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1.

Le Collier Perdu de la Colombe

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The story revolves around Hassan, who is studying Arabic calligraphy from a grand master. Coming across a fragment of manuscript, Hassan goes in search of the missing pieces, believing that once he finds them, he will learn the secrets of love. With the help of Zin, a lovers' go-between, he meets the beautiful Aziz, Princess of Samarkand. After encountering wars, a battle between false prophets and an ancient curse, he learns that an entire lifetime would not suffice for him to learn the many dimensions of love.; A story set in the ancient deserts and settlements of Tunisia. While studying Arabic calligraphy from a grand master, Hassan comes across a fragment of rare manuscript. He sets off in search of the missing pieces, believing that once he finds them, they will reveal all the s [...]
DVD
2008; 1991
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Das Schreckliche Mädchen: The Nasty Girl

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Sonja undertakes a school project for an essay writing contest on the subject of her town's history during the Third Reich. She begins to search for facts, but those people who have personal experience of that time are unwilling to provide her with information.
DVD
2011; 1991
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

On the Nature and Conduct of Technical Research

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Dr. O'Connell defines research, talks about the history of research, and points out the importance of experiment and data treatment, selecting the best hypothesis, and the ethics of research.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
5.

School Writing/Real World [electronic resource]

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Previews the series, introducing key topics and showing how the classroom is a natural link to writing in the career world. Interviews people in different fields, from police work to music, who utilize writing consistently in their work. Discusses the fact that good jobs require writing skills, research skills are not limited to school work, and one should think critically beyond textbooks.
Online
2000
6.

Research [electronic resource]

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Examines the role of research in selecting a topic, narrowing a topic to a thesis statement, developing the thesis, and evaluating the different supporting information.
Online
2000
7.

DNA as Icon: The Gene in Public Discourse

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Dorothy Nelkin, Ph. D. (University Professor, New York University, New York, New York) spoke on the use of metaphor in science and particularly in the field of genetics research. Dr. Nelkin discussed four themes: essentialist, religious, fatalistic, and commodity that have been used as metaphors. She also discussed the misleading and flawed aspects of using metaphors and how metaphors have been used in general. Carl O. Trindle, Ph. D. (Professor of Chemistry and Principal of Brown College, University of Virginia) discussed the "picture as worth a thousand words" and "How we imagine the Genome."
DVD
2001
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
8.

Hideous Progeny: Frankenstein Revisited

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Susan E. Lederer, Ph. D. (Assistant Professor, Section of History of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine) uses slides and a video clip to present the iconographic elements of the Frankenstein myth (i.e. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus, 1818) as it is embodied in our culture via cartoons and captions. Dr. Lederer discusses the dialectic between scientific creation and personal responsibility. Current genetic engineering, recombinant DNA research, and xenotransplantation are examples of modern day "Frankenstein" applications. James Hunter Groninger (Magistère, Université de Paris - Sorbonne and Class of 2002, University of Virginia School of Medicine) discusses the issues of "science gone wrong", "personal conscience or soul", and a medical student's re [...]
DVD
1999
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
9.

Training the Academic Clinical Investigator

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The panel discusses the importance of the academic clinical investigator as a critical link to basic biological discoveries and the application of new knowledge to problems of patients. They address the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to training for this academic research position.
DVD
1992
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
10.

Academe and Government, Firm Link or Broken Reed?

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Dr. Petersdorf, president of the Association of American Medical Colleges discusses several topics: medical research, education and teaching, patient care, physicians' fees, and the U. S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs.
DVD
1993
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
11.

Doing Better and Feeling Worse: New Roles and Responsibilities for Researchers, Clinicians, and Patients

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William A. Knaus, M.D. (Evelyn Troup Hobson Professor and Chair, Department of Health Evaluation Sciences, University of Virginia) presented a thought provoking model for future interactive roles between researchers, clinicians, and patients which forecasts researchers/clinicians and patients co-authoring research articles. He also postulated that the various new electronic tools may help lessen the impact of information overload and increase communication across various disciplines. Erik L. Hewlett, M.D., (Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology and Associate Dean for Research, University of Virginia) spoke on the new Clinical Trials Office which is located in Health Evaluation Sciences at the University of Virginia.
DVD
1997
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
12.

Improving Pain Management: An Ongoing Journey

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Christine Miaskowski, R.N., Ph. D., F.A.A.N. (Professor and Chair, Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco) shares her personal educational and research journey. The foci of her research has been the side effects of under treated pain (particularly among vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, substance abusers, and women), sleep patterns of cancer pain patients and their caregivers, and her quest for the "ideal" analgesic which will provide "more effective pain relief, no side effects, and be inexpensive."
DVD
2000
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
13.

