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2.

The Way Home

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"Over the course of eight months, sixty-four women, representing a cross-section of cultures in America, came together to share their experiences of oppression through the lens of race. Separated into eight ethnic councils, (Indigenous, African-American, Arab, Asian, European-American, Jewish, Latina and multi-racial) the women explore their stories of identity, oppression, and resistance. It is the intention of World Trust to use this video as a catalyst for powerful learning, healing and transformation"--Container.
DVD
2010; 1998
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

The Redfern Story

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This film documents the efforts made through activism and theatre to bring the cause of indigenous people to public notice, as a first step towards gaining land rights and better treatment. Redfern became a thriving and vibrant melting pot of politics, art and creativity. This is Darlene's tribute to those pioneers who were at the coal-face to bring about change.
DVD
2014
4.

Mr. Patterns

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Geoff Bardon, an art teacher in Papunya Australia, presents the art of the Papunya Tula which is commonly known as dot painting. He observed that the culture of the Aboriginals was being destroyed so he was instrumental in encouraging them to paint their traditional designs using western materials. Beginning with children's projects he later included the elders whose paintings were inspired by their ancestral roots. Although he was successful with the projects with the Aboriginals it was not without personal sacrifice, as he was reviled by the white population who did not want the racial tensions which existed between the Aboriginals and them to be exposed.
VHS
2004
5.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Bryan Stevenson - We Need to Talk About an Injustice

In an engaging and personal TEDtalk - with cameo appearances by his grandmother and Rosa Parks - human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America's justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country's black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America's unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight, and persuasiveness. Stevenson is the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative.
Online
2012
6.

Taking a Stance Against Racism and Discrimination [electronic resource]

They're an average American family at a typical American restaurant. They also happen to be Hispanic (not to mention that the restaurant is situated in Tucson, Arizona, a hub of our nation's ongoing immigration debate) From out of nowhere, an off-duty security guard asks to see their documentation, and as he grows more insistent, the other diners nervously consider what steps, if any, to take. It's a scenario drawn from real life, no doubt, but in this case, the guard and the family are actors in a hidden-camera ABC News segment-one designed to spark reactions from onlookers. Several other staged dilemmas are also included here: Jewish customers face an anti-Semitic cashier, hearing-impaired job seekers aren't allowed to fill out applications, an HIV-positive man is subjected to verb [...]
Online
2010
7.

A Film About Races [electronic resource]: A Fresh Look at Diversity

An exploration of the notion of race, this program follows host Paul Duddridge as he pushes aside society's taboos to find out what "race" really is. Duddridge organizes a mini-Olympics based on racial identity to demonstrate the fluidity of the concept - he notes that Jews and Arabs will be on the same team - and the participants poke fun at their own tendency to stereotype. With significant input from sociologists, anthropologists, and authors including John Baugh (Beyond Ebonics), Kwame Anthony Appiah (The Ethics of Identity) and Jon Entine (Abraham's Children: Race, Identity and the DNA of the Chosen People), the video examines some common misconceptions about race.
Online
2010
8.

Growing Up Hispanic [electronic resource]: Children in Crisis

Reports from reputable medical sources reveal a statistical correlation between healthcare issues and poor academic performance in Hispanic communities nationwide. In this program, the National Council of La Raza's Raul Yzaguirre, former Surgeon General David Satcher, the Hispanic Dental Association's Nelson Artiga, and other experts address the pervasive health concerns-most notably dental problems and pediatric obesity-and insufficient access to healthcare that plague America's Hispanic population, significantly undermining Latino children's education as well as long-term well-being. Health initiatives in California, Texas, Florida, and New York are featured, along with case studies from those states.
Online
2006; 2003
9.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Richard Rodriguez on Being American

As the entrenched racial labels "white" and "black" become less and less meaningful, Richard Rodriguez sees a definite future for a new one: "brown." In this program, Bill Moyers talks with the acclaimed memoirist, journalist, and social critic about the ways race, culture, class, and religion are reshaping the concept of identity in America today. Rodriguez's discussion with Moyers exposes many of the contradictions and convergences that make being a 21st-century American so complex and yet so compelling. Topics include bilingual education, affirmative action, Spanish Catholicism, and the implications of what it means to be brown. Three of Rodriguez's books-Hunger of Memory, Days of Obligation, and Brown-are featured as well.
Online
2005; 2002
10.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Zaid Shakir on Being Muslim in America

Muslims have lived in the U.S. for centuries. Should the work of Islamist extremists be allowed to undermine their place in American society? This program captures a spirited discussion between Bill Moyers and Imam Zaid Shakir, who details his experiences as both a Muslim and an American in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. In addition, Imam Zaid describes the structure and comprehensiveness of Islam, the compatibility of core Islamic and American values, and the tragic misuse of Islam as justification for terrorism. He also talks about morality in government, the concept of Islamic civilization as contrasted with Islamic statehood, Muslim anger with American foreign policy, and the levels of jihad.
Online
2005; 2002
11.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Azizah Al-Hibri on Interfaith Dialogue

By applying her deep knowledge of the Quran and the U.S. Constitution to issues involving democracy and women's rights, Azizah al-Hibri has been instrumental in nurturing an urgently needed interfaith dialogue both at home and abroad. In this program, Bill Moyers and Dr. al-Hibri explore her role as a bridge builder between Muslims and non-Muslims as she advocates conflict resolution through mediation, not violence. She also addresses Arab animosity toward the U.S., America's tarnished image in the eyes of many Middle Eastern countries, and the hijacking of Islam for political ends, using the 9/11 attacks as a powerful case in point.
Online
2005; 2002
12.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: John Esposito on the Struggles of Islam

In this program, Bill Moyers and Georgetown University's John Esposito-author of Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam and editor-in-chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World-focus on Islam in Asia, where the vast majority of all Muslims live. The conflict within Islamic countries among religious fundamentalists, radical extremists, and the moderate mainstream is considered, along with American geopolitical concerns in the war on global terrorism. Human rights abuses in Indonesia and East Timor, the operation of al Qaeda, and a distinction between holy war and jihad are examined as well. "Can we fight terrorism without it becoming a worldwide clash of cultures?" asks Moyers.
Online
2005; 2002
13.

