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41.

Shaker Town [electronic resource]: A More Perfect Order

Centered on faith, hard work, and the early stirrings of racial and sexual equality, the Shaker lifestyle was in many ways ahead of its time. But what was daily life like inside Shaker communities? Several years in the making, this program uses extensive archival footage integrated with reenactments and scholarly interviews to illustrate the Shakers' ordered, highly idealistic society. Visits to historic establishments in Pleasant Hill and South Union, Kentucky, shed light on distinctive Shaker crafts and architecture (churches, barns, houses, and furniture) as well as complex cultural and economic issues (financial management, dissolution of the traditional family structure, and more) that shaped the United Society of Believers.
Online
2008
42.

Light and Mourning [electronic resource]

Has the Catholic Church become a ghost ship in search of a crew? Director Nicola Zavaglia reflects on this consequential issue with a documentary that brings you behind the closed doors of Catholicism. Featuring interviews with members of the Quebec and French clergy, as well as striking images shot in Rome and Calabria, Light and Mourning goes back to the roots of Christian belief in an attempt to explain the dramatic decline of the once powerful church in modern society. Two thousand years after Jesus, can the Catholic religion hope to flourish once again?
Online
1999
43.

Believing [electronic resource]: Pilgrimage to Santiago

Goethe once said, "Europe was made on the pilgrim road to Compostela." Stretching from France to the Spanish town of Santiago de Compostela, where the cathedral is said to house the remains of James the Apostle, El Camino - or the Way of St. James - was the first great pilgrims' route. Millions made the long journey in an age when people rarely ventured beyond their village or town. Filmmaker Lina Moreco retraces their steps with her "pilgrim camera." She follows El Camino through the rolling landscape and ancient hill-towns of Galicia in a quest to understand the notion of faith in the closing days of the 20th century. Using the pilgrimage as a metaphor, this classic film explores the phenomenon of faith - in God and religion as well as in oneself. What are the wellsprings of faith? [...]
Online
1999
44.

The Word and the Sword [electronic resource]

In this episode, Andrew Marr plunges into the spiritual revolutions that shook the world between 300 BC and 700 AD. This was an age that saw the bloody prince Ashoka turn to Buddhism in India; the ill-fated union of Julius Caesar and Egypt's Cleopatra; the unstoppable rise of Christianity across the Roman Empire and the dramatic spread of Islam from Spain to Central Asia. The most potent human force on the planet came from combining faith and military power; both Christianity and Islam created new empires of 'the word and the sword'.
Online
2012
45.

The Circles of Light [electronic resource]: Divine Comedy

The most celebrated work of Dante Alighieri is certainly the Divina Commedia-a vision of hell, purgatory, and heaven that provides a strangely surrealistic view of medieval attitudes on religious dogma and the price of disobedience. In this program, dramatizations of scenes depicting courtly love, sexual love, love of God, and love of the Virgin Mary are featured.
Online
2009; 1995
46.

The City of God [electronic resource]

Augustine of Hippo is a symbol of humankind in early medieval times, seeking to understand the terror and destruction resulting from the barbarian devastations of the Roman world, seeking to find the hand of God-and finding it in the counterpart to the destroyed city of man in the city of God. The program covers the church resurgence, filling the vacuum left by the collapse of civil government and changing to meet its new obligations and fill its new role in society; the creation of the Vulgate Bible; mass conversions; the rule of Pope Gregory the Great-the last of the Roman popes and the first of the European; monastic life; Romanesque architecture; and the role of the pilgrimage in medieval society.
Online
2008; 1989
47.

The Dark Ages and the Millennium [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 9th and 10th Centuries

Part one of this program probes the nature of Christian prayer, questioning Eastern reliance on icons rather than the Word, as in the West. Were the incessant attacks on Constantinople by Islamic and Bulgar forces a divine judgment for idolatrous behavior? Part two chronicles the chaos in Europe that broke out with the death of Charlemagne and the approach of the millennium. The ensuing political instability, combined with the questionable Cadaver Synod and fears of the Apocalypse, stood in stark contrast to the efforts of the Peace of God movement and the Abbey of Cluny to maintain order.
Online
2007; 1999
48.

