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81.

Will There Ever Be an Apocalypse?

An interview with Matt Stanley, a professor of history and philosophy of science at NYU on his recent talk titled From Physics to Prophecy: Learning to Predict the Scientific Apocalypse.
Online
2018; 2017
82.

The Amazing World of Gravity: Part 2

The second episode will show how gravity varies across the Earth’s surface. A travelling Gravity Roadshow of scientists and volunteers will cross the UK, measuring gravity using highly accurate scales as they go, to see how the force of gravity varies across the UK. This will allow us to reveal in the show the place in Britain where, according to the laws of physics, you weigh the least.
Online
2017; 2016
83.

NOVA: Why Ships Sink

Picking up from the Costa Concordia disaster and looking both back to the Titanic disaster a century ago, and into the future of sea travel, NOVA looks at questions about cruise ship safety and the science of the ships' buoyancy.
Online
2018; 2012
84.

Using Sound

Dr. Helen Czerski examines the extraordinary messages sound waves carry and how they help us understand the world around us. Visiting a hidden location buried beneath the hills of Scotland, Helen experiences some of the most extreme acoustics in the world. She discovers how sound has driven the evolution of biological systems and complex relationships between creatures that exploit sound. Through the story of a cochlea implant patient, Helen explores the complicated way our ears can translate sound waves. On the North Sea, she investigates how marine archaeologists use sound waves to uncover human stories buried beneath the sea.
Online
2017
85.

Shedding Light on Motion: Episode 6—Newton's First Law

In episode six of the Shedding Light on Motion series, presenter Spiro Liacos is “thrown forward” in a head-on collision, “thrown backwards” when his tram takes off, and “thrown to the side” when his car suddenly turns a corner. But in fact none of these things actually happen! Using brilliant visuals, this episode looks at the fact that an object will remain stationary or move with a constant velocity unless a force acts on it. It also describes a number of different forces that affect our lives daily.
Online
2017
86.

Seth Macfarlane

Host Neil deGrasse Tyson features his interview with Seth MacFarlane, creator of the popular animated series Family Guy. Comedian co-host Chuck Nice and astrophysicist Charles Liu join Tyson in the Hall of the Universe to discuss the science of Family Guy, social issues in cartoons, and the science fiction parodies abound in the series.
Online
2017; 2015
87.

Energy on the Edge

Everything that we do to move, live, work, play, create, and survive, is sustained by spinning a wheel. Whether engines in our cars, or whirling turbines generators in a power plant, spinning the wheels of civilization requires fuel. We've long relied on fossil fuels, but the supply is finite and the environmental costs of burning them are growing. Enter a new generation of inventors, innovators, and entrepreneurs who are looking to the edge of discovery for new ways to keep these wheels in motion. There is enough energy trapped inside a single glass of water to power a major metropolitan city for a day, and experimental physicists believe they're close to unlocking it. In the sun drenched deserts of Nevada, clean energy pioneers are building a billion-dollar experimental plant that [...]
Online
2017; 2015
88.

Weird Science—Magnetic Flip? The Science Squad

Have you ever felt like your world has been turned upside down? You could be more correct than you know…
Online
2017; 2015
89.

Heard Island Test and Climate Change, the

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through sound in a test done near Heard Island, an area considered unique because sound emanating from that point can theoretically reach every ocean basin on Earth.
Online
2015; 2011
90.

Using Sound to Measure Ocean Warming

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through the use of sound--a process known as dark acoustic thermometry. Professor Munk notes that since the speed of sound increases in the ocean with temperature, the time it takes for a pulse to cross a body of water should diminish as the water gets warmer.
Online
2015; 2011
91.

Rocket Scientist Franklin Chang-Diaz

This episode of NOVA scienceNOW introduces renowned paleontologist George Poinar, whose study of extinct creatures preserved in amber partly inspired Jurassic Park; examines the northern lights and “space weather;” studies mice that Ron Evans and his team genetically altered for heightened endurance; and profiles Franklin Chang-Diaz, designer of a revolutionary new rocket that could power a new generation of space explorers.
Online
2017; 2009
92.

