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Political Participation — United States
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1.

Howard Zinn: You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train : A Documentary

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Documents the life and times of the historian, activist and author of the best selling classic "A People's History of the United States." Features archival materials, interviews with Zinn as well as colleagues and friends including Noam Chomsky, Marian Wright Edelman, Daniel Ellsberg, Tom Hayden and Alice Walker.; Documentary on historian and activist Howard Zinn.
DVD
2004
2.

MoveOn: The Movie

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Feature-length documentary focusing on the revolutionary history of the biggest progressive grass-roots movement seen in the United States since the 1960s. This film stands as a vivid testimony to times of radical social change in our nation and to the power of people banding together for change.
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Slacker Uprising

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"Traces Michael Moore's 62-city tour of the swing states during the 2004 Presidential election ... Moore's goal was to convince millions of non-voting 'slackers' - mostly between the ages of 18-29 - to give voting a try" -- Container.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Political Parties [electronic resource]: Mobilizing Agents

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Explains how political parties perform important functions that link the public to the institutions of American government. Parties create coalitions of citizens who share political goals, elect candidates to public office to achieve those goals, and organize the legislative and executive branches of government. Examples include the political advancement of Cindy Montañez, Mayor of the city of San Fernando; the 1993 mayorial race in New York City as a revelation of the differences between Democrats and Republican, and how Senator Jim Jefford's 1991 decision to change his allegiance shifted the balance of power in the Congress and directly influenced the investigation of Enron.
Online
2003
5.

Elections [electronic resource]: The Maintenance of Democracy

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Explores the crucial role of strategy in the two-stage electoral campaign system; the opportunities for citizens to choose, organize, and elect candidates who will pursue policies they favor and the need for campaigns to increase voter turnout by educating citizens about the importance and influence of their vote. Examples include campaign initiatives to elect Kennedy in spite of the fact that he was a Catholic; grassroots political activism in Montgomery County, Maryland, and the 1990's campaign by rock musicians to enourage young people to vote and sway opinions on music censorship issues.
Online
2003
6.

Interest Groups [electronic resource]: Organizing to Influence

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Shows how America's large number of corporate, citizen-action, and grass-roots interest groups enhance our representative process by giving citizens a role in shaping policy agendas. Examples include the controversy and lobbying over the "Crusader" weapsons system; the opposition of the National Campaign for Jobs and Income Support to the proposed 2002 changes to the Welfare Bill, and citizen action that prevented highways from being built through the center of South Pasadena, California.
Online
2003
7.

Howard Zinn [electronic resource]: You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train

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This acclaimed film looks at the amazing life of the renowned historian, activist and author. Following his early days as a shipyard labor organizer and bombardier in World War II, Zinn became an academic rebel and leader of civil disobedience in a time of institutionalized racism and war. His influential writings shine light on and bring voice to factory workers, immigrant laborers, African Americans, Native Americans and the working poor. Featuring rare archival materials and interviews with Zinn and colleagues such as Noam Chomsky, You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train captures the essence of this extraordinary man who has been a catalyst for progressive change for more than 60 years.
Online
2011
8.

Secret History of the Credit Card [electronic resource]

The average American family today carries 10 credit cards. With credit card debt and personal bankruptcies now at an all time high, this episode of Frontline examines how the credit card industry became so pervasive, so lucrative, and so powerful. The program investigates why there were no legal limits on the amount of interest or fees that can be charged and how credit cards have become the most profitable sector of the American banking industry, with more than
Online
2004
9.

By the People [electronic resource]: Democracy in the Wild

This film offers an unprecedented insider's look as events unfolded over the 11 days preceding the 2004 presidential election, By The People: Democracy In The Wild reveals who and what it takes to put on an American election. This behind-the-scenes documentary follows average Americans as they race to get the polls open on Election Day. After witnessing their struggle to uphold the most basic aspect of democracy, viewers will never again take the right to vote for granted.
Online
2005
10.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Kathleen Hall Jamieson on Political Advertising

Amidst the mudslinging, campaign promises, and scare tactics, what is really being said in those highly produced political ads? In this program, Bill Moyers talks with one of America's leading political and media analysts, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School of Communication and author of Everything You Think You Know About Politics. And Why You're Wrong. Through astute analysis, Jamieson deconstructs more than a dozen TV commercials used by politicians and public interest groups, homing in on their visual and rhetorical methods to expose their actual agendas of issue advocacy. Together, Jamieson and Moyers discuss the significance of these ads in the contexts of future elections and American politics in general.
Online
2005; 2003
11.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Daniel Yankelovich on Public Opinion Research

Opinion polls are said to be the voice of America; Daniel Yankelovich has been listening for the last 40 years. In this program, Bill Moyers talks with the survey pioneer recently named one of the 20th century's ten most influential people in the area of public policy. From his vast experience in the field, Yankelovich explains the agendas behind public opinion research, homing in on its uses and abuses by special interest groups. He also discusses the integral link between the economy and education, as well as what Americans can do to become poll savvy.
Online
2006; 2003
12.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: John Nichols and Robert McChesney on the Media and Democracy

In this program, media experts John Nichols and Robert McChesney join Bill Moyers to examine America's corporate media machine and the dire implications of closed-door deregulatory decisions. Nichols, Washington correspondent for The Nation, and McChesney, author of Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times, discuss, among other topics, the pernicious influence of corporate interests on the free press, which they contend have become a major barrier to the exercise of democracy.
Online
2005; 2003
13.

