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1.

Blind Spot: A Documentary Film

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Blind Spot is a documentary that illustrates the current energy crisis that our way of life is facing. Whatever measures of greed, wishful thinking, neglect or ignorance, we have put ourselves at a crossroad which offers two paths, both with dire consequences. If we continue to burn fossil fuels, we will choke the life out of the planet, and if we don't, our way of life will collapse.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

What a Way to Go: Life at the End of Empire

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"A middle class white guy comes to grips with Peak Oil, Climate Change, Mass Extinction, Population Overshoot and the demise of the American lifestyle. ... Featuring interviews with Daniel Quinn, Derrick Jensen, Jerry Mander, Chellis Glendinning, Richard Heinberg, Thomas Berry, William Catton, Ran Prieur and Richard Manning, What a Way to Go looks at the current global situation and asks the most important questions of all: How did we get here? Why do we keep destroying the planet? What do we truly want? Can we find a vision that will empower us to do what is necessary to survive, and even thrive, in the coming decades?" -- Home page http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Oil & Energy

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The world demand for energy will increase by 50% before 2020. Oil will continue to dominate markets, but all energy sources will be needed. Energy executives discuss technology, transportation, distribution, markets and cartels.
VHS
1996
Ivy (By Request)
4.

History of the 20th Century: The Nuclear Age

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One of a 26-part series that offers a comprehensive look at the many facets of the twentieth century, including rare archival footage and interviews with participants in major events. This segment provides a historical perspective on one of the major developments of the century: the development and use of the atomic bomb. Tells the story of the atom bomb, from the dramatic beginnings of the nuclear age at the end of World War II, through the arms race of the Cold War, to the great disarmament agreements of the 1980s. Looks at the peaceful uses of nuclear power, from the euphoria over the harnessing of this new source of energy to the more skeptical views of the post-Chernobyl disaster years. Among those interviewed are a nuclear scientist who was part of the team that built the first [...]
VHS
1996; 1995
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Heat: A Global Investigation

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Facing pressure from governments, green groups and investors alike, big business is promising to reshape it's approach to the environment. Martin Smith travels the globe to test what big business is really doing to solve this urgent issue.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

Solar Prints [electronic resource]

What do plastic bank notes have to do with solar energy? In this video clip, hear from Australian scientists developing solar cells made with the same polymer technology. Every hour, there's more energy from the sun hitting the Earth than all of the energy consumed on our planet in a year. But our use of solar technology to capture and store that energy is still just a drop in the ocean. The advantage of polymer is it can be twisted, it can be molded, it can be shaped so it can go on rooftops, provided it can survive the sunlight, and, most importantly, it is cheap.
Online
2009
7.

Climate Change [electronic resource]

Scientific alarm about the risks of climate change is rising as quickly as the greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels. In this video segment, meet scientist Ian Goodwin, who works in Australia's Hunter Valley, where much of the world's black coal comes from. He started out as a junior scientist working on an environmental impact assessment of what was then going to be the largest open cut coalmine in the world. Little did he know that thirty years later the impacts of what then seemed like a local endeavor would be affecting the whole planet.
Online
2010
8.

A Changing World [electronic resource]

According to some forecasts, the Arctic Ocean will be seasonally ice-free by the summer of 2013 - a nightmare that is driving environmentalists to find ways to minimize the damage. But for energy prospectors, climate change brings new opportunities as more and more deposits of oil, gas, and minerals become accessible. This program focuses on competing interests racing to control Arctic resources and territories. Dr. Ruth Jackson, from Nova Scotia's Bedford Institute of Oceanography, heads the team mapping the seabed in support of Canada's claims. As the work of Dr. Jackson and other researchers shows, scientists as well as nations must contend with the Arctic's icy politics. In one scene, a Canadian-led venture is thwarted when a deal to hire a Russian icebreaker falls through.
Online
2009
9.

