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61.

Shedding Light on Reflection [electronic resource]

Using exciting live-action demonstrations and easy-to-understand animation, this video delves into the fundamental concepts of reflection and its relationship to light, vision, and the physical world. Topics include: What is reflection? How do mirrors form images? How do they reflect light differently depending on their properties? In what way are mirror images different from two-dimensional photographs? How does our ability to see in three dimensions affect the way we see mirror images? Can animals see things in mirrors? And how do periscopes work? These questions, and many more, are answered in this entertaining and informative program, which includes a variety of optical illusions and magic tricks that incorporate reflection. Viewers will never look into a mirror in the same way again!
Online
2012
62.

Shedding Light on Refraction [electronic resource]

Anyone standing in front of a mirror will instantly recognize the concept of reflection at work, but to observe the process of refraction and to develop an in-depth knowledge of it is quite a different story. This video helps students understand how light behaves when it passes through transparent materials and how refraction plays a role in nature and in human life. With engaging explanations and no-nonsense animation, the program explains the refractive index, incident ray, angle of incidence, refracted ray, angle of refraction, normal line, and what it means for light to turn "toward the normal" or "away from the normal." Helpful graphics illustrate the velocities at which light travels through a vacuum, air, water, and glass, and how these speeds are used in physics and optics ca [...]
Online
2012
63.

Hearing [electronic resource]: Science of the Senses

Our ears may have evolved for purposes of survival, but they also afford us the gift of music. How is it that a melody can "give wings to the mind," as Plato said, and so profoundly affect the human heart? In this program, finding the answer to that question will take viewers on a journey through the ear, into the brain, and straight into the core of the human psyche. Viewers meet world-class neuroscientists like Daniel Levitin, author of This Is Your Brain on Music, and Steven Pinker, author of The Stuff of Thought. Stories and case studies reveal a woman whose brain cannot "hear" music and a deaf musician who is one of the world's top percussionists. Meanwhile, Dr. Blake Papsin of Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children shows how a revolutionary device called the cochlear implant is r [...]
Online
2008
64.

Shedding Light on Color [electronic resource]

Color adds beauty to our lives and helps us express our deepest feelings, but what exactly is it? This video lays out the scientific principles at the heart of that question, examining the relationship between light and color, the physical and chemical properties that create it, and the ways in which humans and animals perceive it. Viewers are shown how light can be broken down into component colors-or, more accurately, wavelengths-and are given simple demonstrations that clarify important concepts. These include paint mixing studies, electricity and magnetism experiments, and computerized diagrams that show how various energy wavelengths correspond to specific colors and color ranges. A fascinating introduction to light, its effects, and how it colors our world!
Online
2012
65.

The Face [electronic resource]: The Evolution of Beauty

Is there a universal characteristic that defines beauty? Has the human gene pool been altered over the millennia by a process of selection based on this characteristic? In this program, experts from Harvard, Yale, and the University of California explore facial evolution, the brain's specialized ability to recognize familiar faces, the ways in which expressions are used to actively and passively communicate, the intricacies of craniofacial surgery, facial recognition by computers, and the technology that can produce an artificially made face. In addition, prosopagnosia (the inability to recognize faces), Mobius syndrome (also known as dead face), and the reconstruction of a congenitally deformed face are investigated using case histories.
Online
1998
66.

Shedding Light on Lenses [electronic resource]

Without lenses, vast areas of human knowledge, from astronomy to microbiology, would never have developed - not to mention photography and the movies! This video uses compelling animation sequences and other visuals to explain how convex and concave lenses produce images in a wide variety of situations. After a concise overview of refraction, the program illustrates how magnifying glasses work and how projectors cast images onto cinema screens. It then looks, quite literally, into a tuna fish's eye as a basis for showing how vision works. After further explaining how light travels through concave lenses, the film discusses how corrective eyewear helps people who have vision defects. Viewers are also given a chance to consider aspects of slow motion, fast motion, and stop motion image [...]
Online
2013
67.

How Does Your Brain Recognize Faces? [electronic resource]

Researchers found that specific nerve clusters are responsible for identifying facial differences.
Online
2013
68.

Optical Illusion Can Improve Your Golf Game [electronic resource]

A clever mind game may help you score a birdie!
Online
2013
69.

Taking Better Photos for Mobile Devices [electronic resource]

Neuroscientists study how people view images and recommend tips for photographers.
Online
2012
70.