Prom Night in Taylor County, Georgia [electronic resource]: Separate and Equal?

Breaking with the tacit practice of separate, student-sponsored proms, teens at a racially diverse high school in Georgia recently tried having only one dance, for all students. One year later they scrapped the idea. Is this a black-and-white case of racism, or is it somehow grayer than that? In this ABC News program, anchor Chris Bury and correspondent Jim Wooten give a balanced report on attitudes toward race in Taylor County as they play out in the halls of learning. How do parallel proms, class presidents, and cheerleading squads reconcile with an otherwise multiracial student body and consolidated, title-winning sports teams?
Online
2006; 2003
14.

Wearing Hijab [electronic resource]: Uncovering the Myths of Islam in the United States

In America, there are many misconceptions about Islam, particularly concerning its distinctive veil known as hijab. But how do Muslim women in this country who wear hijab feel about it? In this program, six Muslim women from six different ethnic backgrounds discuss their relation to this traditional garment, as well as what it means in a more general way to practice Islam in the U.S. Interviews with spouses and family members also shed light on the spiritual and cultural dimensions of this practice.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Africans in America [electronic resource]: Unfolding of Ethnic Identity

This program uses in-depth interviews with two generations of five African families now living in the Denver area to explore the dynamic process that is ethnic identity. Having emigrated from Ghana, Uganda, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria, the families bring unique traditions to a shared experience: life in America. The interviews reveal the hopes of the first generation for the second, the thoughts and feelings of both parents and children on cultural transition, their sense of self as they live in America and interact with others, and their pride in adding to the rich national tapestry.
Online
2006; 2002
16.

Tomorrow's Islam [electronic resource]

Both in principle and historically, Islam is a pluralistic and progressive faith. Unfortunately, world events involving extremist groups and fundamentalist regimes have projected a distorted image of the religion into the West. In this program, devout Muslim intellectuals-Ridwan al-Killidar, of the Al Khoei Foundation; Baroness Pola Manzila Uddin, the first Muslim woman to sit in Britain's House of Lords; the "Muslim Martin Luther," Tariq Ramadan; fiery Brookings scholar Muqtedar Khan; and others-correct misconceptions while envisioning an Islam that is at home in a modernized, interconnected world: one that retains the best of the tradition while embracing ijtihad, individual reformist thinking, to adapt the religion to the 21st century.
Online
2006; 2003
17.

Multicultural Perspectives on Adults With Developmental Disabilities [electronic resource]

Community-based caregiving is a vital mode of support for older adults with developmental disabilities. This insightful and uplifting program examines how, within Hispanic, African-American, and Asian-American cultural contexts, the needs of high-functioning members of this population are being met through the empowering assistance of their families and through healthcare- and employment-related programs that promote self-determination. The importance of service providers who share their clients' respective cultures and, where necessary, speak Asian languages or Spanish is underscored.
Online
2006; 2002
18.

The Witness [electronic resource]: From the Balcony of Room 306

I wondered for many years, reveals the Rev. Billy Kyles, "why I was there at that crucial moment." Rev. Kyles stood only a few feet away from Dr. Martin Luther King when the eminent civil rights leader was assassinated. This Academy Award-nominated documentary features Rev. Kyles' reflections on the tragedy-and on the events leading up to it, most notably the sanitation workers' strike that Dr. King had come to Memphis to support. A compelling view into the development of the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign, the film includes interviews with Maxine Smith, then executive secretary of the Memphis NAACP branch, and Dr. Benjamin Hooks, former NAACP executive director.
Online
2009; 2008
19.

Upstream Battle [electronic resource]: Case Study in Native American Fishing Rights

The Karuk, Yurok, and Hoopa peoples live along northern California's Klamath River, and each tribe's ancient culture revolves around the majestic Pacific salmon. Today, four large hydroelectric dams have made salmon extinction a real and frightening possibility. This case study follows tribal members as they confront the owners of the dams-specifically, a global energy giant in Scotland which is subsequently bought out by Warren Buffett's corporate empire. Will tribal members manage to persuade the richest man in the world to save their salmon and their societies? Irrigation and commercial fishing also figure into this desperate battle over the life of a river.
Online
2009; 2008
20.

Conversation [electronic resource]: Delany Sisters

In this classic interview with NewsHour correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Having Our Say authors Sarah and Bessie Delany discuss the trials and triumphs of their first 100 years. Their subjects include life in the South for African-Americans in the early 20th century, coping with the implementation of the Jim Crow laws, and bigotry in the North. Bessie touches on what it was like to grow up with a father who recalled slavery and the arrival of freedom after the Confederate surrender. Sarah tells how, as a young woman, she defended herself against a drunk white man at a Georgia train station and how she found ways around the institutionalized racism in New York City's education system.
Online
2009; 1994