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1.

Life, Animated

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A coming-of-age story about a boy and his family who overcame great challenges by turning Disney animated movies into a language to express love, loss, kinship, and brotherhood.
DVD
2016
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

The Hidden Face of Fear

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Studying the traumatic impact of 9/ll, neuroscientists and psychologists are approaching a common understanding of how the brain's fear circuitry works, and changes. The film features interviews with some of the world's leading experts on fear and memory, including neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux, Nobel Prize-winning neurobiologist Eric R. Kandel, neuropsychiatrist David Silbersweig, and other psychologists and neuroscientists at New York University's Center for the Neuroscience of Fear and Anxiety.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

The Mind

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1999
Ivy (By Request)
4.

The Brain: Teaching Modules

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Included in this series on the brain are the latest findings on Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, brain transplants, epilepsy, autism, and many other topics.
VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
6.

Teaching Modules 1-10 [electronic resource]: The Mind

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Updated and expanded teaching modules from "The Mind" video series. Provides insight on the latest findings on the cognitive domain of human behavior and what it means to be human. Modules present current findings on language processing, drug treatment and addictions, and cognitive development throughout the life span. The programs also cover mood and personality disorders, and pain and its treatment.
Online
1999
7.

Teaching Modules 11-17 [electronic resource]: The Mind

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Updated and expanded teaching modules from "The Mind" video series. Provides insight on the latest findings on the cognitive domain of human behavior and what it means to be human. Modules present current findings on language processing, drug treatment and addictions, and cognitive development throughout the life span. The programs also cover mood and personality disorders, and pain and its treatment.
Online
1999
8.

Teaching Modules 18-28 [electronic resource]: The Mind

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Updated and expanded teaching modules from "The Mind" video series. Provides insight on the latest findings on the cognitive domain of human behavior and what it means to be human. Modules present current findings on language processing, drug treatment and addictions, and cognitive development throughout the life span. The programs also cover mood and personality disorders, and pain and its treatment.
Online
1999
9.

Teaching Modules 29-35 [electronic resource]: The Mind

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Updated and expanded teaching modules from "The Mind" video series. Provides insight on the latest findings on the cognitive domain of human behavior and what it means to be human. Modules present current findings on language processing, drug treatment and addictions, and cognitive development throughout the life span. The programs also cover mood and personality disorders, and pain and its treatment.
Online
1999
10.

Cognitive Neuroscience [electronic resource]

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Explores technology that allows scientists to see the brain at work and identifies some of the functions performed by different parts of the brain. Shows how cognitive neuroscience allies psychologists, biologists, brain researchers, and others in what is perhaps the most dramatic advance in the last decade of psychological research. Includes commentary by Dr. John Gabrieli of Stanford University and Dr. Stephen Kosslyn of Harvard University.
Online
2001
11.

How Science Works [electronic resource]: Bad Vibes

What's the worst sound in the entire world? It's a question that's certain to produce more than one opinion. To get as many answers as possible, acoustic engineer Trevor Cox created an Internet experiment that generated millions of responses to the query. Cox also developed a system of compiling, organizing, and interpreting the results, and he describes his investigation in this fascinating video. Viewers will gain insight into the collection and analysis of scientific data, quantitative and qualitative research methods, and the role of the peer review process-the scientific community's time-tested way of validating new findings.
Online
2007
12.

Making Sense of Sensory Information, With Dale Purves, Ph.D. [electronic resource]

Because seeing is so important to human functioning, efforts to understand how perceptions are generated have most often focused on vision. Based on research in cognitive neuroscience, this program explores the challenge of explaining visual perception. The video includes an overview of the human visual system, illustrated with animated graphics and live action footage, and describes, using a series of engaging optical demonstrations, the profound technical and philosophical challenges scientists face in attempting to explain perception. The program ends with a thought-provoking discussion of the essential role of human experience in determining what we perceive.
Online
2008
13.

The Secret World of Pain [electronic resource]

Some people suffer chronic pain long after an injury has healed, while others can jump from a two-story building and not feel a thing. This film reveals the physiological foundations of both scenarios as it examines the mechanics of pain perception. Viewers meet a family whose unique genetic code has lent insight into the sensation of pain, while a man who cut off his own arm to save his life describes what he felt - and what he didn't feel - during the unthinkable experience. Researchers are finding that even early childhood events play a role in the ability to tolerate pain, and that a blend of neurology and psychology yields promising new treatments in its management.
Online
2011
14.

