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1.

Divergent

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In a world where people are divided into distinct factions based on human virtues, Tris Prior is warned she is Divergent and will never fit into any one group. When she discovers a conspiracy by a faction leader to destroy all Divergents, Tris must learn to trust in the mysterious Four and together they must find out what makes being Divergent so dangerous before it's too late.
DVD
2014
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
2.

Erik H. Erikson: A Life's Work : A Film

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(Producer) Using archival materials and newly shot footage, this film introduces students to the rich wisdom of Erik H. Erikson. Best known for his identification of eight stages of the life cycle, Erikson spent a lifetime observing and studying the way in which the interplay of genetics, cultural influences and unique experiences produces individual human lives. This video combines biographical information about Erkison with his theoretical proposals to give students an understanding of the relationship between the life experience of a theorist and the work that is produced.
VHS
1992
Ivy (By Request)
3.

Personality

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Examines various theories about personality types. Presents leading schools of personality theory, including psychoanalytic, social-learning, humanistic, and behavioral. Reviews contributions of Freud, Horney, Adler, and Jung to the development of a psychodynamic approach to personality, and Bandura's combination of cognitive and behavioral approaches. Investigates the five-factor trait model of personality, showing how twin studies indicate a consistency in personality traits. Shows use of PET scans to investigate a biological component of personality.
VHS
1990
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Personality

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A study of one individual in an attempt to better understand the subject of personality.
VHS
1998; 1979
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Testing and Intelligence [electronic resource]

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Discusses intelligence and how can it be measured. Reveals how the theory and practice of psychological testing assigns values to different abilities, behaviors, and personalities. Includes commentary by Dr. Claude Steele of Stanford University and Dr. Robert Sternberg of Yale University.
Online
2001
6.

Being Myself [electronic resource]: Bilingualism and Identity

In this program, three bilingual and bicultural women discuss their experience with language and identity, and the ways in which culture has influenced both. Eriko, who is Japanese but educated in the U.K., finds it easier to express herself in English than in her native tongue. Kazuho is also Japanese, but moved to the U.S. as a child before returning to Japan as a teen. She shares her perceptions about language as a reflection of Asian and American societal differences. And Janet, raised in Japan and Hawaii, is the daughter of a second-generation Japanese father and a mother who was born in Japan. "I'm American when they want me to be, and Japanese when they want me to be," she says.
Online
1997
7.

The Social Brain [electronic resource]

By nature, humans are a social species. Our brains are wired from birth with programs that were crucial to our distant ancestors. Infants come equipped with a basic repertoire of social skills. And yet, as history has shown, there is a dark side to the human brain. The evidence is overwhelming that throughout our history as a species, relations between individuals and societies have been destructive as well as positive. As series host Roger Bingham explains: "We are living in the Space Age with brains from the Stone Age. We need to 'tune' our psychology, to figure out how to turn up the volume on ancient instincts like cooperation and turn down the volume on instincts like organized aggression.
Online
1995
8.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Larry Smith - Why You Will Fail to Have a Great Career

In this funny and blunt TEDTalk, Larry Smith pulls no punches when he calls out the absurd excuses people invent when they fail to pursue their passions. A professor of economics at the University of Waterloo in Canada, Smith coaches his students to find the careers that they will truly love.
Online
2012
9.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Scilla Elworthy - Fighting With Non-Violence

How do you deal with a bully without becoming a thug? In this wise and soulful TEDTalk, peace activist Scilla Elworthy maps out the skills we need - as nations and individuals - to fight extreme force without using force in return. To answer the question of why and how non-violence works, she evokes historical heroes - Aung San Suu Kyi, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela - and the personal philosophies that powered their peaceful protests.
Online
2012
10.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Ariel Garten - Know Thyself With a Brain Scanner

Imagine playing a video game controlled by your mind. Now imagine that game also teaches you about your own patterns of stress, relaxation, and focus. In this TEDTAlk, Ariel Garten shows how looking at our own brain activity gives new meaning to the ancient dictum "know thyself." As CEO of InteraXon, Garten works to close the gap between science, art, business, and technology.
Online
2012
11.

