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Political Activists — United States — History — 20th Century
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1.

Amendment 23 [electronic resource]: D.C. Voting

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
2.

Amendment 26 [electronic resource]: Voting for 18-Year-Olds

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
3.

Amendments 15 and 24 [electronic resource]: Rights of Citizens to Vote/Poll Tax

The U.S. Constitution is the world's oldest written charter of government in continuous effect. Much of the success of this document can be attributed to the way the Constitution has changed to meet the needs of the American people. The framers of the Constitution wisely anticipated the need to make changes to the Constitution as the world itself changed. Between 1787, when the Constitution was written, and the present time, thousands of proposed amendments have been introduced in Congress. But in that time, only 27 of those proposed amendments have been ratified. These 27 amendments tell some of the most important stories in American political, social, and cultural history. They tell the story of the founding principles of the American nation, and how that nation has changed. This c [...]
Online
2007; 1998
4.

444 Days [electronic resource]: Iran Hostage Crisis

In the words of the U.S. Embassy Communications Officer, being held hostage "was like being raped. Drawing on archival footage-including previously unreleased film from Iran-and candid interviews with the American hostages and their Iranian captors, this riveting program presents a balanced look at the harrowing details of the 14-month standoff that brought radical Islam to world prominence and forever altered America's attitude towards the Middle East. Additional interviews with religious leaders, top-level politicians, military personnel, and others flesh out a story of uncertainty, frustration, and hardship for all involved, which was only resolved with the belated release of the hostages in 1981.
Online
2007; 1998
5.

France-America's Friend? [electronic resource]: The de Gaulle Years

The war in Iraq is not the first time that the U.S. has been at loggerheads with its mercurial ally France. This program presents a vivid account of an earlier troubled phase in Franco-American relations: the critical years from 1961 to 1969. Drawing on recently declassified archival materials as well as on eyewitness accounts from the advisors, colleagues, and ministers of Charles de Gaulle, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, the program depicts JFK's historical visit to France, his discovery of a famously difficult ally in de Gaulle, and the ambiguous relationship that developed between the two countries in the years to come.
Online
2006; 2001
6.

The Second American Revolution: Part 2 [electronic resource]

The year 1954 can now be seen as a clarifying point of convergence in American history. Among other things, it was the year that brought the Supreme Court's decision to outlaw racial segregation in the schools of the United States. In this program, Bill Moyers, Ossie Davis, and Ruby Dee tell the story of how the New Deal, World War II, and postwar social changes set the stage for a long-awaited and hard-fought legal assault on the fortresses of segregation. The video also shows how the victory of 1954 sparked a decade of continuing nonviolent revolution that culminated in the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Online
2010; 1984
7.

Presidents and Politics With Richard Strout [electronic resource]

This Bill Moyers program features news correspondent Richard Strout, who covered Washington and the White House from 1925 to his retirement in 1984. Strout's reports, filed for the Christian Science Monitor and The New Republic, are studied here not only as chronicles of American history but as milestones circumscribing our nation's capital-and its evolution from a "small town" to the nerve center of the free world. Strout speaks with Bill Moyers about presidents from Coolidge to Reagan, about Congressional lions, about mighty visitors like Winston Churchill, and about breath-taking speeches like Lyndon Johnson's impassioned plea for the Civil Rights Act.
Online
2010; 1984
8.

Change, Change [electronic resource]

As this Bill Moyers program makes clear, television became another member of the family in the 1960s, both reflecting and influencing the era. The times were chaotic and TV whirled us into that chaos while also holding up a mirror to it: the assassination and funeral of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Apollo moon landing, the saga of the Civil Rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr. So swiftly was change upon us in the decade of the 60s, so swiftly did the landmarks pass, that all these years later it seems a ride through great upheaval and great promise-some of which was realized and some of which was impossible to fulfill.
Online
2010; 1984
9.

History's Mysteries [electronic resource]: The Greensboro Massacre

This episode of History's Mysteries exposes the gripping, inside account of one of the most shocking crimes in modern American history: the Greensboro Massacre. On November 3, 1979, members of the Communist Worker's Party held a Death to the Klan rally in Greensboro, North Carolina. A caravan of Ku Klux Klansmen and American Nazis drove into the center of the protesters. Screamed insults from both sides escalated into physical confrontation. The Klansmen and Nazis removed an arsenal of weapons from their cars and began firing into the terrified crowd, killing five and wounding eleven.
Online
2011; 2000
10.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1962

James Meredith becomes the first African-American to attend the University of Mississippi. This episode of Year by Year: 1962 also looks at John Glenn's orbiting of the earth.
Online
2011; 1996
11.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1963

Year by Year looks back at 1963, John F. Kennedy's assassination, and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famed 'I Have a Dream' speech.
Online
2011; 1996
12.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1964

Lyndon Baines Johnson, LBJ, becomes the 36th President of the United States. Year by Year: 1964 also documents widespread Beatlemania as the Beatles tour the U.S.
Online
2011; 1996
13.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1965

Details the three historic Selma to Montgomery marches in Alabama in support of civil rights.
Online
2011; 1996
14.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1966

Eugene Cernan, Gemini 9A pilot, takes a two-hour walk in space, the longest to date. This episode of Year by Year also looks at the Vietnam War.
Online
2011; 1996
15.

Year by Year [electronic resource]: 1967

Follows as three astronauts die during the Apollo space mission disaster.
Online
2011; 1996
16.

Superpower [electronic resource]

America's efforts invigorated the struggle against the Nazi stranglehold in Europe. In the Pacific, the ultimate piece of technology ended the war, and a new superpower took the global stage. In this program, many of America's most prominent leaders and personalities reflect on defining moments in the evolution of post-war America-including the Cold War, the space race, the Civil Rights movement, and more.
Online
2011; 2010
17.

Millennium [electronic resource]

The Cold War turns hot in Viet Nam... a burglary at the Watergate Hotel becomes a national crisis... a space shuttle ascent erupts in tragedy... these are a few of the momentous events examined in this program. The 9/11 attacks and the election of President Barack Obama are discussed, along with the technological forces that drove America toward the 21st century: television, the credit card, personal computers, and more.
Online
2010
18.

Marching to Freedom Land [electronic resource]

The 1960s bring new progress in the quest for freedom, but this is also an explosive decade that threatens to tear apart the fabric of society. President Kennedy is assassinated, and Lyndon B. Johnson pursues the war in Vietnam. Martin Luther King, Jr. is assassinated, leaving behind an impressive and growing legacy of non-violent civil rights resistance.
Online
2002
19.

Becoming Free [electronic resource]

America continues to make tremendous strides through the prosperity of the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new millennium. The nation's mettle is severely tested by the tragedy of September 11, 2001, but the people of the United States rally together. New York City comes to stand as a symbol of American diversity.
Online
2002
20.

Cuban Missile Crisis [electronic resource]: An Exploration Through Archival Film

Compiled by author, teacher, and curriculum advisor Ben Walsh, this program features 11 extracts on the Cuban missile crisis from various film archive sources. Clip selections and Walsh's commentary are organized around the following three topics: the build-up to the crisis, the actions and decisions of President John F. Kennedy in confronting the threat, and the outcome of the conflict in geopolitical terms. Specific film sources include One Week in October, a 1964 Defense Department documentary; Duck and Cover, a public information film from 1951; President Kennedy's address to the nation televised on October 22, 1962; Cuban Crisis, a newsreel from 1962; and Blockade Lifted, a newsreel from 1962.
Online
2006