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1.

In Search of Common Ground [electronic resource]: Remaking Public Policy on Human Life Issues

Do Americans still hold certain truths to be self-evident? Do all human beings possess inalienable rights endowed by their creator? Are all lives of equal value? And if so, how do those core beliefs translate into public policy on issues such as healthcare, poverty, abortion, capital punishment, and euthanasia? This program explores what the late Joseph Cardinal Bernardin called a "consistent ethic of life," explaining how it might be used as a framework for finding common ground between rival interests and how it could be applied to serving the common good.
Online
2006; 2001
2.

A Matter of Life and Death [electronic resource]: Politics of Abortion and Capital Punishment

When it comes to situations involving life and death, the United States is strongly polarized. Liberals commonly support the legality of abortion as a private matter of personal choice but condemn the death penalty as inhumane, while conservatives often support execution as a form of justice but denounce abortion as legalized murder. How did these points of view become a part of the ideologies of the left and the right? This program traces the development of political stances on life-and-death issues, exposing the lack of a consistent life ethic in mainstream American politics.
Online
2006; 2001
3.

Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire [electronic resource]

This program takes a penetrating look at what is happening to American culture as honesty comes to be measured less by truthfulness and more by the reasons for lying and the degree of deception involved. What is to become of a society in which professional ethicists are required to help companies recapture a culture of integrity, a role previously reserved for religion? Experts include Laura Nash, Director of the Institute for Values-Centered Leadership; L. Gregory Jones, Dean of the Duke Divinity School; and Professor Jeffrey Abramson, author of We the Jury.
Online
2005; 1999
4.

Hate and the Internet [electronic resource]: Web Sites and the Issue of Free Speech

What is the price of free speech? Protected by their First Amendment rights and the Internet's cultural philosophy of "post it all and let the readers decide," American hate groups are having a field day on the World Wide Web, creating virulent virtual communities of intolerance. In this program, ABC News anchor Ted Koppel investigates the proliferation of hate online with Don Black, founder of the white nationalist Web site Storm Front, and Floyd Abrams, a First Amendment attorney who has represented The New York Times and ABC News. Together they discuss both the medium and the message, plus the controversial issue of content filtering.
Online
2006; 1998
5.

Beyond Black and White [electronic resource]: Affirmative Action in America

All sides of the affirmative action issue have targeted the same goal: ending racism of all types. But do opportunities for some have to come at the expense of others? In this Fred Friendly Seminar moderated by Harvard Law School's Charles Ogletree, a what-if scenario revolves around a university's efforts to enroll a diverse student body of qualified candidates. Panelists include Ward Connerly, proponent of California's Proposition 209; Christopher Edley, Jr., author of Not All Black & White: Affirmative Action, Race, and American Values; Julius Becton, Jr., former head of Washington, D.C.'s public schools; Ruth Simmons, president of Smith College; and policy activists from the African-American, Asian, Native American, and Latino communities.
Online
2005; 1999
6.

A Death of One's Own [electronic resource]

More and more Americans are looking for opportunities to exert some measure of control over where and how they die. In this program, veteran PBS journalist Bill Moyers unravels the complexities underlying the many choices at the end of life, including the bitter debate over physician-assisted suicide. Three patients, their families, and their doctors discuss some of the hardest decisions, including how to pay for care, what constitutes humane treatment, and how to balance dying and dignity. In the end, do these patients die the way they wanted? Yes and no.
Online
2005; 2000
7.

Business Ethics [electronic resource]: 21st-Century Perspective

The globalization of commerce has added new shades of gray to the complex subject of business ethics. In this program, Frank Daly, corporate ethics officer at Northrop Grumman; Thomas White, director of the Center for Ethics and Business at Loyola Marymount University; and David Vogel, of the Haas School of Business, analyze the challenges to making ethical choices in the Information Age. Issues raised include the need for multinationals to agree on a set of core international business values, the impact of ever-shrinking time frames on the decision-making process, and the necessity of secure data transmission.
Online
2005; 2000
8.