Feel Good About Failure [electronic resource]: The Dark Side of Self-Esteem Classes

In a highly competitive society, what harm could possibly come from providing self-esteem classes at school? In this program, ABC News anchors Diane Sawyer and Sam Donaldson and correspondent John Stossel find out as they probe the downside of the self-esteem movement. In an absence of statistics confirming any salutary effects from such classes, research indicates that intensive praise can undercut students' desire to accept greater scholastic challenges. In fact, the American Psychological Association believes that artificially inflated self-esteem can actually set the stage for school violence. Are children inadvertently being taught that there is no connection between effort and excellence?
Online
1998
12.

28 Up Part 1 [electronic resource]: U.K.

After three previous installments, each one covering a particular stage of human growth and development, the Up series expanded its approach and turned age 28 into a multi-part episode. It's also worth noting that a revised version of the original 7 Up program was created, offering viewers new voice-over narration and additional content. Here, the re-edited 7 Up functions as an in-depth look back at early childhood and as a splendid stage-setter for meeting the participants at age 28 (which happens in items 51879 and 51880). Revisiting the 1964 classic reminds us once again of how absorbing, multifaceted, and changeable each of these personal journeys has been and how difficult it is to predict the life-path of any child-even in postwar, class-dominated Britain.
Online
1984
13.

Stressed Monkeys Eat More [electronic resource]

Researchers in Atlanta studied a group of dominant monkeys and a group of subordinate monkeys to track their eating habits. The subordinate monkeys ate more of the food that was full of fats and sugars. Scientists say that food high in fat and sugar are comfort foods, and the monkeys under stress from their dominant counterparts were drawn to that food. This ABC News report looks at the correlation of this study to the eating habits of humans.
Online
2008
14.

Too Good to Be True? [electronic resource]: The Truth About Lying

Lying is part of human nature; it is believed that babies as young as six months old will fake a cry to get their mother's attention. This ABC News report looks at lying and the differences between the lies men and women tell. Women lie about their age or weight, and men lie about their height and how successful they are.
Online
2013
15.

Inside Out [electronic resource]: Portraits of Children - a Film by Joanna Lipper

In Joanna Lipper's riveting, award-winning documentary about imagination and creativity in childhood, children between the ages of 5 and 12 tell their life stories with humor, sadness, and honesty. Factors including divorce, adoption, religion, immigration, cultural legacy, and death in the family are addressed as these children, who come from diverse backgrounds, internalize the world around them and then share that vision with vivid imagination and unnerving precocity. With the relationship between knowledge and loss of innocence as a central theme, this internationally-acclaimed documentary, which had its television premiere on the Sundance Channel, presents compelling portraits of young identities in the process of development.
Online
1997
16.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Janine Shepherd - a Broken Body Isn't a Broken Person

Cross-country skier Janine Shepherd hoped for an Olympic medal - until she was hit by a truck during a training bike ride. In this TEDTalk, she shares a powerful story about the human potential for recovery. Her message: you are not your body...and giving up old dreams can allow new ones to soar.
Online
2012
17.

Future Seems Closer Than the Past [electronic resource]

How we see the past and future could have an impact on our own happiness.
Online
2013
18.

Why More Americans Are Living Alone [electronic resource]

More and more Americans are living alone, according to sociologist Eric Klinenberg's new book, "Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone." NewsHour correspondent Ray Suarez and Klinenberg discuss the emerging demographic, so-called "singletons," and what he calls the "biggest unnamed social change of the last 50 years." Origina?
Online
2012
19.

The Face [electronic resource]: The Evolution of Beauty

Is there a universal characteristic that defines beauty? Has the human gene pool been altered over the millennia by a process of selection based on this characteristic? In this program, experts from Harvard, Yale, and the University of California explore facial evolution, the brain's specialized ability to recognize familiar faces, the ways in which expressions are used to actively and passively communicate, the intricacies of craniofacial surgery, facial recognition by computers, and the technology that can produce an artificially made face. In addition, prosopagnosia (the inability to recognize faces), Mobius syndrome (also known as dead face), and the reconstruction of a congenitally deformed face are investigated using case histories.
Online
1998
20.

The View From Within [electronic resource]: The Reality of Consciousness

The human body can function without being conscious - it does so when we're anesthetized or asleep. Where does consciousness go when we're not awake? In this program, James Burke explores the reticular formation, a part of the brain involved in regulating states of consciousness, touching on possible functions of dreaming and sleep as ways to integrate the day's experiences into our internal model of the world. Burke also explains what goes on in a person's consciousness when one is deciding to attend a party, from finding the place to recognizing the host to making small talk and navigating social interactions.
Online
1980