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21.

Nuclear Radiation [electronic resource]

This program take a thorough look at nuclear radiation, covering the history of its discovery, what makes atoms radioactive, and methods for detecting radioactivity. The video also explains types of radiation including alpha, beta, gamma, and positron, types of decay and decay equations, decay series, radiation dose, and dose equivalence. The effects of radiation on living things and the environment, and the uses of radiation in medicine and industry are also discussed, with application to real-life situations.
Online
2012
22.

Beauty and Truth in Physics [electronic resource]

In addition to being a Nobel laureate, Murray Gell-Mann is an accomplished physicist who's earned numerous awards, medals, and honorary degrees for his work with subatomic particles, including the groundbreaking theory that the nucleus of an atom comprises 100 or so fundamental building blocks called quarks. Dubbed "the man with five brains," he now heads the evolution of human languages program at the Santa Fe Institute, which he cofounded in 1984. In this TEDTalk, he is armed with a sense of humor and laypeople's terms and he addresses whether or not elegant equations are more likely to right than inelegant ones. "The names alone that Gell-Mann applies to his new theories and formulations reflect his sense of humor, immensely broad range of interests, and deep understanding. The th [...]
Online
2007
23.

The Pleasure of Finding Things Out [electronic resource]

Richard Feynman (1918-1988) was an outstanding scientist, Nobel laureate, and legendary teacher. A graduate of M.I.T. with a doctorate from Princeton University, Dr. Feynman soon acquired a reputation as a theoretical physicist and sought-after lecturer in leading universities. During World War II he worked on the development of the atomic bomb and became head of the theoretical division at Los Alamos. In this program, he talks about his lifelong obsession with finding out how the world works-a passion for knowledge and understanding that began on childhood walks with his father. He was a remarkable man who speaks about science and scientists with a rare degree of honesty, insight, humor, and irreverence.
Online
1981
24.

Flight [electronic resource]

As early as the 1500s, we were dreaming of flight - that's when Leonardo da Vinci tried to build his flying machine. Unfortunately, his "Ornithopter" didn't work, and indeed, the airplanes of today do not have flapping wings! This program charts the history of manned flight - from the kite made by the now-famous Wright brothers, which became the forerunner of the flying machine, to today's commercial planes that can top 800 kmph. What is it that makes our current planes fly 12 times faster? Advances in aviation led to the Airbus A380, the largest passenger plane in the world, as well as to the scramjet built by NASA. So what will be the next quirky discovery for flight?
Online
2011
25.

The Elegant Universe [electronic resource]: Welcome to the 11th Dimension

String theory calls for at least ten dimensions in order for its rather abstruse mathematics to remain consistent. However, in 1995, Edward Witten of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, revolutionized string theory by successfully uniting the five different versions into a single theory, cryptically named "M-theory". It was a development requiring a total of eleven dimensions. In this program, we explore how this new dimension is different from all the others, as it implies that strings can come in higher dimensional shapes called membranes, or "branes" for short. Having truly science-fiction-like qualities, branes can be as large as the universe - or even present as a parallel universe - one we may be living on one right now. It is one of the most startling views at our existe [...]
Online
2003
26.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Geoffrey West - the Surprising Math of Cities and Corporations

Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities - that wealth, crime rate, walking speed, and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations.
Online
2011
27.

Breaking the Wall of Quantum Weirdness [electronic resource]: How Experiments Reveal Photon Schizophrenia

The concepts of quantum physics are outrageously counterintuitive. How is it possible that an event happening at one location affects an event at another without any obvious connection? This video from the 2009 Falling Walls Conference features a lecture from Alain Aspect, who calls this the weirdness of quantum physics, a field he has revolutionized in the past 30 years. While working toward his Ph.D. at the Institut d'Optique in Orsay, he launched his Bell inequalities test experiments, discovering that particles are able to instantaneously keep contact with each other regardless of the distance separating them. Settling a 70-year-old dispute between Bohr and Einstein is only one of the numerous achievements of this recipient of the CNRS Gold Medal. The results of his experiments m [...]
Online
2009
28.

Breaking the Wall of the Beginning of Time [electronic resource]: How Cosmology Will Tell Us What Happened Before the Big Bang

What happened at the beginning of the universe? Was the big bang the real origin? Is our universe unique? Are its basic features determined by mathematical laws or historical accidents? What does its future look like? Is it a one-off event or does it evolve through cycles? In this video from the 2011 Falling Walls Conference, hear Jean-Luc Lehners lecture on the relatively new field of string cosmology, which tackles these kinds of seminal questions about our universe. His research team at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics is studying and developing cosmological theories, such as inflationary cosmology and the theory of the cyclic universe, within the context of string theory. If successful, this new frame of research will provide a unified description of nature and [...]
Online
2011
29.

