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Nervous System — Diseases
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1.

Alzheimer's Disease Level II [electronic resource]: For Assisted Living Facilities

A must-see for health care workers in assisted living facilities, this program teaches the various strategies professionals can use in managing Alzheimer's disease residents with patience and respect, while also taking steps to reduce their own stress levels. Meets Florida state requirements for Alzheimer's training. Designated for 4 contact hours of continuing nursing education.
Online
2011
2.

Alzheimer's Disease Level I [electronic resource]: Is It Delirium or Dementia? For Nursing Homes

Designed especially for nursing home personnel, this program explores several successful methods for dealing with residents who have an altered mental status. Using these methods, personnel will find their work easier and more rewarding - they will also be better able to calm the concerned family members of affected residents. Meets Florida state requirements for nursing home staff. Designated for 1 contact hour of continuing nursing education.
Online
2012
3.

Learning About Tuberous Sclerosis [electronic resource]

Tuberous sclerosis is a disorder that produces invasive lesions on the kidneys, brain, and other vital organs as a result of genetic mutations. Although the lesions are usually benign, they may causes disturbances ranging from mild learning disorders to seizures and autism. In this program pediatric specialists discuss the symptoms of tuberous sclerosis, which usually first appear in childhood, and explain the genetic science behind the disease's development. In addition, parents of young patients describe their families' experiences with TS and the treatment options available.
Online
2012
4.

Restless Legs Syndrome [electronic resource]: An Uncontrollable Urge to Move

Kendra is one of millions of individuals who can't sleep due to uncomfortable sensations in their legs. Often triggered by pregnancy or anemia, restless legs syndrome is not life-threatening, but the sleep deprivation that results can take a heavy toll. In this program, patients with restless legs syndrome describe their symptoms and how they coped before finding a medication that worked for them. Viewers also learn the four main symptoms doctors use to diagnose RLS, and clinical experts explain the role of the dopamine system in this neurosensory motor disorder.
Online
2012
5.

Catching a Killer [electronic resource]: Preventing Meningococcal Disease

Meningococcal disease has a well-deserved fearsome reputation. It can cause a lethal form of bacterial meningitis as well as septic shock, and is capable of striking quickly-often without warning-leaving patients dead or seriously impaired in a matter of hours. This program gives an overview of meningococcal disease and the vaccines that are available to prevent it. Viewers meet a patient whose case wasn't discovered by the ER doctors who initially treated her, and then learn which telltale symptom prompted her new physician to begin lifesaving treatment. The video also provides tips on how to be proactive in the prevention of meningococcal disease.
Online
2011
6.

The Multiple Sclerosis Revolution [electronic resource]

While multiple sclerosis is relatively common, it remains a mysterious disease that can be difficult to detect early, and one which can leave its victims with lifelong, devastating consequences. Nearly 400,000 Americans live with MS and it is believed to affect as many as 2.5 million people worldwide. But recent breakthroughs in the understanding of MS have dramatically transformed the way the illness is viewed by the medical community. This program explains how new findings about multiple sclerosis are leading to the development of innovative treatments and the promise of a better life for patients.
Online
2012
7.

Stroke of Insight [electronic resource]: Jill Bolte Taylor

At the age of 37, Dr. Jill Bolte suffered a massive stroke that took eight years to recover from. This experience has informed her work as a neuroanatomist - a brain anatomy scientist - and led her to start Jill Bolte Taylor Brains, Inc. In this ABC News report, Dr. Bolte discusses her book My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Experience and what the stroke taught her about the workings of the human brain.
Online
2008
8.

Med-Free Migraine Relief [electronic resource]

Seven million Americans suffer from migraines, and 50 percent of them find no relief with available medications. This ABC News report investigates a new treatment that is showing some good results. TMS or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation sends a magnetic pulse into the brain to disrupt the electrical storm that precedes a migraine.
Online
2008
9.

Breaking the Wall of Brain Degeneration [electronic resource]: How Population Studies Can Help Prevent Neurodegenerative Diseases

Due to longer life expectancy and declining fertility rates, the proportion of the population aged over 60 is growing faster than any other age group. The success of public health policies and socioeconomic development has brought new relevance to neurological diseases that often accompany aging. Most of these ailments, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, cannot yet be prevented or cured. Too little is known about the factors that cause disease and those that sustain healthy brain aging. Monique Breteler - of DZNE in Bonn, the University of Bonn, and Harvard School of Public Health - has been leading international population studies in the causes and preclinical detection of neurodegenerative diseases for over 20 years. She was awarded the 2012 Bengt Winblad Lifetime Achi [...]
Online
2012
10.

