You searched for:

Subject
:
Nonfiction Television Programs
x
Subject
:
United States — Foreign Relations — Vietnam
x
6 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

LBJ and Vietnam: In the Eye of the Storm

Loading...
Uses secret recordings of phone conversations, cabinet meetings and other discussions between Lyndon Johnson and key officials of his administration, along with reenactments of those meetings to offer a different view of the Vietnam War and its effect on Johnson's presidency.
Online
2002
2.

Interview With Lloyd M. (Mike) Rives, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
Mike Rives was an American diplomat in Cambodia from 1969 - 1970. Mr. Rives describes the difficulty in dealing with Prince Sihanouk, and the atmosphere in Phnom Penh after Lon Nol took over the government. He speaks about the American incursion into Vietnam and his discussions with General Alexander Haig about giving military support to Lon Nol's government.
Online
1983
3.

Interview With Paul M. Kattenburg, 1981 [electronic resource]

Loading...
Paul M. Kattenburg spent five months in 1952 at the US Embassy in Saigon, and from 1954 to 1963 worked in the Research and Analysis Division of the State Department. He notes that at the time there was a scarcity of Vietnam experts available due to the relative isolation of the region and the lingering effects of McCarthyism. Kattenberg also describes Saigon scene in 1952 and his impression of Bao Dai's government. Kattenberg states that the continued support Ngo Dinh Diem was decided by the US Ambassador to Vietnam Frederick Reinhardt. During this period the United States was not yet fully involved in Vietnam and considered to be subordinate to the French.
Online
1983
4.

Interview With U. Alexis (Ural Alexis) Johnson, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
Deputy Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam, Alexis Johnson recalls the 1954 Geneva Conference when the French were pressuring the United States to send additional assistance to their battle in Vietnam in the form of air raids. Johnson recalls trying to form a pact with the other countries at the Conference regarding collective action against communist aggression in Vietnam. Johnson recalls the US view of the Vietnamese conflict as a fluid one in which the French were the major players. Johnson relates the eventual agreement between the French and the Viet Minh to draw a line at the seventeenth parallel, dividing Vietnam into north and south sections. The United States, while not fully satisfied with the agreement, decided to uphold it and avoid the use of force to upset it.
Online
1983
5.

Interview With Lucien Bodard, 1981 [electronic resource]

Loading...
French reporter and writer Lucien Bodard recalls life in Saigon during 1954 and the rise of the Binh Xuyen, the Vietnamese paramilitary crime organization. Bodard also discusses the relationship between the United States and France and their relationships with the culture and people of Vietnam.
Online
1983
6.

Interview With Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
As the sister-in-law of President Diem, Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu was considered the first lady of South Vietnam in the late 1950s through the early 1960s. Here she argues that the Diem government was the only legitimate government in South Vietnam, that they were undermined by the United States and that the United States, therefore, paid a price. She discusses the Buddhist Crisis of 1963 and the results of the Paris Peace Accords. She reflects on Ngo Dinh Nhu and President Diem's characters and her own reputation as the "Dragon Lady" of Vietnam. Finally, she describes the diplomatic efforts of Ngo Dinh Nhu towards North Vietnam and the arrogance of the United States in intervening.
Online
1983