Atom Smasher Season 2 [electronic resource]: World's Toughest Fixes

You don't want to miss master rigger Sean Riley's biggest fix ever! Check out this incredible machine measuring 17 miles around - and worth seven billion dollars. The Large Hadron Collider is the largest atom-smasher built in history: a colossal scientific instrument buried 300 feet underground, spanning two countries and designed to recreate conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang for groundbreaking research. This remarkable machine could be our key to unlocking the secrets of the universe except for one tiny thing: it's broken. Nine months ago the world watched in horror as this mother of all atom-smashers almost self-destructed. Now Riley has an exclusive inside view: repairing the final critical component of the Large Hadron Collider and restarting the greatest scie [...]
Online
2009
30.

Breaking the Wall of Traditional Electronics [electronic resource]: How Embracing Disorder in Nanotechnology May Lead to Quantum Machines

While many today are barely keeping up with all the latest digital marvels, others are focused on finding ways to reinvent computing altogether - such as through recent efforts to engineer "quantum machines." The quantum mechanical nature of matter at the atomic scale may not only allow us to build information technologies with unprecedented levels of computational power, but may also lead us to discover and develop new ways of embracing the defects and disorder that nature has made common at the nanoscale. David Awschalom - an award-winning, experimental physicist in semiconductor spintronics at the University of California, Santa Barbara - is working with his team to make quantum machines a reality, by mobilizing atomic-scale defects in diamonds and diamond-like materials to store [...]
Online
2012
31.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Boaz Almog - "Levitating" a Superconductor

How can a super-thin three-inch disk levitate something 70,000 times its own weight? In this riveting TEDTalk, Boaz Almog demonstrates how a phenomenon known as quantum locking allows a superconductor disk to float over a magnetic rail - completely frictionlessly and with zero energy loss.
Online
2012
32.

Hunt for the Higgs [electronic resource]

This program goes behind the scenes at CERN to follow one of the most ambitious scientific quests of all time: the mission to find the elusive Higgs boson, aka the God particle. The particle is believed to give mass to everything in existence, making it part of a much grander inquiry into how the universe works. Hosted by theoretical physicist Jim Al-Khalili, the video features insights from enthusiastic scientists - including Michio Kaku and supersymmetry pioneer S. James Gates - who are deeply involved with the search.
Online
2012
33.

Mass and Moles [electronic resource]

Locked up in a vault at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures lies what may be the most important lump of metal in the world. The "master kilogram"-or Le Grand K-was created in the 19th century and is still used as the standard on which every other weight is based. But there is a problem with Le Grand K: what should be its unwavering weight has been changing over time. In this program, Marcus du Sautoy charts the history of the measurement of mass, touching on Newton's contributions, the adoption of the metric system, and the mole, then examines efforts by American and German scientists to redefine mass using a universal constant.
Online
2011
34.

Light, Heat, and Electricity [electronic resource]

Because we are able to measure energy, satellites in space can take the temperature of oceans and calculate the thickness of sea ice to within a millimeter's worth of accuracy. The ability to quantify heat, light, and electricity has transformed our lives, but how did we learn to measure these seeming intangibles with such precision? From lightning bolts and Watt engines to electromagnetic waves and single electrons, this program explores the measurement of light, heat, and electricity. The video also looks at the work of Newton, Herschel, Ampere, and Edison as host Marcus du Sautoy explains how the drive to quantify has led us far into space and inside the atom itself. Produced by the Open University.
Online
2011
35.

Art and Nuclear Astrophysics [electronic resource]

Accelerators can probe artwork's origins.
Online
2012
36.

Biting Apples With Science [electronic resource]

The MDT-2 can accurately measure an apple's crispness.
Online
2012
37.

Bottles, Bubbles and Breakages [electronic resource]

Mechanical engineers reveal the secret to the bottle-exploding trick.
Online
2013
38.

Anniversary of Three Mile Island [electronic resource]

In the wake of the Fukushima Meltdown, Antonio Neves reports on the continued monitoring of the site, past nuclear power disasters, and future policy implications.
Online
2011
39.

Electrical Pulses Could Make Better Wine [electronic resource]

Engineers test new technique to get more juice from grapes.
Online
2013
40.

How Small Is the Universe? [electronic resource]

Horizon plunges down the biggest rabbit-hole in history in search of the smallest thing in the Universe. It is a journey where things don't just become smaller but also a whole lot weirder. Scientists hope to catch a glimpse of miniature black holes, multiple dimensions and even parallel Universes. As they start to explore this wonderland, where nothing is quite what it seems, they may have to rewrite the fundamental laws of time and space.
Online
2013