An Uncertain Future [electronic resource]

There are two different Arctics. One is the storybook land of snow and polar bears, while the other has become a breeding ground of petroleum plants and pipelines. Can the two coexist? What fate awaits the natural Arctic if the technological one expands without restraint? This program explores those questions as it follows research taking place on Bylot Island, home to a portion of Sirmilik National Park, in Canada's Nunavut Territory. Here, scientists have come every summer for the past 20 years to measure the impact of climate change on snowy owls, lemmings, snow geese, and Arctic foxes. Here, they have discovered that even tiny, hardy plants are being affected, causing a cascade of changes through the ecosystem.
Online
2009
10.

The Arctic Passage [electronic resource]

Each year the number of ships traversing the Northwest Passage rises, raising concerns among local and indigenous communities. As this program illustrates, the trend shows no sign of stopping, since what were once extremely dangerous waters are becoming more and more accessible to global commerce. Ports such as Churchill, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, and Murmansk, near Russia's border with Norway and Finland, expect to see business and maritime activity grow for years to come. But with the increases in traffic come higher risks-in particular for the Inuit, who have called the Arctic home for thousands of years and are troubled by escalating threats to their traditional way of life.
Online
2009
11.

Power Trip [electronic resource]: An American Energy Utility in Post-Soviet Georgia

In January of 1999, the American multinational known as AES purchased Telasi, an electricity distribution company, from the Georgian government. AES's goal: to establish a modern, U.S.-style power utility in Tbilisi, a city rife with violence and corruption. But less than five years later, AES sold Telasi to Russia's state-owned United Energy Systems, giving Russian interests further control over Georgia's energy supply. This award-winning documentary shows what happened in the interim-as AES managers and frustrated Georgians, from TV journalists to everyday citizens, struggled with new systems, practices, and policies amid urban chaos. A superb case study in the overlap between energy, economics, and social change. This edition has been slightly edited for classroom-friendly use.
Online
2004
12.

Modern Marvels [electronic resource]: Gasoline

Before the automobile paved the way for gasoline's rise, it was considered a bothersome byproduct of kerosene production. This episode goes far beyond the pump to document the complete story of gasoline, showing what it really is and how it is refined, transported, and used. Also considered is the future of fuel, when alternative sources like hydrogen fuel cells and biodiesel may eventually replace gas at the top of the power pyramid.
Online
2002
13.

Meet the Frackers [electronic resource]: Energy Independence or Environmental Nightmare?

Spreading out beneath the suburbs of Dallas, the underground deposit known as the Barnett Shale promises vast oil and gas riches. This program follows the efforts of Texas developers as they stampede for a piece of the action, even as local residents and environmental activists raise major objections. To liberate the bounty below calls for fracking-a controversial process in which huge quantities of water and chemicals are injected underground, shattering rock and releasing gas and oil. The film also examines other states where fracking is taking place, such as North Dakota, where farmer Jacki Schilke insists that frackers "are here to rape this land." Viewers are given a wide-ranging look at the pros and cons of what is touted as a major step toward America's independence from forei [...]
Online
2012
14.

Breaking the Wall of the Fossil Age [electronic resource]: How Desertec Can Overcome Energy Resource Limitations and Global Warming

Finding new sources of energy is a key challenge of our era, yet deserts have largely been overlooked. Considering the abundance of energy and lack of inhabitation, building solar thermal power plants in this vast space could generate electricity, which would then be transmitted to countries in Europe and Africa through high-voltage direct current transmission. Due to the high solar radiation in the Sahara, such plants could deliver 15 percent of electricity needs in Europe alone. This 2009 Falling Walls lecture video explores how one physicist works to make this revolutionary idea for carbon-free power generation a reality. Gerhard Knies initiated the Desertec Industrial Initiative, which aims to find sustainable power supply for all regions of the world with access to deserts. Dese [...]
Online
2009
15.