Discovering the Human Brain [electronic resource]: New Pathways to Neuroscience, With Susan Bookheimer, Ph.D.

Using the resources of the UCLA Brain Mapping Center, this program illustrates the development of neuroscience from its classical reliance on information from brain injuries and autopsies through current-day insights discovered with electronic microscopes, EEG equipment, PET scans, and MRI machines. Examples of research that utilizes these tools are presented, including a study on the role of mirror neurons in autism and the mapping of a woman's several language centers before surgery for a brain tumor. Animations and graphics review the gross anatomy of the brain and the actions of its neurons.
Online
2007
15.

Human Brain Development [electronic resource]: Nature and Nurture, With Helen Neville, Ph.D.

The fascinating interplay of genetic predispositions and experience in the development of the brain after birth is demonstrated in this program filmed at the Brain Development Laboratory at the University of Oregon. Three profiles of plasticity are depicted with compelling footage of behavioral, MRI, and EEG research into the development of visual perception and language acquisition from infancy through old age. A congenitally Deaf young woman, university students with unimpaired hearing, and lively preschool children participate in controlled studies that illustrate both how neuroscience research is conducted and how all brains change over time and circumstance.
Online
2007
16.

The Emotional Brain [electronic resource]: An Introduction to Affective Neuroscience, With Brian Knutson, Ph.D.

Emotions deeply color individual human existence and shape all aspects of our interpersonal and intellectual experiences. In this program, animations and fMRI images introduce students to the sub-cortical emotional circuits in the brain and chemical processes that produce emotional responses and contribute to decision making and mental health. Live action sequences, both in laboratory and real-world situations, illustrate research on risk taking and provide intriguing examples of the factors involved in the interplay of affect and reason in making choices.
Online
2010
17.

Deafblind [electronic resource]: World Without Sight and Sound

We think in words-without access to them, how does one construct thoughts? Adam and Mark are 12-year-old boys born deaf and blind. With no exposure to language, how do they communicate with their parents? This fascinating program provides a window into the world of those who are deafblind. Gaela and Graham, two remarkable deafblind adults who lost their hearing after childhood, describe their lives and experiences-including how Graham jet skis. Using special effects that simulate sensory deprivation and compensation, the video illustrates how people such as Gaela and Graham are able to lead fulfilled, even adventurous lives.
Online
2005; 2000
18.

Inside the Head [electronic resource]: New Dimensions in Brain Research

Perhaps the most intriguing field of medicine is the one that seeks to understand consciousness itself. This program provides a tour of the most advanced work in brain research and cognitive science, as well as the latest applications of these discoveries in treating patients with brain disorders. Using MRI and EEG to determine areas of brain activity, researchers explore the connection between memory and epilepsy. New treatments are presented for Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as experimental drugs based on the recently identified Alzheimer's gene.
Online
2006; 2001
19.

Helping Them Flourish [electronic resource]

Helping children to grow and bloom properly also means taking into account their biological rhythms. This program seeks out holistic approaches to education that more scientifically organize the school day and strike a better balance between intellectual and physical development. Educators, psychologists, a geneticist, a philosopher, and others consider topics such as the times of day when students are most ready to learn and the role of play in the developing child. They also question the effectiveness of lectures and take a penetrating look at the video game phenomenon.
Online
2006; 2003
20.

The Truth About Violence [electronic resource]

Hiding deep within the human mind-or perhaps closer to its surface than many would care to know-are forces that can cause one person to assault and kill another. This program studies the primal centers of the brain and the behaviors they control in order to gain an understanding of violence. Illustrating the role of brain chemicals like dopamine and serotonin as well as social conditioning that brings belligerence to the forefront, the film shows how violence is accepted, celebrated, or conveniently overlooked. Specific topics include sleep deprivation, the link between brain damage and domestic violence, the thought processes of convicted murderers, and a Bolivian village in which fist-fighting settles legal disputes.
Online
2009; 2008