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Respiratory Organs — Diseases
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1.

Food Sensitivities [electronic resource]: Allergy and Intolerance

Food allergies or intolerance can mean anything from minor discomfort or inconvenience to a life-threatening situation. This informative program explains the difference between food allergy and food intolerance and examines the eight most common food allergens. Symptoms of food allergy or intolerance are given, as well as ways they can be relieved. The video also covers the creation of a response plan in case of a severe allergic reaction.
Online
2006; 2000
2.

Free to Breathe, Free to Live [electronic resource]

For millions of people with respiratory illnesses, every breath is a struggle for life. Free to Breathe, Free to Live is a reality-style documentary that allows viewers to step inside the lives of patients who are grappling with respiratory diseases-and winning. Children attending specialized camps for youths with asthma are spotlighted, as are a number of adults battling a variety of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
Online
2005; 2003
3.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome [electronic resource]

Several thousand seemingly healthy babies die in their sleep each year. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is one of the leading causes of death in infants. This program explores what is known about SIDS and examines some practices that may reduce risk factors. Physicians and other health experts discuss appropriate prenatal care and examine child sleeping positions, parental smoking, and other factors. Although significant advances have been made in the treatment of many serious illnesses, doctors and scientists remain baffled by SIDS and stress that there can be no blame if a baby succumbs to this silent killer. An excellent program for future parents, child care providers, and anyone else who has responsibility for infants.
Online
2006; 1998
4.

One Breath [electronic resource]: A Personal Journey With Asthma

What happens when asthma goes undetected until adulthood? This program features four individuals (including the film's director) who have suffered from the condition for decades but have only recently realized that it is the source of their health problems. Each describes for the camera how they are coming to terms with asthma's impact on their lives - from the constant battle for breath and energy to emotional journeys through denial, fear, anger, and acceptance. In addition, medical professionals who specialize in diagnosing and treating asthma help to explain its physiology, its signs and symptoms, the roles played by allergens and temperature extremes, and the uses of peak flow monitoring, spirometry, bronchodilators, and other innovations. Eye-catching 3-D animation illustrates [...]
Online
2010
5.

A Breath of Hope [electronic resource]

When a loved one has a serious illness the emotional fallout can be harder for the family to bear than for the actual patient. This poignant documentary follows 27-year-old Rachel as she and her husband Brian cope with her diagnosis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare and sometimes fatal respiratory disease. After Rachel's condition unexpectedly worsens their search for a lung donor becomes all the more urgent, and Brian's devoted, anguished caretaking is now focused on keeping his wife healthy enough to remain on the organ transplant wait-list. The couple share their thoughts throughout the video, from bleak to stoic to inspirational. At the end, Rachel expressed her desire to "move on," and Brian's grief is mitigated by her radiant smile just before she passed.
Online
2009
6.

What Causes Wheezing? [electronic resource]

Wheezing can be a normal healthy response to an unhealthy environment. Or, wheezing can be a sign of asthma. I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and I want to talk with you for a moment about how to tell the difference, what causes wheezing anyway, and when is it healthy and when is it not. Well to understand that, first let's all take a deep breath together. When you breathe in, the air comes through your nose or mouth, through the big windpipe and branches into two big bronchi, one into each lung. And from there it branches into a whole bunch of little, smaller bronchioles. It's almost like a tree's branches branching out. And those bronchioles are where the wheezing happens. Let's look at a bronchiole. Here's one of those small airways. Now if you happen to walk into a cloud of something that's [...]
Online
2011
7.

Allergic Rhinitis [electronic resource]

Allergic rhinitis is a group of symptoms affecting the nose. These symptoms occur when you breathe in something you are allergic to. When a person with allergic rhinitis breathes in an allergen such as pollen or dust, the body releases chemicals, including histamine. This causes allergy symptoms. Hay fever involves an allergic reaction to pollen. A similar reaction occurs with allergy to mold, animal dander, dust, and other allergens that you breathe in.
Online
2011
8.

Allergy to Mold, Animal Dander, Dust [electronic resource]

Allergy-related symptoms can occur after you are around mold, certain animals or animal hair, dust, and other substances. These substances are usually found indoors and do not cause symptoms for most people.
Online
2011
9.

Asthma [electronic resource]: Children

Asthma is caused by inflammation in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the muscles surrounding the airways become tight and the lining of the air passages swells. This reduces the amount of air that can pass by. In sensitive people, asthma symptoms can be triggered by breathing in allergy-causing substances (called allergens or triggers).
Online
2011
10.

Bronchitis [electronic resource]

Bronchitis is a condition in which the bronchial tubes become inflamed. These tubes carry air to your lungs. People who have bronchitis often have a cough that brings up mucus. Bronchitis also may cause wheezing (a whistling or squeaky sound when you breathe), chest pain or discomfort, a low fever, and shortness of breath.
Online
2011
11.

COPD Inhaler [electronic resource]

Inhalers of one kind or another are often the mainstay of asthma therapy. I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and let's talk about how to actually use an inhaler.
Online
2011
12.

Cystic Fibrosis [electronic resource]: Nutritional Considerations

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a potentially life-threatening disease that causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs and digestive tract. Persons with cystic fibrosis need to eat high calorie and high protein foods throughout the day.
Online
2011
13.

Cystic Fibrosis [electronic resource]

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems and making it easy for bacteria to grow. This can lead to problems such as repeated lung infections and lung damage.
Online
2011
14.

Pneumonia [electronic resource]

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lung, usually caused by an infection. Three common causes are bacteria, viruses and fungi. You can also get pneumonia by accidentally inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems.
Online
2011
15.

Sinusitis [electronic resource]

Sinusitis is inflammation of the sinuses that occurs with an infection from a virus, bacteria, or fungus.
Online
2011
16.

What in the World Is a Neti Pot? [electronic resource]

What in the world is a neti pot? I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and I want to show you this simple device that has been used in a natural way to help deal with nasal congestion, sinus congestion, and allergies.
Online
2011
17.

Snoring [electronic resource]

During sleep, your airways can become partially blocked, forcing your lungs to inhale harder to compensate for the lack of air entering your body. The vibrating soft palate and uvula cause snoring. Other factors that can cause snoring are poor muscle tone, excessive use of alcohol, heavy smoking, colds, allergies, and obesity.
Online
2010
18.

Coughing [electronic resource]

You cough at a speed of 100 miles per hour when clearing your breathing passages of unwanted irritants. First, your vocal cords open widely, allowing a large amount of air to be sucked into your lungs. Your epiglottis closes off your trachea, and your diaphragm and rib muscles contract. With the increased pressure behind it, the air is forcefully expelled, creating a rushing sound as it moves quickly past your vocal cords. The air dislodges the irritant, making it possible for you to breathe comfortably again.
Online
2010
19.

Allergies [electronic resource]

When pollen is released into the air and enters the nasal tissues, our nonspecific immune defense system is alerted. The pollen allergens encounter the plasma cells in the nose, which respond by producing antibodies that attach to mast cells. These white blood cells contain the chemical histamine. As antibodies are produced, the mast cells release histamine. The results are a runny nose, sneezing, and watery eyes, all of which help remove the invading pollen. The effects of histamine can be so uncomfortable that people take antihistamine medication to make their allergies less severe.
Online
2010
20.

Effects of Smoking [electronic resource]

Normal lungs are a healthy pink color; when they filter smoke they turn black, and the resulting tissue damage can lead to tumors and other serious lung disease. Smoking also affects the cardiovascular system, possibly leading to atherosclerosis, heart attacks, and strokes. If you don't smoke, don't start. If you do smoke, it's never too late to quit.
Online
2010