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1.

Fate of the Earth [electronic resource]

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Explores the delicate balance of the Earth's ecology and humankind's capacity for the destruction of life. Looks at the natural forces that created the universe from the ocean's depths to the distant boundaries of the solar system. Features interviews with scientists, biologists, and ecologists who study the biology of life and discuss the newfound concern for the preservation of the planet. Examines the environmental and human impact on the Earth's ecology, including the greenhouse effect, pollution, dwindling rain forests, and the possibility of nuclear warfare.
Online
1986
2.

Nuclear Energy: Advanced Version - Imperial

In addition to covering all topics in the basic version of Nuclear Energy, this program covers a number of advanced topics. Understand the use of water to vary reactor power, as well as different methods of mining uranium and witness a specific example of a fission reaction. Students will be introduced to more detailed discussion of enrichment, including structure properties of Uranium Hexafluoride, centrifuging, gas diffusion and the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. Includes sequences designed for student enrichment and teacher background (breeder reactors, fusion and fusion reactors, fission).
Online
2017; 2008
3.

First Man on the Moon

Relive Neil Armstrong’s incredible life story — from his time as pioneer of high-speed flight to that first legendary step on the moon — through never-before heard interviews from his friends and family.
Online
2017; 2014
4.

TEDTalks: Katie Bouman—How to Take a Picture of a Black Hole

At the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close—even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth—until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.
Online
2018; 2017
5.

Making Sound

Dr. Helen Czerski investigates the extraordinary science behind sounds we're familiar with and sounds we normally can't hear. At the Palace of Westminster,she teams up with scientists from the University of Leicester to carry out state-of-the-art measurements to reveal how Big Ben vibrates to create pressure waves in the air at particular frequencies. With soprano singer Lesley Garrett, Helen explores the science of the singing voice. At the summit of Stromboli, Helen and volcanologist Dr. Jeffrey Johnson use a special microphone to record the extraordinary deep tone produced by the volcano as it explodes—a frequency far too low for the human ear to detect. Finally, at the University of Cambridge's Institute of Astronomy, Helen meets a scientist who has discovered evidence of sound w [...]
Online
2017
6.

Life, the Universe and Everything

Philosophers have always sought grand theories to explain the world's mystery. And Stephen Hawking once predicted that science would have its own Theory of Everything by 2000. Yet we are no closer to an answer. Are we necessarily limited and reality beyond reach or is a solution just round the corner? The Panel Quantum physicist Sandu Popescu, philosopher Rufus Duits and independent filmmaker David Malone envisage an ultimate theory of everything. Gabrielle Walker hosts.
Online
2017; 2015
7.

NASA - the 25th Year

Project Mercury, the United States first manned space flight program was given the go ahead just one week after NASA was formed on October 1st, 1958. Seven test pilots were selected to become astronauts. Donald K. Slayto, Alan B. Shepard, Walter Schirra, Virgil Grissom, John Glenn Jr., Leroy Cooper, and Malcolm Carpenter.
Online
2017; 2016
8.

MegaWorld: Poland

Poland's long, tumultuous history makes it a fascinating country to visit. Follow a team of detectives in the Sowie Mountains as they try to crack the mystery of a huge underground maze of tunnels built by the Nazis. See bomb disposal experts find and detonate WWII explosives that are still littered throughout the country. Other stories include Poland's rush to complete six new stadiums in time for the Euro 2012 soccer tournament, a company that makes the world's largest luxury catamarans, a trip to Poland's own Hollywood stunt school, and an amazing journey down into a 900 year-old salt mine home to the largest underground cathedral in the world.
Online
2017; 2010
9.

Spreading

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk observes that spreading decreases the energy of sound as it travels. Energy loss due to spreading is proportional to the square of the distance from the source.
Online
2015; 2011
10.

Sonar

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about sonar, which stands for sound navigation and ranging, the process by which objects (like submarines, for example) are discovered when sound waves are reflected off of them and then detected.
Online
2015; 2011
11.

