [electronic resource]

With the help of this program, viewers travel to Quebec City, Canada, for the 21st World Congress of Asthma, organized by the Interasma Global Asthma Association. Key participants include Dr. Lawrence DuBuske of George Washington University Hospital; Dr. Michael Foggs of Chicago's Advocate Christ Medical Center; Dr. Gailen Marshall of the University of Mississippi Medical Center; Dr. Giorgio Walter Canonica of the University of Genoa, Italy; and the president of the congress, Dr. Louis-Philippe Boulet of Laval University, Canada. Several congress attendees introduce papers and new findings. Their topics include epidemiology, the genetics of asthma, environmental factors, mechanisms of inflammation, pathophysiology, asthma care and control, asthma in children, asthma in elderly, gende [...]
Online
2012
5.

A Breath of Hope [electronic resource]

When a loved one has a serious illness the emotional fallout can be harder for the family to bear than for the actual patient. This poignant documentary follows 27-year-old Rachel as she and her husband Brian cope with her diagnosis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare and sometimes fatal respiratory disease. After Rachel's condition unexpectedly worsens their search for a lung donor becomes all the more urgent, and Brian's devoted, anguished caretaking is now focused on keeping his wife healthy enough to remain on the organ transplant wait-list. The couple share their thoughts throughout the video, from bleak to stoic to inspirational. At the end, Rachel expressed her desire to "move on," and Brian's grief is mitigated by her radiant smile just before she passed.
Online
2009
6.

What Causes Wheezing? [electronic resource]

Wheezing can be a normal healthy response to an unhealthy environment. Or, wheezing can be a sign of asthma. I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and I want to talk with you for a moment about how to tell the difference, what causes wheezing anyway, and when is it healthy and when is it not. Well to understand that, first let's all take a deep breath together. When you breathe in, the air comes through your nose or mouth, through the big windpipe and branches into two big bronchi, one into each lung. And from there it branches into a whole bunch of little, smaller bronchioles. It's almost like a tree's branches branching out. And those bronchioles are where the wheezing happens. Let's look at a bronchiole. Here's one of those small airways. Now if you happen to walk into a cloud of something that's [...]
Online
2011
7.

Free to Breathe, Free to Live [electronic resource]

For millions of people with respiratory illnesses, every breath is a struggle for life. Free to Breathe, Free to Live is a reality-style documentary that allows viewers to step inside the lives of patients who are grappling with respiratory diseases-and winning. Children attending specialized camps for youths with asthma are spotlighted, as are a number of adults battling a variety of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
Online
2005; 2003
8.

Mesothelioma [electronic resource]: Hidden Threat

Prolonged exposure to asbestos-or, in some cases, even moderate contact-can lead to a devastating cancer called mesothelioma. This program examines the specific causes of the disease while presenting case studies involving a variety of patient experiences. Viewers learn how mesothelioma occurs when malignant cells form in the protective sac, or mesothelium, covering many internal organs. Dr. Harvey Paas of the NYU Langone Medical Center and Dr. John Costanzi of Lone Star Oncology Consultants explain diagnosis methods and newly developed treatments, while male and female patients describe the hazards that may have caused their cancers and what they are doing to survive and thrive.
Online
2009; 2008
9.

COPD [electronic resource]: Struggle to Breathe

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an umbrella term used to describe patients with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, or any combination among those three ailments. This program examines the impairments of COPD, including shortness of breath and mobility so restricted that simple tasks like walking to the car are almost impossible. Several case studies reveal both the clinical and the human dimensions of COPD, while newly developed drug treatments for the disease are also highlighted. Expert commentary comes from John Kirkwood, President and CEO of the American Lung Association; Dr. Frank Rahaghi of the Cleveland Clinic Florida; and Dr. Gene Colice of Washington Hospital Center.
Online
2007; 2006
10.

Pulmonary Fibrosis [electronic resource]

Lung disease-or pulmonary fibrosis, to use a more clinical term-is actually a set of illnesses that cause progressive scarring inside the lungs. This program takes a close look at the disease, the ways in which it is often detected, and current strategies for treating it. Showing how, over time, pulmonary fibrosis replaces healthy lung tissue with scar tissue, the program demonstrates how this causes airways to constrict, making oxygenation difficult and eventually impossible. Doctors, researchers, and patients are interviewed, presenting several case studies. Viewers will discover how clinical trials may one day lead to a drug that prevents lung function from worsening-allowing patients to live longer.
Online
2007; 2006
11.

Preventing Flu and Pneumonia [electronic resource]

According to the American Lung Association, flu and pneumonia are jointly ranked as the seventh leading cause of death in the United States-hence, the critical importance of flu and pneumococcus vaccines in preparation for winter. This program outlines the science behind influenza and pneumonia and the conditions, both hygienic and environmental, that contribute to the spread of dangerous viruses and bacteria. Engaging animation sequences, compelling case studies, and interviews with prominent physicians create a framework for improving viewer comprehension of flu and pneumonia. Detailed physician recommendations highlight the best ways to prevent these illnesses.
Online
2007; 2006
12.