Face Recognition [electronic resource]

Most of us are able to identify people we've met before and to pick out friends from among a group of strangers simply by scanning their faces. What cognitive processes allow us to do this? What goes on in the brain when we struggle to match a name to a face? And why are some people unable to remember the faces of individuals at all? This program explores facial perception and prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize what should be familiar faces is impaired. With commentary from renown prosopagnosia researcher Dr. Vicki Bruce, the video covers facial recognition, reading faces, facial blindness, and the Bruce-Young model of face perception.
Online
2013
11.

Memory Enhancement [electronic resource]

Memory Enhancement Crossword puzzles, vitamins, and classical music have all been promoted as tools for improving memory. Panelists discuss the recent theories and research surrounding memory enhancement and help viewers separate fact from fiction.
Online
2007
12.

Sleepy Flies Help Understand Alzheimer's Brains [electronic resource]

Fruit flies can shed light on sleep disorders in Alzheimer's patients.
Online
2013
13.

Parkinson's [electronic resource]

Commonly thought of as an elderly person's affliction, Parkinson's disease in reality often begins before a patient reaches an advanced age. This film presents case studies drawn from a broader age range than is normally associated with the disorder. To start with, a 40-year-old woman explains the difficulties she experienced for about 10 years until doctors finally diagnosed her with Parkinson's. Viewers also meet a man well into his senior years who copes with the disease, aided by a physiotherapist and a daily exercise program. The causal factors, symptoms, and treatment of Parkinson's Disease are explored, with intriguing medical developments highlighted by University of Athens professor and neurosurgeon Damianos Sakas, who explains the innovative procedure known as Deep Brain St [...]
Online
2012
14.

MS Wars [electronic resource]: Hope, Science, and the Internet

Developed in 2008 by Italian researcher Paolo Zamboni, the procedure known as liberation therapy was designed to improve blood flow in the veins that drain the central nervous system. Zamboni believed his method could successfully treat multiple sclerosis, but critics complained that his studies did not conform to accepted standards of medical research. The resulting debate in the scientific community boiled over into numerous online venues. This program examines the science, controversy, and human drama surrounding liberation therapy. In addition to its clear academic benefits, the program also spins an intriguing narrative about Internet-driven movements that have reframed the doctor-patient relationship and highlighted the impact of Zamboni's conclusions on physicians, institution [...]
Online
2011
15.

The Secret World of Pain [electronic resource]

Some people suffer chronic pain long after an injury has healed, while others can jump from a two-story building and not feel a thing. This film reveals the physiological foundations of both scenarios as it examines the mechanics of pain perception. Viewers meet a family whose unique genetic code has lent insight into the sensation of pain, while a man who cut off his own arm to save his life describes what he felt - and what he didn't feel - during the unthinkable experience. Researchers are finding that even early childhood events play a role in the ability to tolerate pain, and that a blend of neurology and psychology yields promising new treatments in its management.
Online
2011
16.

Cerebral Palsy [electronic resource]

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance and posture. The disorders appear in the first few years of life. Usually they do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have trouble with tasks such as writing or using scissors. Some have other medical conditions, including seizure disorders or mental impairment.
Online
2011
17.

Cluster Headache [electronic resource]

A cluster headache is one-sided head pain that may involve tearing of the eyes and a stuffy nose. Attacks occur regularly for 1 week to 1 year, separated by long pain-free periods that last at least 1 month, possibly longer.
Online
2011
18.

Concussion (in English) [electronic resource]

In a severe impact to the head, the brain moves and hits the skull, causing injury. During a boxing match, the brain moves from side to side after the impact of a punch. Following a concussion head injury, confusion and disorientation due to temporary distortion of the brain may result.
Online
2004
19.

Seizures [electronic resource]

Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures, and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain.
Online
2011
20.

What Are Night Terrors? [electronic resource]

Night terrors. What are they and what do you do about them? I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and I want to discuss this common childhood issue with you called night terrors, or sometimes 'confusional arousals' in some of the parenting books. What happens is a young child sometime shortly after bedtime will sit upright, open their eyes, start screaming, not recognize their parents, and seem extraordinarily frightened. What's going on? Well it turns out that they are not having a nightmare. They're not actually afraid of anything conscious that they can remember and they're not awake. They're actually stuck between different stages of sleep and have this big adrenaline rush that is causing all of these behaviors with no conscious thought going with it at all. Now the typical idea of what you shoul [...]
Online
2011