The Jeweled City [electronic resource]: Cathedral of Chartres

The Cathedral of Chartres, built from 1150 to 1220 and widely recognized as a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, is now a world heritage site. This program offers a narrated tour of the cathedral, along with a historical portrait of the political and religious fervor of the medieval architects who saw it through to completion.
Online
2005; 1995
49.

The Language of the Soul [electronic resource]: Abraham's Children

Apart from their outward differences in ritual and doctrine, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam share an inward-pointing imperative to know God. In this program, clergy, theologians, and others with religious vocations delve into the esoteric aspects of three of the world's great religions. The use of meditation and contemplation as vehicles for transcending the mundane and drawing closer to the divine is examined, especially as exemplified by monastic life, Kabbalism, and Sufism.
Online
2006; 1999
50.

The Mystical Spirit of the East [electronic resource]: Masters and Disciples

Filmed on location in India, Japan, and elsewhere, this program provides insights into Hinduism; Mahayana, Hinayana, Tantric, and Zen Buddhism; and Shintoism. Religious leaders including 112-year-old Sri Swami Shivananda, deputy director of the Divine Life Society; Master Thich Nhat Hanh, founder of the Plum Village Zen community; His Holiness the Dalai Lama; and The Venerable Mr. Hatakake, head abbot of the Ise Shinto shrine, elaborate on the principles of their timeless religions.
Online
2006; 1999
51.

The One and the Many [electronic resource]: Pilgrims in a World of Faith

Whether for pardon, healing, inspiration, or enlightenment, a pilgrimage can be a journey through the kingdom of spirit. In this program, Paul Coelho, author of The Pilgrimage; His Holiness the Dalai Lama; the director of the Tiberias Center for Kabbalah and Healing; and others reflect on the history and significance of major pilgrimage destinations, including Santiago de Compostela, Mecca, Bodh Gaya, the Jordan and Ganges Rivers, the tombs of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai and Kobo Daishi, and Chamundi Hill.
Online
2006; 1999
52.

The Roots of Belief [electronic resource]: Animism to Abraham, Moses, and Buddha

Neanderthals begin burying their dead in sepulchers that simulate their huts in an attempt to connect with the spiritual world. When God first speaks to Abraham, he becomes the father of three great religions: Judaism, and subsequently Christianity and Islam. Moses leads the children of Israel out of slavery and into the Promised Land. Buddha, "The Awakened One," teaches humans to transcend their worldly desires. This program traces these stories, and their inevitable path toward the institutionalization of religious practice.
Online
2006; 1998
53.

The Truth Within [electronic resource]: Towards a New Spiritual Utopia

Why are many of today's spiritual seekers looking beyond the world's mainstream religions for fulfillment? And is technology eclipsing the concept of God? This program goes to the heart of those questions through interviews with Marilyn Ferguson, author of The Aquarian Conspiracy, as well as leaders of New Age organizations such as the Naropa Institute, the Krishnamurti Foundation, and the University of Creation Spirituality. In addition, Dr. Huston Smith, Father Laurence Freeman, Master Thich Nhat Hanh, and Sheikh Abd al-Wahid Pallavicini offer their opinions on the New Age movement.
Online
2006; 1999
54.

Three Pillars [electronic resource]: Confucius, Jesus, and Mohammed

The identities of the founders of three major religions-Confucianism, Christianity, and Islam-are studied in this program. The story of Confucianism and how its tenets spread to the Chinese social and political structure includes discussions about the yin (feminine principle) and the yang (masculine principle) The significance of Jesus as a prophet for Muslims, and God incarnate for Christians, is analyzed. Mohammed and the religion he created as codified in the Koran are examined. Temples, churches, and mosques are discussed as intrinsic to the practice of each religion.
Online
2006; 1998
55.

