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1.

Bill Moyers Journal [electronic resource]: Humanitarian Greg Mortenson / Historian Thomas Frank

America has committed billions of dollars to escalate military action in Afghanistan and Pakistan, using war as a tool for peace. In this edition of the Journal, Bill Moyers considers a different path to peace with humanitarian Greg Mortenson, author of Three Cups of Tea and Stones into Schools, as they discuss Mortenson's efforts to build schools and nurture communities in that embattled region. Moyers also speaks with historian and columnist Thomas Frank about the state of the Union when Obama took office and the lessons of the preceding years Frank calls "a low, dishonest decade." An essay on the cost of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan - and the hypothetical trade-offs made to fund them - concludes the program.
Online
2010
2.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Eric Berlow - How Complexity Leads to Simplicity

Ecologist Eric Berlow doesn't feel overwhelmed when faced with complex systems. He knows that more information can lead to a better, simpler solution. Illustrating the tips and tricks for breaking down big issues, he distills an overwhelming infographic on U.S. strategy in Afghanistan to a few elementary points.
Online
2010
3.

Making the World Safe for Democracy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

As the United States reshaped Manifest Destiny for use in the 20th century, the concept came to be equated not with conquest and expansion, but with the spread of American values and institutions. Focusing on World War I and the Russian Revolution, the section "A New World Order" traces the deflected trajectory of President Wilson's idealistic plan to export democracy - a plan that ended in compromises and broken dreams. "Containment," which begins with World War II, examines the spread of communism in Asia and U.S. opposition to it via the Kennan policy of containment and the Truman Doctrine. And "Quagmire" discusses how the Kennedy and Johnson administrations felt duty-bound to escalate American political and military involvement in Vietnam as a part of an ideological proxy war bet [...]
Online
2010
4.

To Conquer or Redeem [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

With the closing of the American West, Manifest Destiny was in need of new direction. The section "New Frontiers" considers implications of Frederick Jackson Turner's Frontier Thesis as it scrutinizes U.S. history from the end of the Gilded Age to the brink of the Spanish-American War. "An Empire of Liberty" takes a step back to assess aspects of Manifest Destiny from its birth during the pre-Revolutionary era through Reconstruction. And "Benevolent Assimilation" provides an in-depth look at the Spanish-American War, the Philippines Insurrection, the annexations of Puerto Rico and Hawaii, and U.S. intervention in China during the Boxer Rebellion to illustrate how expanded economic influence, military might, and presidential powers contributed to U.S. imperialism during the administra [...]
Online
2010
5.

The Grand War of Civilizations [electronic resource]

For decades, Iraq was Saddam Hussein's sadistic stomping ground. Then it became George W. Bush's ideological battlefield. The pivot point was 9/11 and a perceived link between Saddam and al Qaeda, bringing calls for an invasion from top American and Western leaders. This program examines the consequences of that hasty decision-making process: misadventure on a grand scale, according to many observers, and an extremist backlash that engulfed Iraq in bloodshed. Viewers meet retired Major General James Marks, senior intelligence officer for coalition land forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom, and gain insight as to why the occupation and counter-insurgency faced so many problems. Events in both Fallujah and Baghdad are studied. Numerous accounts from victims of sectarian violence, ques [...]
Online
2011
6.

A New Muslim World? [electronic resource]

Osama bin Laden's death in 2011 was clearly a milestone in America's war on terror, but for those who study dramatic shifts in the West's relationship with the Islamic world, no event can compare with the Arab Spring. What does the wave of regime-toppling revolution and democratization that began in Tunisia in 2010 mean for the future of the Middle East and for international relations in general? This program searches for answers as it shows how the Arab Spring took root and expanded into the multifaceted movement that continues even today. It also shows how terrorist networks, hate-driven organizations, and hawkish governments still foment violent face-offs with their avowed adversaries, even as greater openness and individual freedoms appear across the Arab-speaking world. Developm [...]
Online
2011
7.

