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1.

Rat Film

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"A unique blend of history, sci-fi, poetry and portraiture, Rat Film ... breaks documentary norms and dissects how racial segregation, redlining, and environmental racism built the Baltimore we see today."--Container.
DVD
2017; 2016
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

I Am Not Your Negro

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Master documentary filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin's original words and a flood of rich archival material. A journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter.
DVD
2017; 2016
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
3.

Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity

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"In the U.S., race --more than any other demographic factor-- determines levels of individual educational achievement, health and life expectancy, possibility of incarceration, and wealth. This film reveals a self-perpetuating system of inequity in which internal factors play out in external structures: institutions, policy and law. Designed for dialogue and learning, Cracking the codes : the system of racial inequity works to disentangle internal beliefs within, as it builds skills to recognize and address the external drivers of inequity"--Container.
DVD
2012
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Woodlawn

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In 1973, a spiritual awakening captured the heart of nearly every player of the Woodlawn High School football team, including its coach Tandy Gerelds. Their dedication to love and unity in a school filled with racism and hate leads to the largest high school football game ever played in the torn city of Birmingham, Alabama, and the rise of its first African American superstar, Tony Nathan.
DVD
2016; 2015
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
5.

American Denial

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"In 1938, Swedish researcher and Nobel Laureate Gunnar Myrdal plunges into America's Jim Crow South. His resulting study, An American dilemma (1944), poses a profoundly unsettling question: How can a people devoted to the American creed of equality, justice and opportunity for all continue to erect obstacles to those ends based on race? Through Myrdal's story and contemporary racial dynamics, the film explores how denial, cognitive dissonance, and implicit bias persist and shape all of our lives"--From container.
DVD
2014
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

The Life and Times of Sara Baartman: "The Hottentot Venus"

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A documentary of the life a Khoikhoi woman who was taken from South Africa in 1810 and exhibited as a freak across Britain. The image and ideas for "The Hottentot Venus" (particularly the interest in her sexual anatomy) swept through British popular culture. A court battle waged by abolitionists to free her from her exhibitors failed. In 1814, a year before her death, she was taken to France and became the object of scientific research that formed the bedrock of European ideas about black female sexuality.
DVD
2008; 2010
Clemons (Stacks)
7.

Columbia Revolt, 1968

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Online
1968
8.

Intifada NYC [electronic resource]: The Khalil Gibran Academy and Post-9/11 Politics

In 2007, the first Arabic language public school in the U.S. opened in New York City, generating a tidal wave of controversy. This program follows the Khalil Gibran International Academy's turbulent beginnings; the political firestorm that culminated in the resignation of Debbie Almontaser, the academy's founding principal; and Almontaser's legal battle to get her job back. The compelling narrative combines news clips, interviews with key players in the controversy, and graphic novel-style drawings for added visual interest-shedding light on important First Amendment concepts as well as the "Stop the Madrassa" campaign that accused the school of harboring Islamist influences.
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Words and Actions [electronic resource]: Contexts and Consequences of Propaganda-From the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Sandwiched between the fictional countries of Northland and Southland lies Midrain Province. Drawing upon a hypothetical situation involving mounting tensions between the Southlanders and the Midrainians, this seminar, moderated by NYU Professor Arthur Miller and filmed on location at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, explores the role of propaganda in situations where genocide is threatened and examines how the use of propaganda during the Holocaust era informs public reaction to its dissemination today. Compelling questions spark a crackling discussion with echoes of Rwanda, Bosnia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo as positions that seem clear in the abstract quickly become muddied by the reality of lives hanging in the balance. Panelists include Princeton Univer [...]
Online
2010; 2008
10.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: An Optimist for Our Times

Angela Blackwell has spent her adult life advocating practical ways to fulfill America's promise of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" for all. Now, with our middle class struggling, poverty rising, and inequality growing, the founder and chief executive officer of PolicyLink, an influential research center, finds reasons for hope. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers and Blackwell discuss what fuels her optimism. "I'm not discouraged, and I wouldn't even dream of giving up, because we're at a moment right now where I think we have more possibility than I've seen in my adult lifetime," Blackwell tells Moyers. "So many people who are being left behind are now in places where they have voice and influence.... America doesn't want to talk about race, but the futur [...]
Online
2012
11.

Buffalo Soldiers [electronic resource]: An American Legacy

By the end of the Civil War, nearly 200,000 black soldiers were serving in the Federal Army. After the war many decided not to return to a life of sharecropping and racial oppression, instead volunteering to battle outlaws and Indian raiders along the western frontier. This program uses dazzling reenactments and the expertise of military historians to tell the multifaceted story of the Buffalo Soldiers, a name given to black troops by their Native American adversaries. Viewers learn about the daily lives and daunting assignments of these proud African-Americans, the harsh environments in which they conducted missions, and the deeds of individual Buffalo Soldiers such as Sgt. Emanuel Stance, Lt. George Burnett, and Henry Flipper - the first black cadet to graduate from West Point, who [...]
Online
2011
12.

