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1.

Mother: Caring for 7 Billion

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"Mother, the film, breaks a 40-year taboo by bringing to light an issue that silently fuels our largest environmental, humanitarian and social crises - population growth. Since the 1960s the world population has nearly doubled, adding more than 3 billion people. At the same time, talking about population has become politically incorrect because of the sensitivity of the issues surrounding the topic- religion, economics, family planning, and gender inequality. The film illustrates both the over consumption and the inequity side of the population issue by following Beth, a mother, a child-rights activist, and the last sibling of a large American family of twelve, as she discovers the thorny complexities of the population dilemma and highlights a different path to solve it" -- IMDb website.
DVD
2013
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

What a Way to Go: Life at the End of Empire

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"A middle class white guy comes to grips with Peak Oil, Climate Change, Mass Extinction, Population Overshoot and the demise of the American lifestyle. ... Featuring interviews with Daniel Quinn, Derrick Jensen, Jerry Mander, Chellis Glendinning, Richard Heinberg, Thomas Berry, William Catton, Ran Prieur and Richard Manning, What a Way to Go looks at the current global situation and asks the most important questions of all: How did we get here? Why do we keep destroying the planet? What do we truly want? Can we find a vision that will empower us to do what is necessary to survive, and even thrive, in the coming decades?" -- Home page http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

World Population

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After a population decrease in the 14th century because of the bubonic plague, population growth began to surge around 1800 with the Industrial Revolution. During the 20th and 21st centuries growth has occurred and will continue to occur mainly in developing countries like Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Areas most likely to remain relatively unpopulated are comprised of desert, frozen tundra, swamps, and high rocky mountains.
VHS
1990
Ivy (By Request)
6.

The Human Race

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The four-part documentary series weighs the implications of the way we live together, the way we organize societies, and our complex relationship with the environment.
VHS
1994
Ivy (By Request)
8.

It Grows and Grows [electronic resource]

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In Program 18 examples ranging from money in the bank to fish in the sea are used to explicate population growth. The mathematics of determining harvesting rates to maintain sustainable yields is explained. Also emphasizes the importance of determining population size and related measures, concluding with an examination of demography and population pyramids.
Online
1986; 1987
9.

The Secret World [electronic resource]

The Tara Oceans research team came together to better understand the marine world, arguably the most important ecosystem on Earth. This program lays the groundwork for their three-year expedition, introducing the personnel, their on-board lab, and their mission-to learn more about plankton, and to gain insight into the health of the planet as a result. Viewers travel with the crew as they sail the western Mediterranean searching for plankton colonies and observing microscopic interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton. The team also maps out a plan to draw up a complete planktonic inventory.
Online
2010
10.

Man and the Oceans [electronic resource]

With no obvious predators to curb the population, humans are experiencing a growth in numbers that stands outside the laws of nature. What role does man play in the decreasing biodiversity of the earth, and of marine life in particular? In this program, the Tara Oceans researchers go to the Indian Ocean to investigate human influence on the health of the seas. Around the Austral Islands, the team finds copepods are being attacked by viruses, leading to speculation about the role of viruses in a balanced ecology. Sailing on, they encounter former fishing zones overrun by jellyfish and areas of damaged coral-troubling signs of rising oceanic temperatures.
Online
2010
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Jonas Eliasson - How to Solve Traffic Jams

It's an unfortunate reality in nearly every major city: road congestion, especially during rush hours. In this TEDTalk, transportation specialist Jonas Eliasson reveals how subtly nudging just a small percentage of drivers to stay off major roads can make traffic jams a thing of the past.
Online
2012
12.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Bobby Ghosh - Why Global Jihad Is Losing

Throughout the history of Islam, says journalist Bobby Ghosh, there have been two sides to jihad: one internal - a personal struggle to be better - and the other external. A small minority (most recently, Osama bin Laden) has appropriated the second, using it as an excuse for deadly global violence against "the West." In this TEDTalk, Ghosh suggests that now that bin Laden's worldwide organization has fragmented, it's time to reclaim the word.
Online
2012
13.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Paul Gilding - the Earth Is Full

Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Writer/activist Paul Gilding suggests that we have - and the possibility of devastating consequences - in a TEDTalk that's equal parts terrifying and, oddly, hopeful.
Online
2012
14.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Hans Rosling - Religions and Babies

Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others? And if so, how does this affect global population growth? Speaking at the TEDxSummit in Doha, Qatar, data visionary Hans Rosling graphs data over time and across religions to reach - with his trademark humor and sharp insight - a surprising conclusion on world fertility rates.
Online
2012
15.

The Future of Animal Care [electronic resource]

Human beings love their pets. Some people would spare no expense when it comes to health care for the animals in their lives; in fact, some animals are better cared for than humans. This film explores the advances made in the technology of animal health. Since they reflect human society, there has been an increase in the number of animals suffering from obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Modern technology has brought about new treatments for these diseases in animals just as in humans.
Online
2005
16.

The Mountain Barrier [electronic resource]

Rising to heights of 13,000 feet, the Sarawat Mountains of Western Arabia extend for 1,000 miles along the entire length of the Red Sea, and are home to numerous species of wildlife. High juniper forests, fed by moisture rising from the Red Sea, support large troops of Hamadryas baboons, and exotic African birds such as the hornbill, Abyssinian roller, and thirteen other bird species found nowhere else in the world. The abandoned mountain village of al-Fawqa has become home to fruit bats, sunbirds, and weaver birds. In the vast volcanic moonscape that exists behind the mountain wall, spring growth provides a nursery for millions of migrating birds.
Online
1990
17.

Atacama [electronic resource]

The Atacama Desert in Chile is commonly known as the driest place on Earth. Studies by a group of British scientists have suggested that some riverbeds have been dry for 120,000 years. Once known for its rich deposits of copper and the world's largest natural supply of sodium nitrate, the desert is now home to the largest space observatory every built by man. Because of its high altitude, nearly non-existent cloud cover, dry air, and lack of light pollution and radio interference from the very widely spaced cities, the desert is one of the best places in the world to conduct astronomical observations.
Online
2011
18.

Thar [electronic resource]

The Thar - or Great Indian - Desert is the most densely populated desert in the world and has been inhabited for thousands of years. Huge windblown seas of sand dominate the desert with some dunes reaching close to 500 feet in height. Extreme temperature shifts, from near freezing to more than 120 degrees, make life difficult for all who call the Thar home.
Online
2011
19.

Globesity [electronic resource]: Fat's New Frontier

Not so long ago, countries like Mexico, India, and China counted malnutrition as a major health concern. Today, hundreds of millions of people in these countries are coping with obesity and its associated diseases, growing fatter, and at a faster rate, than Americans. This program explores the shocking explosion of global obesity and examines its links to increasing wealth and changing diets. The video travels to Mexico, where two-thirds of the population is overweight due to the popularity of soft drinks; to Brazil, where cheap, highly processed foods are found in even the most remote areas; to India, where a combination of better wages and genetic predisposition has experts predicting a diabetes epidemic; and to China, where a new middle class consumes more sugar and fat, and far m [...]
Online
2012
20.

Education, Education [electronic resource]: What Does an Education Get You?

When the Chinese government privatized universities in 1997 education became a commodity, with some institutions charging the equivalent of 60 years of income in exchange for a college degree. And while many saw the steep cost as a good investment, the system now produces more than 2 million graduates every year who join the "ant tribe" - a battalion of recent grads unable to find work. This program examines trends in Chinese education that leave young people barred from good employment opportunities, or hopelessly in debt, making schooling a cause of poverty instead of a way out of it.
Online
2012