Bogged Down [electronic resource]

Terrorism. Extremism. Religious and sectarian violence. Should we study political and socioeconomic patterns in order to understand why these tragedies occur? Or are they far simpler than that? Are they ultimately about hate and nothing more? Traveling to three focal points of conflict, this program explores 21st-century manifestations of an age-old human problem - the need to destroy others who appear inferior, unworthy, or unholy - and how that flaw in the social psyche shapes today's clash of civilizations. Starting with U.S. President Barack Obama's 2009 Cairo speech as a reference point of moderation, the film spans the globe as it explores an entire spectrum of hate-driven behavior - from the Taliban's brutal repression of anything deemed un-Islamic (such as CD shops and kite f [...]
Online
2011
8.

Bad Voodoo's War [electronic resource]

As a small part of the 2007 American military surge in Iraq, a group of National Guard infantrymen who call themselves The Bad Voodoo Platoon was deployed to run convoy security missions. Capturing the humanity and the grim realities of the Iraq war, this Frontline episode incorporates first-person accounts from Bad Voodoo soldiers and video from cameras given to them so that they could tell their own story of the conflict. As a result, viewers will closely follow platoon members through the perilous journeys and daily grinds of their tour of duty.
Online
2008
9.

Monsters to Destroy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

With the collapse of the U.S.S.R., suddenly the U.S. was the sole superpower - a militaristic global leader with no clear enemy or foreign policy goal. The section "New World Disorder" illustrates the unprecedented turbulence of the fractured post - Cold War world during the George H. W. Bush administration: the Tiananmen Square protests, the U.S. invasion of Panama, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War, ethnic cleansing in the Balkans and Rwanda, and famine in Somalia. "Indispensable Nation" analyzes President Clinton's inability to create a demilitarized Manifest Destiny based solely on trade and economic growth. And "Smarter Than History" uses pivotal events from the George W. Bush presidency - the 9/11 attacks and the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq - to examine the compro [...]
Online
2011
10.

Falling Towers [electronic resource]

Why 19 hijackers turned themselves into lethal weapons on September 11, 2001, will probably never be fully understood. But can we form a rough image of their mind-set? Can we glimpse the skewed worldview that led them to terrorism, and what will that tell us about American and global reactions that came in the wake of 9/11? This program pursues those questions as it gathers insight about the attacks and their aftermath. A conversation with Andrew Card - chief of staff under George W. Bush and the official who first informed the president of the World Trade Center strikes - segues to an interview with a former Guantanamo Bay prison guard, followed by further discussion of the changes in American foreign and domestic policy wrought by the war on terror. The film also examines the reper [...]
Online
2011
11.

War on the Home Front [electronic resource]

After 9/11, America's stated mission was to "bring the fight to the terrorists." Iraq and Afghanistan became, in essence, two battlefields in the West's war on terror. But what happens when terror rises from the very soil that foreign wars are waged to protect? Are European countries in particular overlooking the need to fight a different kind of fight, one in which the hearts and minds of their own citizens are at stake? This program looks at developments in England and Belgium (the correspondent's native country) in an effort to understand how radicalism can take root after being imported from extremist hotbeds in Pakistan and other Islamic countries. Viewers meet worshippers from mosques where the London subway bombers of 2005 were radicalized, two Brussels detectives who broke up [...]
Online
2011
12.

Back Door Channels [electronic resource]: The Price of Peace - Egypt and Israel in 1979

Filmed in Israel, Egypt, Morocco, Austria, France, and the U.S., this documentary examines one of the most difficult diplomatic achievements of the 20th century: the 1979 Camp David Peace Accord and Treaty between Egypt and Israel. Viewers learn the inside story of the agreement, for which U.S. President Jimmy Carter (who is interviewed in the film), Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and Egyptian President Anwar El-Sadat served as the public architects. As the film illustrates, brilliant strategic minds were also at work behind the scenes, including former U.S. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, former Egyptian Foreign Minister (and UN Secretary General) Boutros Boutros-Ghali, former Carter advisor Leon Charney, and numerous other key players who describe their exper [...]
Online
2011; 2013
13.

Ethics [electronic resource]: Who Decides Now What Is Right?