Disentangling Alzheimer's: New Research

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H. Robert Brashear, M.D. (Associate Professor, Departments of Neurology and Psychiatric Medicine, University of Virginia) introduced the topic of Alzheimer's and was the last speaker summarizing various pharmacological trials and treatments. Russell H. Swerdlow, M.D. (Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, University of Virginia) discussed the basic science surrounding Alzheimer's and Carol A. Manning, Ph. D. (Associate Professor, Department of Clinial Neurology, University of Virginia) discussed the current clinical research taking place in Alzheimer's research. Topics such as neurodegeneration, protein aggregation, apoptosis, amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and mitochondrial dysfunction were discussed.
DVD
2000
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
14.

AIDS in the 90's: What the Future Holds

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Dr. Gottlieb, co-founder of AMFAR (American Foundation for AIDS Research) discusses the "complex problem in human biology, a tale of two species : HIV and humans." The goal of his presentation was to "light a fire under" some of the audience members to work on AIDS.; Dr. Gottlieb notes: "In 1981 I reported the first five cases of AIDS to the Centers for Disease Control. In retrospect HIV had begun its slow burn through the human species in the late seventies. By conservative estimates forty million will be infected with HIV worldwide by the year 2000 with equal numbers of men and women. What factors account for our failure to come to grips with this modern day plague? Why do we fail to take AIDS seriously? As we approach the mid-point of the 90's, where do we stand and what does the [...]
DVD
1994
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
15.

Building Life: The Promise and Challenges of Synthetic Biology

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Jason Papin, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia) provided a background on synthetic biology as it intersects with the fundamentals of biology, technological processes utilizing tools and techniques such as DNA sequencing, fabrication, modeling, and mathematical computation. Dr. Papin illustrated the applications of synthetic biology with research involving insulin, antimalarial compounds, and the development of animal and plant breeds that are resistant to disease. Michael Rodemeyer, J.D. (Lecturer in Science, Technology and Society, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia) discussed the ethical implications of "playing God," and concerns of biosecurity and biosafety within greater uncertainty and complexity.
DVDOnline
2011
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
16.

Who Owns Human Tissues and Cells Used in Research?

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The panel examines some of the legal, ethical and economic issues stemming from the use of human biological materials for therapy, research and profit. These issues include: consideration of human cells and tissues as "property" which the"owner" may abandon, donate or sell; society's right to restrict modes of transfer of these materials; and what institutions and researchers should disclose to those who are the potential sources of biological materials.
DVD
1988
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
17.

Public Bioethics: The Case of Stem-Cell Research

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Harold T. Shapiro, Ph. D. (President Emeritus and Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University Chair, National Bioethics Advisory Commission, 1996-2001) spoke on the need for open group discussions on stem-cell research and the impact of public policy and moral pluralism. Adam J. Katz, M.D. (Assistant Professor, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Virginia) discussed the use of adult stem cells and the example of fat tissue as a plentiful source. James F. Childress, Ph. D. (Edwin B. Kyle Professor of Religious Studies, Professor of Medical Education, and Director, Institute for Practical Ethics, University of Virginia) continued the discussion of the United States' pluralistic society and the positions of religious groups regarding stem-c [...]
DVD
2001
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
18.

Forbidden Knowledge

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Roger Shattuck (University of Professor emeritus, Department of Modern Foreign Languages, Boston University and author of the book "Forbidden Knowledge") explores the notions surrounding knowledge, science, research, and ethics. He poses the questions: Should knowledge have no limits? and Should there be/must there be limits to knowledge and its applications? John C. Herr (Ph. D., Professor of Cell Biology and Director of the Center for Recombinant Gamete Contraceptive Vaccinogens, University of Virginia) presents the case that there are experiments that must be prohibited.
DVD
1997
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
19.

Unethical Research in Developing Countries

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Sidney Wolfe, M.D. (Health Research Group, Washington, D.C.) discusses the controversy regarding placebo trials and antiretroviral drug testing in developing countries. Dr. Wolfe cites the common justifications given for witholding antiretroviral drug protocols for HIV positive pregnant women in third world countries. Dr. Wolfe ends by saying that physicians need to be aware that they are always investigators and need to do what is the best for patients and not deny access to regimens based on certain held justifications. John Arras, Ph.D. (Porterfield Professor of ethics and Professor of philosophy) presents a challenging view which says that there are some circumstances in which placebo trials can be morally justifiable.
DVD
1998
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
20.

Human Stem Cell Research: Medical Promise and Moral Controversy

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Sonia H. Pearson-White, Ph. D. (Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Genetics, Director, Transgenic Mouse Core Facility, University of Virginia) outlined the origins of mouse embryonic stem cells and introduced the controversy using these cells for reproductive and therapeutic cloning. John C. Fletcher, Ph. D. (Co-Director, Programs of Education and Training in Healthcare Ethics, University of Virginia) discussed the moral aspects of fetal tissue research, donated embryos, cloned embryos, and the recruitment of gametes for private and/or federal research. James F. Childress, Ph. D. (Kyle Professor of Religious Studies and Professor of Medical Education, Member of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission) summarized with the needs for formulating the eth [...]
DVD
1999
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)