Revelations and Revolution [electronic resource]

Today we can hardly imagine life without electrical power - it defines our era. It creates human connections. It is the lifeblood of civil society. But how did we arrive here, at a place in which our understanding of electricity is matched, if not overwhelmed, by our dependence on it? Bringing the scientific history of electricity to a dramatic conclusion, this program describes how a new age dawned - how researchers discovered electric fields and electromagnetic waves. Viewers learn about the achievements of James Clerk Maxwell, Heinrich Hertz, Oliver Lodge, Jagadish Bose, William Crookes, Herbert Matare, Heinrich Welker, and others. The program also asks whether or not tomorrow might bring yet another breakthrough - because if we can understand the secret of electrical superconduct [...]
Online
2012
16.

Running on Lithium [electronic resource]: A New Way to Travel

This film introduces electric car pioneer John Wayland. "Once you've had a taste of electric power you never want to go back," he says; "it's nice to know that we are going down the road free from dependence on foreign oil." He adds proudly: "We run on American-generated electrons." His garage full of sleek lithium-powered electric cars is a far cry from the boxy electric cars of the 1980s. For John, the electric car is not only a thrilling ride into the future, it's also a fulfillment of the clean-air dream that was born in him as a five-year-old waving goodbye to the exhaust fumes of his parents.
Online
2010
17.

Spark [electronic resource]

Starting with Francis Hauksbee's 1705 Royal Society demonstration, in which he produced static electricity and a nascent form of neon lighting, this program looks at the origins of our understanding of electricity and how it could be harnessed. The film profiles many of the scientists and "natural philosophers" who first studied electricity, including Stephen Gray, Pieter van Musschenbroek, Luigi Galvani, and several others. Viewers learn about Benjamin Franklin's kite exploit, Henry Cavendish's investigations of the electric shock produced by the torpedo fish, and the development of the electric battery following Alessandro Volta's discovery involving a copper coin and a silver spoon. The program concludes with the first breakthrough in finding a commercial use for electricity: Hump [...]
Online
2012
18.

The Age of Invention [electronic resource]

Once a subject of crude experiments and parlor tricks, electricity was recognized some 200 years ago as a force that could completely transform the world - driving machines, lighting homes, and enabling us to communicate across continents. This program shows how scientists and engineers unlocked the power of electricity in an extraordinary century of innovation and invention. It profiles scientists who discovered the links between electricity and magnetism as well as other fundamental concepts - Hans Christian Oersted, Michael Faraday, William Sturgeon, Joseph Henry, and others. The development of commercial applications is discussed with segments on Samuel Morse, the story of the 1866 transatlantic cable, and the "war of currents" rivalry between Thomas Edison's DC and Nikola Tesla' [...]
Online
2012
19.

Breaking the Wall of Fusion [electronic resource]: How the ITER Project Aims for Limitless Energy

Imagine if life on Earth was not dependent on the Sun - if the Earth had its own sun, serving as a giant local energy plant. This video of a 2009 Falling Walls Conference lecture features physicist Norbert Holtkamp, internationally acclaimed expert in high-energy colliders and linear accelerators and principal deputy director-general of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, or ITER. This research and engineering project aims to translate today's studies of plasma physics into tomorrow's electricity-producing fusion plants. ITER addresses a key challenge that our civilization will have to face over the next decades: how to provide sufficient, clean energy in the context of diminishing fossil resources and increasing demand for energy. As "iter" means "the way" in Latin, the [...]
Online
2009
20.

Breaking the Wall of High-Level Nuclear Waste [electronic resource]: How Partitioning and Transmutation Can Help to Reduce the Radiotoxicity

The safe disposal and management of nuclear waste is a difficult issue. In this 2010 Falling Walls lecture video, Joachim Knebel, chief science officer 4 at KIT and spokesperson of the Helmholtz Programme Nuclear Safety Research, advocates developing an extended closed fuel cycle based on innovative partitioning and transmutation technologies, or P&T, to dramatically reduce the radiotoxicity of the high-level nuclear waste. Having authored more than 100 scientific publications and 55 invited papers at scientific conferences, public hearings, and specialist meetings in Europe, the United States, Japan, Russia, India, and South Korea, Knebel is one of the most respected voices in the field of transmutation research. As an alternative to direct disposal, or "open fuel cycle," Knebel rec [...]
Online
2010