Life of a Universe

Drawing inspiration from the southern sky as he travels around Australia, renowned physicist and television personality Professor Brian Cox ponders the big questions about the universe. Exploring how the universe began, how it could end and when, Brian examines the work of eminent Australian based astrophysicists Katie Mack and Brian Schmidt and speaks to acclaimed cosmological luminaries such as Neil deGrasse Tyson, Brian Greene, and more.
Online
2017
12.

George Takei

Host Neil deGrasse Tyson features his interview with actor George Takei, a.k.a "Sulu" on the original Star Trek TV series and films. Comedian co-host Leighann Lord and special guest astrophysicist Charles Liu discuss Star Trek's legacy as a series that pioneered the virtues of diversity, science and optimism in American culture.
Online
2017; 2014
13.

Nuclear Energy: The Issues

Nuclear power produces almost a fifth of the world's electricity. Supporters say it is safe, cheap and—best of all—the answer to global warming. Critics say it is not safe, or cheap. And it will not really help with the global warming problem. So who is right? This program presents the arguments for and against, with relevant background information. Issues covered in this program include: radioactive waste: how hazardous is it? Can it be safely stored? How likely is an accident at a nuclear power plant? What could the consequences be? Are nuclear power stations terrorist targets? Does nuclear power encourage the development of nuclear weapons? Is nuclear energy "carbon-free"? Is it the solution to global warming? NB: The science behind nuclear power—what nuclear fission is, how a nuc [...]
Online
2017; 2008
14.

Everything and Nothing: Nothing

Part two of the series Everything and Nothing deals with science at the very limits of human perception, where the deepest mysteries of the universe lie. Professor Al-Khalili sets out to answer one very simple question: What is nothing? His journey ends with perhaps the most profound insight about reality that humanity has made. Everything came from nothing.
Online
2017; 2011
15.

Science Under Siege

From many-worlds to the multiverse, does physics still need experiments? The Speaker George Ellis examines the fantasies of contemporary cosmology.
Online
2017; 2015
16.

Mars and Beyond - Where No Man Has Gone

This film discusses the contributions to space exploration, in particular deep space research, of Goldstone Deep Space Communication antennas and their impact on exploring Mars and beyond.
Online
2017; 2016
17.

Better Wine Through Chemistry

The single most important step to making a good wine is fermentation, which is what gives wine its particular taste and alcohol content. Winemakers add yeast—a single-celled fungus—to grape juice, and if all goes well the yeasts rapidly multiply, crowding out other microbes and allowing fermentation to complete in two to three weeks. But sometimes, the yeasts get stuck and don’t fully ferment—a problem that has plagued the wine industry for centuries. Now a team of geneticists and biotechnologists have discovered what triggers "stuck" fermentation, and are bringing winemakers one step closer to perfecting the winemaking process.
Online
2015
18.

Journey of the Universe: An Epic Story of Cosmic, Earth and Human Transformation

The Emmy® Award winning JOURNEY OF THE UNIVERSE tells an epic story of cosmic, Earth and human transformation from The Big Bang to today. Evolutionary philosopher Brian Thomas Swimme and Yale historian of religions Mary Evelyn Tucker have crafted an elegant narrative that both illuminates and celebrates the profound role humans play in the flourishing of the Earth.
Online
2015; 2011
19.

MegaWorld: Czech Republic

The Czech Republic has a long history of innovative engineering. See how they are meeting the challenges of building Europe's longest automobile tunnel right underneath the historic city of Prague. Go behind the scenes for exclusive access to the world's largest castle in downtown Prague. Watch European Truck Racing champion David Vr'ecký attempt to break the 300 km/h barrier and set a new world speed record. Other stories include a Czech company that makes the best plastic explosives, the largest earth-moving excavator in Europe, and the biggest beer spa in the world.
Online
2017; 2011
20.

Friendship 7 - John Glenn First US Man to Orbit Earth

Dawn. Cape Canaveral, Florida. A captain aboard a new kind of ship about to sail on a new kind of ocean. The vast infinite Ocean of space. Man is going there. January 27, 1962, astronaut John Glenn will be rocketed aloft on the 109-D rocket.
Online
2017; 2016