Superconductors -- Powering Our Future

A maglev train hovers above its track. A doctor uses an MRI scanner to detect disease. Fast digital circuits send superfast, clear signals from one source to another. These technologies are possible thanks to superconductors. Superconductors are materials where electrons can move without any resistance. But today's superconductors don’t work unless they are cooled to well below room temperature. Now researchers are using quantum physics on a quest to find superconductors that will work at room temperature to make them easier to use
Online
2017
93.

Shedding Light on Motion: Episode 7—Newton's Second Law

In episode seven of the Shedding Light on Motion series, we answer the most important question that has ever been asked: how does a magician pull a tablecloth out from under a dinner set? No, seriously, we look at the so simple and yet so powerful equation F = ma. Newton’s Second Law tells us how to calculate the amount of force required to accelerate something by a given amount.
Online
2017
94.

Marine Animals and Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the use of sound by marine animals. Professor Monk observes that while scientists don't fully understand all the ways marine animals use sound, it is generally believed that animals in the marine environment probably use sound to search for food and mates, as well during the navigation process.
Online
2015; 2011
95.

TEDTalks: David Brenner—A New Weapon in the Fight Against Superbugs

Since the widespread use of antibiotics began in the 1940s, we've tried to develop new drugs faster than bacteria can evolve—but this strategy isn't working. Drug-resistant bacteria known as superbugs killed nearly 700,000 people last year, and by 2050 that number could be 10 million—more than cancer kills each year. Can physics help? In a talk from the frontiers of science, radiation scientist David Brenner shares his work studying a potentially life-saving weapon: a wavelength of ultraviolet light known as far-UVC, which can kill superbugs safely, without penetrating our skin. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson.
Online
2018; 2017
96.

TEDTalks: Vikram Sharma—How Quantum Physics Can Make Encryption Stronger

As quantum computing matures, it's going to bring unimaginable increases in computational power along with it—and the systems we use to protect our data (and our democratic processes) will become even more vulnerable. But there's still time to plan against the impending data apocalypse, says encryption expert Vikram Sharma. Learn more about how he's fighting quantum with quantum: designing security devices and programs that use the power of quantum physics to defend against the most sophisticated attacks.
Online
2018
97.

Shedding Light on Motion: Episode 8—Newton's Third Law

In episode eight of the Shedding Light on Motion series, we look at that most poetic of all Laws. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. How does a rocket engine work? Why do guns recoil when fired? How do our muscles work? What propels us when we’re swimming? And how exactly is gravity a two-way interaction? All these questions, and many more, are answered in this excellent video.
Online
2017
98.

TEDTalks: George Tulevski—The Next Step in Nanotechnology

Nearly every other year the transistors that power silicon computer chip shrink in size by half and double in performance, enabling our devices to become more mobile and accessible. But what happens when these components can't get any smaller? George Tulevski researches the unseen and untapped world of nanomaterials. His current work: developing chemical processes to compel billions of carbon nanotubes to assemble themselves into the patterns needed to build circuits, much the same way natural organisms build intricate, diverse and elegant structures. Could they hold the secret to the next generation of computing?
Online
2018; 2017
99.

Temperature and the Velocity of Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the relationship between temperature and the velocity of sound, observing that velocity increases with temperature. Because temperature generally increases anywhere from ten to twenty degrees moving up from one kilometer to the surface, so, too, does the speed of sound generally increase closer to the surface.
Online
2015; 2011
100.

Global Warming and Sea Level Change

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the relationship between global warming and sea level change. Professor Munk points out that, contrary to popular belief, the melting of floating ice does not change sea level. It is the melting of land-based ice masses that contributes to a rise in sea level.
Online
2015; 2011