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1.

TV in the Army

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975. "In these days, the safety of our nation and those of the entire free world depends upon American military strength. One of the main sources of our military strength lies in the constant development of newer and better tools of warfare. In this program, one of the most unique and versatile devices now being used by the Army is shown--television. The military possibilities of television are many and promising. Some, as are shown, have already proven themselves; others are yet to be tested. Whatever the possibilities, the Army continues to explore all avenues open to it by military television."--National Archives and Records Administration.
Online
1953
2.

Nerves of the Army

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975. "Throughout the world, wherever the Army stands, the Signal Corps keeps it alert. In making this picture, the camera crews visited Signal Corps engineering laboratories at Fort Monmouth, N.J., and the Army Electronic Proving Ground at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. Television audiences will look at a simulated battlefield of the future, and see how some Signal equipment, and how communications systems developed at the proving grounds, would be employed. The operation of the new 100-inch camera with its infra-red lens, capable of penetrating 26 miles through haze, will be shown in reconnaissance missions. This is a new form of reconnaissance -- under atomic or non-atomic conditions."--National Archives and Records Administration.
Online
1954
3.

Pictorial Report Number 25

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From the U.S. Army's The Big Picture television series, 1950-1975.; "In spite of the fact that the Army has been in existence for some 181 years, during which time it has successfully defended the country in all of its wars, the need today is increasing for more trained engineers. These same engineers when employed by the Army become all-important citizens in America. Without engineers no nation can grow, and in this technological age no civilized nation can continue to exist without the constant efforts of highly-trained, scientifically educated men. This week's pictorial report compares this nation with the Soviet Union,655 7 where engineers are being trained at an enormous rate for the Russians well realize where lie the springs of power in this technological age. For the second s [...]
Online
1956