Dying With Dignity [electronic resource]: Sun City Choice

In this program, NewsHour correspondent Susan Dentzer reports on life and death in Sun City, Arizona, a vibrant retirement community where hospice is the preferred form of end-of-life care. Dartmouth Medical School's John Wennberg and others consider the desire of many senior citizens with terminal illnesses to make peace with death rather than fight it. They also confront the fact that statistics show no direct correlation between costly ICU interventions and patient longevity. As America's elderly population doubles over the next 35 years, will more seniors opt for meeting the end in the Sun City way?
Online
2006; 1999
9.

Difficult Decisions [electronic resource]: When a Loved One Approaches Death

When a loved one's fate lies in another's hands, the decisions can be overwhelming. This program, hosted by NewsHour's Ray Suarez, follows two families as they grapple with life-and-death decisions inside an ICU. A doctor, an ethicist, and others help these families through the process of making decisions on behalf of those who are no longer able to communicate their wishes. La Vera Crawley, of Stanford University's bioethics department, helps the families better understand the difficult decisions they are expected to make.
Online
2005; 2000
10.

Whither Biogenetics? [electronic resource]

The prospects of benefits from biotechnology are daunting-an end to disease, and to malnutrition and starvation-but equally daunting are the destructive ends to which biotechnology can be turned. More and better vaccines. An end to cancer, AIDS, and heart attacks. Cleaning up toxic wastes. These are the up side of biotechnology. The downside is the creation of dangerous and irreversible side-effects, the political use of genetic information, the development of bioweaponry, and the perversion of scientific breakthroughs to private gain. Who can foresee the future of biogenetics?
Online
2008
11.

Practical Applications and Risks of Genetic Science [electronic resource]

This program discusses the Human Genome Project, gene-related medical research, and beneficial and potentially dangerous applications of genetic technology both to humans and to plants. Efforts to fight disease through gene therapy and recombinant DNA technology are addressed, as well as research into genetically controlling cancer and organ transplant rejection. The risks of agricultural over-hybridization through genetic engineering and cloning are also explored, as well as the ethical and biological issues surrounding human cloning, alteration of the human genome, and gene warfare.
Online
2006; 1997
12.

Peter Singer [electronic resource]: Dangerous Mind

Dr. Peter Singer has been called the most influential living philosopher. He has also been called a monster. In this thought-provoking program, he faces his critics and discusses his ideas on euthanasia, abortion, and infanticide. The program follows his worldwide tour of lectures and encounters, including case conferences and a trip to Austria, where most of his family was killed in the Holocaust. A range of commentators consider his utilitarian stance and its impact on public policy, including Wesley J. Smith, a bioethicist and attorney with International Task Force on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide; Raimond Gaita, professor of moral philosophy at London University; and Harold T. Shapiro, former president of Princeton University, where Dr. Singer teaches.
Online
2005; 2003
13.

Gay Marriage and the Constitution [electronic resource]

This ABC News program looks at the constitutional controversy over gay marriage as it exploded in both Massachusetts and California in February 2004. Is it a matter of civil rights or human rights? Should it be addressed at a state level or a federal level? Ted Koppel moderates a debate about gay marriage and its legal ramifications with Representative Barney Frank, conservative political activist Gary Bauer, and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, who arranged for the issuance of marriage licenses to eligible same-sex couples because the California Family Code is allegedly in violation of the state's constitution in the matter of gay marriage.
Online
2006; 2004
14.

Ethics and Social Responsibility in Business [electronic resource]

Many businesses abide by a code of conduct, either company-specific or industry-wide. This timely program distinguishes between ethical behavior and social responsibility by spotlighting two well-known Australian businesses that exhibit both qualities: Bendigo Bank and its Community Bank initiative, a cooperatively spirited venture that teaches solid commercial principles to franchisees, and The Body Shop, a skincare product provider that calls itself an activist organization committed to positive social and environmental change and a retailer committed to customer service excellence. The underlying message? Good community is good business.
Online
2005; 2003
15.