Minds That Matter [electronic resource]: John Lewis

No one grasps the connections between social activism, electoral politics, and racial issues better than Congressman John Lewis (D-GA), perhaps the most prominent living veteran of the American civil rights movement. In 2007, he received the Robert J. Dole Leadership Prize from the University of Kansas and, in conjunction with the award, granted this in-depth interview before a live audience. Rep. Lewis discusses an epic range of topics, including his childhood in segregated Alabama; his first meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; the back-stage dilemma over his speech at the finale of the March on Washington; his role in the attempted march from Selma to Montgomery; the ongoing need for social activism today; and more.
Online
2009; 2008
13.

What's Your Point, Honey? [electronic resource]: Young Women Prepare for Leadership

She's out there somewhere. She may be a complete unknown, or she may already be in the public spotlight, but sooner or later the first female president of the United States will emerge. While openly acknowledging today's inequalities, this film puts a new face on America's future by introducing several promising young leaders, all of them women. Viewers learn about an innovative program created by CosmoGirl magazine and the White House Project, designed to encourage young women to pursue management roles and to think of themselves as potential office holders. Interwoven with the stories of these hopeful, ambitious interns are conversations with feminist thinkers and activists from previous generations - including the iconic Gloria Steinem, who reflects on her personal journey as well [...]
Online
2008
14.

Anatomy of Hate [electronic resource]: A Dialogue for Hope

To make this film, director Michael Ramsdell spent six years among organizations that define themselves in ideological opposition to other groups, sometimes with extreme hatred. As he spent time with white supremacists, Muslim extremists, militant fundamentalist Christians, participants on both sides of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and American combatants in Iraq, he began to unravel the mystery of the anatomy of hate. The resulting documentary mixes profoundly disturbing footage of racist and antigay tirades with interviews from sociologists and neuroscientists who explain the psychological - rather than political or religious - mechanisms that make people take violent action against other groups. Throughout the film, stories of redemption told by former hate group members prov [...]
Online
2009
15.

Where Do We Go From Here? [electronic resource]: A Dialogue on Race

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. This illuminating program, filmed during a guided tour of civil rights landmarks, blends potent archival footage and photos with group discussion to sensitively explore race relations in the U.S. Visits to Selma, Montgomery, Birmingham, Memphis, Atlanta, Orangeburg, and other locations, combined with eyewitness accounts of key events by survivors of those years, steer the group's dialogue. Together, these concerned individuals-white as well as black-grapple with the issues of anger, identity, prejudice, discrimination, education, and reconciliation.
Online
2005; 2000
16.

Mississippi Cold Case [electronic resource]: Solving a Murder From the Civil Rights Era

In the summer of 1964, two black teenagers, Charles Moore and Henry Dee, were found murdered in Louisiana. The atrocity was soon eclipsed by the "Mississippi Burning" case and forgotten. Forty years later, Moore's brother Thomas and CBC documentary filmmaker David Ridgen reignited a quest for justice. This award-winning film documents their investigation, which included the remarkable discovery that one of the suspects-a Ku Klux Klansman named James Ford Seale, presumed to have died years earlier-was in fact alive. Viewers will learn how the efforts of Moore and Ridgen led federal authorities to reopen the case and, after a legal roller-coaster ride, secure an indictment, a trial, and a conviction.
Online
2009; 2007
17.

Black/White & Brown [electronic resource]: Brown V. The Board of Education of Topeka

Myths, misconceptions, and the march of time have obscured the true origins and legal details of Brown v. The Board of Education. This fascinating program connects viewers with the people, places, events, and ideas that shaped the landmark civil rights case. Interviewees include Cheryl Brown Henderson, daughter of lead plaintiff Oliver Brown; Zelma Henderson, who, until her death in 2008, was the only surviving Brown plaintiff; and the children of other plaintiffs, attorneys, and activists. Civil rights leader Roger Wilkins and other scholars provide additional expertise on the roles played by the NAACP and the U.S. Justice Department.
Online
2009; 2004
18.

Conclusion at Appomattox [electronic resource]: War Ends, But Not Its Impact

In 1865, the laying down of arms was just the beginning of the long battle for equal rights facing African-Americans. After documenting the final months of the War Between the States-Lincoln's second inauguration, Sherman's march through the Carolinas, the Siege of Petersburg, the destruction of Richmond, General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, and Lincoln's assassination-this program considers the outcome of the war and its cost, Reconstruction, the century of racism and segregation following the war, and the emergence of Martin Luther King, Jr., as the voice of the civil rights movement. Commentary by Eric Foner, Shelby Foote, and James McPherson is featured.
Online
2009; 1987
19.

Martin Luther King, Jr. [electronic resource]: Look Here

One of the first in-depth televised interviews given by Martin Luther King, Jr., this program was first broadcast on October 27, 1957, on the NBC News show Look Here. Filmed only a year after he had reached national prominence during the Montgomery bus boycott, the 27-year-old King offers host Martin Agronsky invaluable insights into his goals, his philosophy, and his unshakable dedication to equality and civil rights.
Online
2008; 2007
20.

Affirmative Action and Reaction [electronic resource]

This program examines the issue of affirmative action with Lani Guinier, professor of law at the Univ. of Pennsylvania and President Clinton's controversial nominee for Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. Among the many questions examined in the program are: How do blacks and whites differ in their understanding of affirmative action? Is affirmative action still necessary to remedy past discrimination? What changes, if any, should be made to affirmative action programs?
Online
2005; 1995