Texting While Driving [electronic resource]: Creating the Perfect Storm of Distraction

Human factors psychologists show how texting while driving has dangerous effects on driver performance.
Online
2012
71.

Neuromarketing [electronic resource]: Programming the Brain to Buy

More and more companies are turning to neuromarketing-a controversial practice that involves studying the human brain and how a consumer's neural pathways might respond to certain stimuli. It's based on the idea that 90 percent of the choices we make happen at a subconscious level. The goal is to bypass our higher reasoning and even our emotional judgment to sell more products. An obvious case study in neuromarketing comes from McDonald's. They developed a perfume which was subtly diffused in restaurants to increase brand association and boost sales. Proctor & Gamble also tried a similar trick. Sales of Ariel washing powder increased by 70 percent after an artificial perfume was placed under the lid. But is exploiting the way we're wired legitimate marketing, or is it closer to Orwel [...]
Online
2012
72.

The Eye of the Beholder

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The story of an artist, who becomes involved in the killing of a beautiful girl, as he appears variously to a number of witnesses.
VHS
1976; 1953
Ivy (By Request)
73.

Mind Over Machine

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In this program, archcritic of the artificial intelligence establishment, Hubert Dreyfus, discusses the nature of human intuition and perception. He claims that these basic and essential phenomena of consciousness will never be replicated by computing machines.
VHS
1988
Ivy (By Request)
74.

Scientists Exploring How Brains Perceive the World

It's not mind-reading, but some cutting-edge scientific research could reconstruct brain activity. Jake Schoneker, a recent graduate of the University of California, Berkeley's School of Journalism, and PBS NewsHour correspondent Roberto Daza report.
Online
2014; 2012
75.

The Virtuoso

Tabla virtuosoZakir Hussain explores how rhythm is the most primal sense we humans possess with neuroscientistSeth Horowitz.
Online
2017; 2013
76.

The Key to Consciousness: A Journey Into the Stuff of Thoughts

What is consciousness? Where do our thoughts come from? What are the connections between mind and matter? Even today, no one knows the answers. Human consciousness - the small inner voice that says "I", through which we apprehend the world, is one of the greatest mysteries in contemporary science. Scientists believe that our thoughts and feelings do not spring from a disembodied mind but from the body, and specifically from one particular organ: the brain. As far as they are concerned, our every least whim and all our choices are written into the tangle of neurons in a code that has yet to be deciphered. But that still does not tell us where decisions are made. Is it possible to identify the physical seat of free will? How does our consciousness influence the workings of our brain? F [...]
Online
2016
77.

Mindfulness in the Workplace

Is meditation the key to fostering a happier, more productive workplace? New York Times reporter David Gelles investigates this claim and compares notes with a neuroscientist who specializes in the effect of meditation on the brain, Christopher Moore. Gelles is a staff writer for the New York. Previously, he was a correspondent for the Financial Times, and his work has appeared in Forbes, the Los Angeles Times, and other publications. Christopher I. Moore is Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Brown University where he teaches neural dynamics. How changing brain dynamics can change perception from moment to moment, particularly in meditative states ,is a key focus of his research.
Online
2017; 2015
78.

Bouquet in a Bottle

The star sommelier of The Bernardin has his famous nose put to the test by neurochemist Terry Acree. How sophisticated can our sense of smell get? Aldo Sohm oversees a 15,000 bottle wine collection made up of 900 wine selections from 12 countries with vintages from as early as 1875. Terry Acree is Professor of Food Science at Cornell University. His laboratory is interested in why there is such a functional variation in taste and olfaction that has been observed for decades in human populations. Understanding the relationship between stimulant composition and perception becomes central to understanding the representation of chemical information in the brain and the impact of genetic diversity on the perception of food.
Online
2017; 2015
79.

Acutal Consciousness

Are our minds confined to our bodies? The speaker and eminent philosopher, Ted Honderich, uncovers the true reach of human consciousness.
Online
2017; 2015
80.

Brainwave Dreams: Part 3—The Compass of Pleasure

In "The Compass of Pleasure," Johns Hopkins neuroscientist David J. Linden explains how pleasure affects us at the most fundamental level: in our brain. The master chocolatier Jacques Torres provides the audience with samples of his most mouthwatering selections to allow participants to both experience pleasure while the process itself is being discussed. Presented as part of the Brainwave series at the Rubin Museum of Art.
Online
2017; 2011