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Nervous System — Diseases
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81.

He's Not Our Craig [electronic resource]: Coma

This episode focuses on Craig, who was 17 when a car hit him as he crossed a road late at night. He suffered a massive head injury and was in a deep coma for three weeks. When he awoke, it became clear that the brain damage had left him with a completely different personality. Five years after his accident, the new Craig is an angry young man. He has no control over his emotions, and his violent mood swings are wrecking his and his family's lives. He has a baby daughter whom he is not allowed to see and a home full of his latest obsession: reptiles.
Online
2002
82.

Locked in [electronic resource]: Coma

This episode tells the story of Joanne, who six years ago had a seizure. Since then she has been in a wakeful coma. Doctors believe Joanne is in a permanent vegetative state, awake but unaware, and that her smiles and reactions are simply reflexes. But her parents are not so sure. They worry that she might be "locked in": trapped inside an unresponsive body, hearing and understanding everything but unable to communicate. Her parents are convinced that she does respond to them and can blink on command. They decide to send their daughter to London to be tested by world experts at the Royal Hospital for neurodisability.
Online
2002
83.

Jean [electronic resource]: A Battle With Obsession

Jean Dobbie-Cunningham is a victim of obsessive behavior; she suffers from a touch obsession that dominates life for her and her family. The touch obsession is one of many symptoms of OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder), a common condition that can have serious consequences. Some victims of OCD have such time-consuming compulsions that it is difficult for them to hold a job or manage their families. Common compulsions are the continuous washing of hands or the checking and rechecking of ordinary actions like locking front doors. Some victims learn to control their compulsions, while others require professional attention. This film traces Jean's treatment at a psychiatric hospital and reports on its success two years later.
Online
1987
84.

The Man Who Lost His Body [electronic resource]

Twenty-five years ago, a young English butcher named Ian Waterman caught a virus that destroyed half his nervous system. He was left like a rag doll, with no sense of touch below the neck, and disorientation as to the use of his limbs unless they were actually in his field of vision. The doctors told him that he would never walk, feed himself, or dress himself again. Yet, as this inspiring documentary shows, against what seemed to be insurmountable odds, he has made an apparently miraculous recovery. How has he managed it? What does his story reveal about the extraordinary capacities of the human brain?
Online
1988
85.

Rachel's Brain [electronic resource]

This medical documentary tells the harrowing story of Rachel Mulkern, who has suffered from a rare and extremely severe form of epilepsy. Throughout her life she has tried to deal with the overwhelming effects of her condition. As we look in on her, we discover that she is faced with as many as five debilitating fits a day. In addition, she is becoming increasingly violent. At a loss to find any effective treatment, her parents have come to the conclusion that her only hope will involve a radical approach: an operation to open her skull and remove half her brain. This documentary follows the surgery and its extraordinary aftermath.
Online
1999
86.

Broken Images [electronic resource]

This classic Horizon program looks at two patients suffering from a rare form of brain damage known as visual agnosia. The illness prevents sufferers from recognizing even familiar faces and everyday objects. Since brain lesions are implicated in agnosia, there currently is no direct treatment for the condition. Patients face so many challenging situations in everyday living that they may not be able to hold jobs or even relate properly to members of their own families. However, with time and training they may be able to make use of their other senses - taste, touch, smell, and hearing - to cope with their devastating loss of visual acuity.
Online
1987
87.

The Brain [electronic resource]

In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts examines the body's most complex organ, the brain, and discovers how it can be trained to improve memory function. She meets a rugby fanatic and primary school teacher who has trouble remembering the names of his 27 pupils; he thinks this is caused by the concussions he has received playing his sport. Dr. Roberts invites him to her lab. They seek to learn more about the brain's remarkable powers of memory courtesy of Dominic O'Brien, eight times world memory champion. Dr. Roberts also discovers how sleep deprivation affects the brain and sets out to discover whether getting a good night's sleep can help people lose weight.
Online
2007
88.

The Parkinson's Enigma [electronic resource]

Using the illness of Michael J. Fox as a springboard, this program theorizes that most Parkinson's cases are the result not of heredity but of viral attacks and environmental toxins that severely damage the substantia nigra, the "gearbox of the brain." Fox, Oliver Sacks, neurologists from The Parkinson's Institute and The University of British Columbia, and others share insights drawn from their knowledge of Parkinson's, encephalitis lethargica, Guam disease, and MPTP poisoning that, taken together, make a compelling argument for linking Parkinson's to neuronal trauma. Therapies involving neuronal grafting from fetal tissue, retinal pigmented epithelial cell implantation, and transplantation of adult stem cells are discussed as well.
Online
2005; 2002
89.

Learning About Multiple Sclerosis [electronic resource]

This program introduces the subject of multiple sclerosis, covering onset, short- and long-term physiological effects, and treatment. A pair of patients with relapsing-remitting MS describe their experiences while the late Lawrence Jacobs, a pioneer in MS research and treatment, and other MS experts emphasize the benefits of early identification and intervention in managing this autoimmune disease. Diagnostics involving MRI scans, pharmaceutical treatment with the "ABC drugs" and Rebif, and physical therapy are also discussed, rounding out this comprehensive overview.
Online
2005; 2001
90.