War Spin [electronic resource]: Media and Iraq War

Some stories are simply too good to be true. In this program, John Kampfner, political editor for the New Statesman (London), skewers heroic reports of the ambush, capture, and rescue of Private Jessica Lynch, calling them misrepresentations designed to bolster wavering support for the Iraq War. Kampfner also scrutinizes the controversial practice of embedding members of the news media in military units and questions the sincerity and overall informational value of the daily CentCom briefings in Doha. An ideal springboard for discussions about propaganda, media ethics, and journalism in the modern combat zone.
Online
2005; 2003
14.

[electronic resource]: Justice and Reparation in California's Legal System

In 1991, Rick Walker was wrongly convicted of murder and spent the next 12 years in prison. This program tells the story of his exoneration and the political struggle to secure financial compensation for him from the state of California. In addition to an interview with Walker himself, the film presents detailed conversations with key players in his case and the partisan budget battle over reimbursing him. Interviewees include Alison Tucher, the lawyer who proved Walker's innocence; George Kennedy, the Santa Clara County District Attorney at the time; and Joe Simitian, the state assemblyman who fought to pass the bill that gave Walker
Online
2009
15.

Minds That Matter [electronic resource]: John Lewis

No one grasps the connections between social activism, electoral politics, and racial issues better than Congressman John Lewis (D-GA), perhaps the most prominent living veteran of the American civil rights movement. In 2007, he received the Robert J. Dole Leadership Prize from the University of Kansas and, in conjunction with the award, granted this in-depth interview before a live audience. Rep. Lewis discusses an epic range of topics, including his childhood in segregated Alabama; his first meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; the back-stage dilemma over his speech at the finale of the March on Washington; his role in the attempted march from Selma to Montgomery; the ongoing need for social activism today; and more.
Online
2009; 2008
16.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Jonathan Haidt, the Real Difference Between Liberals and Conservatives

Jonathan Haidt studies how and why we evolved to be moral. By understanding more about our moral roots, his hope is that we can learn to be tolerant of those whose morals don't match ours, but who are equally good and moral people on their own terms. In this TEDTalk, Haidt explores five moral precepts that form the basis of our value systems, whether we're left, right, or center. However, he also pinpoints the differing values that liberals and conservatives tend to honor most.
Online
2008
17.

The Truth About Lies [electronic resource]

The public mind is often deceived by those who manipulate it, and it deceives itself, as well. This program examines how deception has influenced some of the major events of our recent past and how self-deception shapes our personal lives and the public mind. Why do trusted people in public life lie to us and to themselves? Can a society die from too many lies? Do our institutions demand loyalty at the expense of the truth? The program explores such events as Watergate, the war in Vietnam, and the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, and reveals the pressures that led to the denial of truth and the distortion of reality. Among those interviewed are John Dean, former counsel to President Nixon, and Roger Boisjoly, a Morton Thiokol engineer who tried to postpone the launch of the [...]
Online
2006; 1988
18.

The Unelected [electronic resource]: Media

In an environment increasingly dominated by network ratings and tabloid-driven stories, the line between journalism and entertainment is blurred. In this program, correspondent Hedrick Smith goes behind the hype and the headlines to show how the media affect the national agenda and the standards of political debate. Network personalities Peter Jennings, Dan Rather, Brit Hume, and Eric Engberg; former Washington Post reporters Paul Taylor and Richard Harwood; and others address topics such as the Clinton/Flowers story, a case study of news coverage gone out of control; the negative dynamic between the White House Press Corps and the President; and how increased competition from tabloids, talk shows, and cable TV is changing the mainstream media.
Online
2005; 1996
19.

The Unelected [electronic resource]: Lobbies

In America, a shadow government wields incredible influence over what gets done inside the Beltway-and who reaps the benefits. In this program, correspondent Hedrick Smith spotlights the powerful influence of the nation's special interest lobbies during the Clinton years. Majority Whip Tom DeLay; Charles Blixt, of R. J. Reynolds; Mike Pertschuk, of the Advocacy Institute; members of Congress; lobbyists; and others scrutinize how UPS paralyzed OSHA's efforts to improve worker safety and how the medical insurance lobby's "Harry and Louise" ads helped sink the Clinton healthcare reform bill. In-depth reporting reveals the stealth tactics used by the tobacco industry in its ongoing fight against federal legislation.
Online
2005; 1996
20.

Voting [electronic resource]: Right and Responsibility

Why should I vote? Does my vote count? This program addresses these questions and reinforces the importance of voting to the political process. The program begins with a history of voting, and the struggles of women and African Americans to gain voting rights. It then offers examples of close elections. Students are encouraged to consider how history might have been changed if the outcomes had been different. Instructions on how to vote, how to register, absentee voting, and how to use a voting machine are presented. Both primary and general elections are discussed on the local, state, and national levels, as well as referendums and votes on constitutional amendments. Students learn how to critically evaluate candidates based on their positions, experience, and other factors.
Online
2005; 1996