You searched for:

Subject
:
Nonfiction Television Programs
x
Subject
:
Indochinese War (1946-1954)
x
4 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Samuel W. Yorty

Loading...
"Participants: Representative Samuel W. Yorty (D-CA) interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Kenneth Crawford. Topics: Emphasis on air power in the Indochina war, campaign issues, and House Un-American Activities Committee investigations."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, August 4, 1954 (200LW591).
Online
1954
2.

Interview With Philip Geoffrey Malins, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
British General Philip Geoffrey Malins recounts his arrival in Saigon in 1945, describing the situation as "peaceful." Malins recalls being able to drive around the outskirts of Saigon without much trouble, and how that situation soon began to deteriorate. Malins also talks about his superior General Gracey as a humane, loyal person who served as a father figure to Malins. Malins continues talking about his job and the responsibility he had to ensure there was enough food for his people and the French civil population during the postwar famine in Vietam. Malins arranged for an open market that would allow anyone to buy food. He describes the policy surrounding the market and how it affected the troops as well as the civilians.
Online
1983
3.

Interview With U. Alexis (Ural Alexis) Johnson, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
Deputy Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam, Alexis Johnson recalls the 1954 Geneva Conference when the French were pressuring the United States to send additional assistance to their battle in Vietnam in the form of air raids. Johnson recalls trying to form a pact with the other countries at the Conference regarding collective action against communist aggression in Vietnam. Johnson recalls the US view of the Vietnamese conflict as a fluid one in which the French were the major players. Johnson relates the eventual agreement between the French and the Viet Minh to draw a line at the seventeenth parallel, dividing Vietnam into north and south sections. The United States, while not fully satisfied with the agreement, decided to uphold it and avoid the use of force to upset it.
Online
1983
4.

Interview With Pham Duy, 1982 [electronic resource]

Loading...
Pham Duy is a Vietnamese musician who fought in the Viet Minh against the French, but later became disenchanted with Communism and left Vietnam to live in the United States. He briefly describes the hardships under French rule, and why he was moved to write songs for the resistance. He sings some of his more famous songs, and explains the lyrical meanings contained in them. He finally explains why he could not support the Communists despite his association with the Viet Minh.
Online
1983