Sleep Apnea [electronic resource]

Over 19 million Americans have obstructive sleep apnea. But the potentially fatal disorder only presents during sleep-so a large number of sufferers remain unaware of the danger. This program explores the causes of OSA and the treatments available for it. Two instructive case studies will help viewers understand and feel comfortable about current diagnostic approaches, including the completion of a polysomnogram or sleep study. With the expertise of Dr. Stephen Scharf, director of the University of Maryland Sleep Disorder Clinic, and Dr. Rosanne Barker of the Barker Sleep Institute, the program illustrates many of the treatments that have turned the "slow death" of sleep apnea into a new lease on life.
Online
2009; 2007
13.

Indoor Air Quality [electronic resource]

According to some environmental experts, the air inside our homes and offices could be more polluted than the outdoor air in the largest cities. Radon, mold, household cleaning products, and secondhand smoke are only a few elements that may pose health risks. This program examines the issue in detail and illustrates ways to improve indoor air quality. Case studies include a nonsmoker diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer whose basement was found to contain high levels of radon, and a woman whose exposure to household mold almost ended her life. In addition to commentary from Dallas Jones, Chairman of the American Radon Policy Coalition, the program also features two indoor air quality experts, Mark McGowan and Jeffrey Ayers.
Online
2009; 2007
14.

Drug-Resistant Pneumonia [electronic resource]

When antibiotics first came on the scene, deaths from pneumonia plunged. But the microbes that cause the lung infection are resilient and continue to evolve, creating new strains that don't respond to conventional drugs. This program tours a high-tech medical lab where super-bacteria are identified, illuminates ongoing research into fighting drug-resistant MRSA, and explains why serious pneumonia cases can put doctors in a race against time. Expert guests include Dr. Marin Kollef of Washington University's School of Medicine, Dr. John Gill Bartlett of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Dr. Michael S. Niederman of Winthrop University Hospital.
Online
2009; 2007
15.

Alpha-1 Genetic Deficiency [electronic resource]

Left untreated, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can seriously, even fatally, damage the liver and lungs. This program enables viewers to understand the incurable disorder and how it can be identified and treated. Computer-generated animation shows how AAT, a protein that facilitates lung function, can back up in the liver and never reach the lungs. Three case studies, including one featuring a lung transplant patient, help to explain AATD's causes, symptoms, and lifestyle impact while outlining protein augmentation therapy and oxygen supplementation. Dr. Kyle Hogarth of the University of Chicago Medical Center and John Walsh, founder of the Alpha 1 Foundation, are featured in interviews.
Online
2009; 2008
16.

Asbestos [electronic resource]: Magic Mineral, Killer Dust

For nearly a hundred years, asbestos fibers were woven into the very fabric of commercial and residential life in North America and Europe-despite an industry awareness that asbestos dust is extremely dangerous. This program featuring Geoffrey Tweedale, author of Magic Mineral to Killer Dust, and environmental consultant Barry Castleman illuminates the dark history of flame-retardant asbestos: asbestosis fatalities, efforts by the asbestos industry to deflect criticism of its products, the scientific correlation of mesothelioma to asbestos exposure, and belated governmental regulation. Also, today's growing market for asbestos in developing countries is exposed.
Online
2005
17.

Lungs [electronic resource]

In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts uses shock tactics to make one confirmed smoker realize how much she's damaging her lungs. On a night in the pub, Lisa can easily binge smoke her way through 40 cigarettes. She gets out of breath quickly and knows that quitting cigarettes will give her more endurance. She meets Dr. Roberts in the laboratory, where they dissect a set of pig's lungs (very similar to human lungs) to discover just how they work. They also watch an operation carried out on a 56-year-old smoker, who has a cancerous tumor on her lungs. Lisa realizes this is exactly what she could be facing if she doesn't give up her habit.
Online
2007
18.

Allergy to Mold, Animal Dander, Dust [electronic resource]

Allergy-related symptoms can occur after you are around mold, certain animals or animal hair, dust, and other substances. These substances are usually found indoors and do not cause symptoms for most people.
Online
2011
19.

Allergic Rhinitis [electronic resource]

Allergic rhinitis is a group of symptoms affecting the nose. These symptoms occur when you breathe in something you are allergic to. When a person with allergic rhinitis breathes in an allergen such as pollen or dust, the body releases chemicals, including histamine. This causes allergy symptoms. Hay fever involves an allergic reaction to pollen. A similar reaction occurs with allergy to mold, animal dander, dust, and other allergens that you breathe in.
Online
2011
20.

Asthma [electronic resource]: Children

Asthma is caused by inflammation in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the muscles surrounding the airways become tight and the lining of the air passages swells. This reduces the amount of air that can pass by. In sensitive people, asthma symptoms can be triggered by breathing in allergy-causing substances (called allergens or triggers).
Online
2011