What values should we consider universal and worth preserving for posterity? Do we need a new paradigm of civil and global interaction, or are the best answers to current human problems still found in long-standing moral traditions - even if they are subjective and disparate? This program spotlights scholars and philosophers who explore profound questions of ethics, morality, evil, and idealism. Insight comes from moral philosopher Susan Neiman, author of Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy and Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grown-Up Idealists; South African poet Antjie Krog, recipient of the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation Award (2000); Canadian intellectual Charles Taylor, author of A Secular Age; Quranic scholar Nasr Abu Zayd, who left Egypt after fundament [...]
Online
2010
14.

Haiti [electronic resource]: Where Did the Money Go?

After a 7.0 earthquake brutalized Haiti in January of 2010, Americans donated a stunning
Online
2011
15.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Madeleine Albright, on Being a Woman and a Diplomat

Since leaving the office of U.S. Secretary of State in 2001, Madeleine Albright has continued her distinguished career in foreign affairs as a political adviser, professor, and businesswoman. In this TEDTalk she speaks bluntly about politics and diplomacy, making the case that women's issues deserve a place at the center of foreign policy. Far from being "soft" concerns, says Albright, the strengths and vulnerabilities of women around the world are linked to profound, life-or-death struggles.
Online
2011
16.

Waves of Liberty [electronic resource]

In this program the author of Sparks of Liberty: An Insider's Memoir of Radio Liberty reviews the origins, struggles, and eventual demise of the American radio station that broadcast directly to the Soviet people starting with the Cold War. Funded by the CIA, Radio Liberty's stated mission was to provide objective information about culture and current events to those without a free press, like its sister stations Radio Free Europe and Voice of America. Former employees discuss working at Radio Liberty's Spanish location - where it was moved to avoid Soviet jamming of transmissions - its content, and the logistics of conveying information in the pre-Internet age.
Online
2007
17.

Words of War [electronic resource]

Words of War is an original examination of how presidents rhetorically move a nation to war. Topics explored include provocation: "The deeds of our enemy are evil"; justification: "War is in our national interests"; lamentation: "We hate war"; and inspiration: "We will win!" Illuminating and discussion-provoking.
Online
2004
18.

Robot Warriors [electronic resource]: The Shape of Armies to Come

While drones are perhaps the most talked-about products of cutting-edge military technology, the field of combat robotics is rapidly expanding beyond the use of remote-controlled aircraft. This film clearly shows that in modern warfare, artificial intelligence concepts that once belonged strictly in the realm of science fiction are now evolving into real-world applications. From battlefield reconnaissance to rescue operations conducted under fire, viewers learn about a wide range of computerized, mechanized "warriors" designed to fight like human soldiers. Case studies include a snake-like robot that can scout around corners or in dangerous confined spaces; a mobile medic capable of reaching, lifting, and transporting fallen human comrades; a small hovercraft that can be steered by h [...]
Online
2010
19.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Are Drones Destroying Our Democracy?

In the fight against terrorism, the U.S. military's escalating drone program has become the face of our foreign policy in Pakistan, Yemen, and parts of Africa. And while the use of unmanned drones indeed protects American soldiers, the growing number of casualties - which include civilians as well as suspected terrorists - has prompted a UN investigation into both the legality and the deadly toll of these strikes. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill explores the moral and legal implications of using drones to target our enemies, both foreign and American. His guests include Vicki Divoll, a former general counsel to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and former deputy legal adviser to the CIA's Counterterrorism Center, and Vincent Warren, executive director of the Cente [...]
Online
2013
20.

WMD [electronic resource]: Weapons of Mass Deception

According to investigative journalist Danny Schechter, the U.S. conducted two wars in Iraq in 2003: one was a military assault, and the other was a media assault on the American public, or what he calls "jingoism posing as journalism." In this carefully-researched documentary, Schechter argues that the Pentagon employed classic propaganda techniques to control media coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Schechter uses insider interviews and a wealth of news clips to explain how the Pentagon pulled it off and why the media complied. From Jessica Lynch's manufactured hero story to the Lynndie England torture photos to the bogus reports that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, Schechter builds a case that is corroborated by respected mainstream news sources. With commentary from Peter [...]
Online
2004