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Nonfiction Television Programs
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Tet Offensive, 1968
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War
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1.

Interview With Myron Harrington, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Colonel Myron Harrington was a Marine captain at the Battle of Hue during the Tet Offensive, ostensibly an Allied victory that resulted in the destruction of the town and the killing of its residents--and marked the beginning of the loss of the American public's support of the war. Harrington is credited with the quotation "Did we have to destroy the town in order to save it?" He recounts the battle in great detail, from the preparations to what exactly he saw, saying it is impossible to divorce oneself from the "horrors."
Online
1983
2.

Interview With W.W. (Walt Whitman) Rostow, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Walt Rostow served as Special Assistant for National Security Affairs for Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. In this capacity, he played a significant role in shaping U.S. policy in Southeast Asia. He discusses his optimism for the war through 1967, and even more so after the Tet Offensive. Mr. Rostow describes the positions of fellow administration insiders such as Clark Clifford, Dean Rusk, and the Wise Men. He reflects on Lyndon Johnson's decision not to seek reelection, and the decisions to pursue peace talks and to halt bombings in Vietnam. He gives his opinions of what ultimately went wrong in Vietnam, and the impact that the Vietnam War has had on the United States.
Online
1983
3.

Interview With William C. (William Childs) Westmoreland, 1981 [electronic resource]

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General William C. Westmoreland directed the American military presence on the ground in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. Here he discusses the situation in Vietnam in 1964 and various events during the War, including the Marine landing at Da Nang in 1965, Operation Rolling Thunder, and the Tet Offensive. He describes the successes and failures of American military efforts in Vietnam and the strengths of various units. Finally, he reflects on the Johnson Administration's 1968 decision not to pursue a war-winning strategy.
Online
1983
4.

Interview With Leslie H. Gelb, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Leslie Gelb served in the Defense Department in the late 1960s and later worked as a correspondent for the New York Times. He describes tensions within the Defense Department and recalls Robert McNamara's 1967 testimony that the bombing of North Vietnam was not working as a turning point. He discusses how America's lack of knowledge about Vietnam and its people shaped diplomacy. Finally, he describes inaccurate calculations on the part of General Westmoreland and how the Pentagon measured military success.
Online
1983