Sex, Drugs, and Consenting Adults [electronic resource]: What's Wrong With That?

What is the cost to society for making certain personal choices-those considered by many to be immoral or ill-advised-a crime? And how is the concept of individual liberty affected when the force of public censure is replaced by the force of law? In this program, ABC News anchor John Stossel studies this extremely complex and volatile subject, searching for mid-ground between the left and the right. High-level policy makers, such as the president of the ACLU and the head of the DEA; experts, including a Stanford University law professor; and private citizens sound off about drug use, pornography, prostitution, gambling, ticket scalping, unendorsed medical treatments, and assisted suicide-and question the outright hypocrisy that is too much in evidence.
Online
2006; 1998
16.

Playing God [electronic resource]

Is the new genetics running ahead of society's ability to supervise it, or does genetic science bring huge benefits that humanity should willingly embrace? In this thought-provoking program, Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Rowan Williams asserts the need for religious belief in the modern world to Sir John Sulston, Nobel Prize winner and the guiding spirit behind the Human Genome Project, and to Shahana Hashmi, who recently won a legal battle to create a genetically enhanced child. An ideal resource for understanding the ongoing debate on the Anglican church's view of progressive science. Filmed at Lambeth Palace.
Online
2006; 2003
17.

Spares or Repairs [electronic resource]: Applications and Implications of Cloning

Beginning with Dolly, this program explores the successes of cloning animals and specialized cells, the use of cultured neurons to combat degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, and the future of tissue engineering, as well as the ethical dilemmas attending the science of genetics. Researchers from Roslin Institute, including Ian Wilmut; Robert Winston, professor of fertility studies at the University of London; and biologist/author Colin Tudge are featured. Footage of DNA extraction from an egg, stem cells growing into brain cells, and neuronal implantation offer a glimpse of the future of medicine.
Online
2005; 2000
18.

Nanoparticles and Mega-Fears [electronic resource]: Debating the Risks of Nanotechnology

Alongside the glittery promise of nanotechnology sits a Pandora's box of potential concerns that range from worrisome applications like nano-enhanced surveillance devices and weapon systems to unintended consequences such as nanopollution and nanotoxicity. This program takes a balanced look at the debate over potential nanotech risks as it presents viewers with the informed opinions of advocates and opponents alike. A voyage of discovery that spans the globe, Nanoparticles and Mega-fears discusses the "gray goo effect" and transhumanism, nanos on the battlefield, nanoscale RFID tagging, the leaching of nanoparticles into the ecosystem, nanoscale effects on the human body, and more. The question of a nanotech gap between developed and developing countries is addressed as well. An exce [...]
Online
2010; 2009
19.

Newshour Business Ethics Anthology [electronic resource]

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is renowned for its balanced, in-depth reporting. This anthology of NewsHour segments comes to terms with thorny issues of business ethics. Through interviews with key figures and insightful analysis, the anthology blends case studies and background reports to explore the Enron affair, stratospheric executive compensation, Wall Street irregularities, and other topical business concerns within their broader contexts.
Online
2006
20.

Playing Hurt [electronic resource]: Ethics and Sports Medicine

Imagine that it's the week of the football championship game, and a star player may have an undisclosed head injury. Everyone wants him to play. If you were the coach, would you let him? Or picture a talented WNBA hopeful who has torn her ACL - for the third time. Add in bouts of bulimia and her lifelong dream of going pro. As her adviser, what would you do? These are only two of the agonizing questions that Harvard Law School's Charles Ogletree puts to a panel of dedicated and deeply concerned sports experts. In this Fred Friendly Seminar, filmed at an annual meeting of The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, they explore the ethical and medical issues - and moral obligations - that come into play whenever an athlete becomes a patient. Topics include conflicts of inter [...]
Online
2005