Multiple Sclerosis [electronic resource]: Attacking the Nervous System

Until a cure for MS is discovered, medical science is doing all it can to help people delay the onset of MS and manage its symptoms so they can continue living physically active lives. In this program, Jerry Wolinsky and Staley Brod, of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and patients with primary-progressive and relapsing-remitting MS share their insights. After summarizing the disease's pathology, the program spotlights treatment using Copaxone and Novantrone, demonstrates the importance of patient support groups, and considers the possibility that environmental factors can trigger MS in people with a genetic predisposition to it.
Online
2005; 2002
91.

Learning About Tuberous Sclerosis [electronic resource]

Tuberous sclerosis is a disorder that produces invasive lesions on the kidneys, brain, and other vital organs as a result of genetic mutations. Although the lesions are usually benign, they may causes disturbances ranging from mild learning disorders to seizures and autism. In this program pediatric specialists discuss the symptoms of tuberous sclerosis, which usually first appear in childhood, and explain the genetic science behind the disease's development. In addition, parents of young patients describe their families' experiences with TS and the treatment options available.
Online
2012
92.

Restless Legs Syndrome [electronic resource]: An Uncontrollable Urge to Move

Kendra is one of millions of individuals who can't sleep due to uncomfortable sensations in their legs. Often triggered by pregnancy or anemia, restless legs syndrome is not life-threatening, but the sleep deprivation that results can take a heavy toll. In this program, patients with restless legs syndrome describe their symptoms and how they coped before finding a medication that worked for them. Viewers also learn the four main symptoms doctors use to diagnose RLS, and clinical experts explain the role of the dopamine system in this neurosensory motor disorder.
Online
2012
93.

Catching a Killer [electronic resource]: Preventing Meningococcal Disease

Meningococcal disease has a well-deserved fearsome reputation. It can cause a lethal form of bacterial meningitis as well as septic shock, and is capable of striking quickly-often without warning-leaving patients dead or seriously impaired in a matter of hours. This program gives an overview of meningococcal disease and the vaccines that are available to prevent it. Viewers meet a patient whose case wasn't discovered by the ER doctors who initially treated her, and then learn which telltale symptom prompted her new physician to begin lifesaving treatment. The video also provides tips on how to be proactive in the prevention of meningococcal disease.
Online
2011
94.

The Multiple Sclerosis Revolution [electronic resource]

While multiple sclerosis is relatively common, it remains a mysterious disease that can be difficult to detect early, and one which can leave its victims with lifelong, devastating consequences. Nearly 400,000 Americans live with MS and it is believed to affect as many as 2.5 million people worldwide. But recent breakthroughs in the understanding of MS have dramatically transformed the way the illness is viewed by the medical community. This program explains how new findings about multiple sclerosis are leading to the development of innovative treatments and the promise of a better life for patients.
Online
2012
95.

Stroke of Insight [electronic resource]: Jill Bolte Taylor

At the age of 37, Dr. Jill Bolte suffered a massive stroke that took eight years to recover from. This experience has informed her work as a neuroanatomist - a brain anatomy scientist - and led her to start Jill Bolte Taylor Brains, Inc. In this ABC News report, Dr. Bolte discusses her book My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Experience and what the stroke taught her about the workings of the human brain.
Online
2008
96.

Med-Free Migraine Relief [electronic resource]

Seven million Americans suffer from migraines, and 50 percent of them find no relief with available medications. This ABC News report investigates a new treatment that is showing some good results. TMS or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation sends a magnetic pulse into the brain to disrupt the electrical storm that precedes a migraine.
Online
2008
97.

Breaking the Wall of Brain Degeneration [electronic resource]: How Population Studies Can Help Prevent Neurodegenerative Diseases

Due to longer life expectancy and declining fertility rates, the proportion of the population aged over 60 is growing faster than any other age group. The success of public health policies and socioeconomic development has brought new relevance to neurological diseases that often accompany aging. Most of these ailments, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, cannot yet be prevented or cured. Too little is known about the factors that cause disease and those that sustain healthy brain aging. Monique Breteler - of DZNE in Bonn, the University of Bonn, and Harvard School of Public Health - has been leading international population studies in the causes and preclinical detection of neurodegenerative diseases for over 20 years. She was awarded the 2012 Bengt Winblad Lifetime Achi [...]
Online
2012
98.

Face Recognition [electronic resource]

Most of us are able to identify people we've met before and to pick out friends from among a group of strangers simply by scanning their faces. What cognitive processes allow us to do this? What goes on in the brain when we struggle to match a name to a face? And why are some people unable to remember the faces of individuals at all? This program explores facial perception and prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize what should be familiar faces is impaired. With commentary from renown prosopagnosia researcher Dr. Vicki Bruce, the video covers facial recognition, reading faces, facial blindness, and the Bruce-Young model of face perception.
Online
2013
99.

Alzheimer's Disease Level II [electronic resource]: For Assisted Living Facilities

A must-see for health care workers in assisted living facilities, this program teaches the various strategies professionals can use in managing Alzheimer's disease residents with patience and respect, while also taking steps to reduce their own stress levels. Meets Florida state requirements for Alzheimer's training. Designated for 4 contact hours of continuing nursing education.
Online
2011
100.

Alzheimer's Disease Level I [electronic resource]: Is It Delirium or Dementia? For Nursing Homes

Designed especially for nursing home personnel, this program explores several successful methods for dealing with residents who have an altered mental status. Using these methods, personnel will find their work easier and more rewarding - they will also be better able to calm the concerned family members of affected residents. Meets Florida state requirements for nursing home staff. Designated for 1 contact hour of continuing nursing education.
Online
2012