Trials and Triumphs in Rome [electronic resource]: Christianity in the 3rd and 4th Centuries

Part one of this program places Christianity-an outlawed faith-within the context of the religiously diverse Roman Empire, whose citizens worshipped the old Greco-Roman gods, mystery cult figures such as Mithra, and the Emperor himself. But by appealing to all people and promising eternal salvation, Christianity began to surpass the popularity of the Roman religions. Part two begins with Diocletian's Great Persecution; proceeds to Constantine's conversion, the Edict of Milan, and the Council of Nicaea; and closes with the excommunication of Theodosius.
Online
2007; 1999
56.

Animals as Divinities [electronic resource]

Prehistoric art often renders animals in spiritual, even divine, form-but primitive beast images can also reflect a degree of humanity. This program sifts through the complexity of the animal-god concept, identifying the place of the lion, the giraffe, the wolf, the elephant, and many other creatures in a wide range of myths and religions. With detailed observations of sculpture, carvings, and statuary-including Native American totem poles, European gargoyles and grotesques, and Egyptian mummies honoring the cat-headed goddess Ubasti-the video demonstrates an age-old interconnection between our reverence for nature and our need to determine our status in it.
Online
2007; 2005
57.

Essentials of Faith [electronic resource]: Paganism

Drawing on ancient spirituality, most pagans sum up their chosen form of worship within a modern "green" context. Some follow druidry, others wicca, while a third brand promotes the shamanism of hunter-gatherer cultures. This program sheds light on various examples of pagan devotion put forward by four observers of ancient religious rites and customs. Through straightforward explanations and heartfelt expression, the sundry shapes and species of Paganism are explained by Druid priestess Emma Restall Orr, Professor Ronald Hutton of the University of Bristol, British coven organizer Jeanette Ellis, and shamanic practitioner Leo Rutherford.
Online
2006
58.

The Politics of Belief [electronic resource]: Protestantism and the State

Although Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to a church door, his action sparked a political upheaval as well as a religious one. This program examines the rise of the Protestant movement in Europe and its link to revolution, civil war, and modern incarnations of radical and conservative politics. Studying the theology Luther crafted at Wartburg Castle and his confrontations with papal and secular authorities, the film explores Thomas Muntzer's bloody appropriation of Protestant ideals, the Levellers' movement under Cromwell, the birth of the British Labor Party, the role of Baptist teachings in the American civil rights movement, and the conservative Protestantism embodied in the presidency of George W. Bush.
Online
2009; 2006
59.

The Godly Family [electronic resource]: Protestantism in the Home

Martin Luther's most effective strike against the Church may have been his decision to marry. This program shows how Luther's radical choice and the Protestant movements of the 16th and 17th centuries transformed Western attitudes toward sex, love, marriage, gender roles, and family life. Viewers will learn about the contributions of several historical figures, including Thomas Cranmer's versions of the Book of Common Prayer, the misogynist rhetoric of John Knox, Richard Baxter's unexpected marriage and its implications, and the straitlaced culture promoted by Queen Victoria. The progression away from Victorian strictures and the inclusion of women and gays in the clergy are also studied.
Online
2009; 2006
60.

A Reformation of the Mind [electronic resource]: Protestantism and Western Culture

At the core of the Protestant Revolution was a new emphasis on exploring and questioning the natural world. This program shows how a religious upheaval that began a half-millennium ago led to the art, literature, and science of today's Western society. The film makes the case that a humanistic approach to art first grew out of the Protestant drive to remove images from European churches in the 16th and 17th centuries. It also examines the development of the modern novel via the Protestant-informed writings of John Bunyan, Daniel DeFoe, and Charles Dickens-then reveals the Protestant underpinnings of Newtonian physics, Darwin's theories, and our technological culture.
Online
2009; 2006