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Nervous System — Diseases
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61.

New Weapons to Fight Multiple Sclerosis [electronic resource]

Doctors and researchers have new tools to better identify, study, and treat the brain and spinal cord lesions that cause MS. This program enters an MRI lab and presents informative case studies as it reveals state-of-the-art developments in the battle against MS. Topics include the four types of MS, MRI diagnosis and monitoring, sclerotic scars, and cognitive rehabilitation. Viewers will also learn about the Epstein-Barr Trigger Theory, T- and B-cell immunology, genetic aspects of MS, and drugs to reduce the frequency and severity of MS symptoms-some FDA-approved, others still in development. Medical commentary is provided by doctors affiliated with the University at Buffalo (SUNY) and Florida International University.
Online
2009; 2008
62.

Dementia [electronic resource]: Treatments and Potential Cures

It can affect anyone, from night clerk to Nobel laureate. Physicians have identified more than 70 potential causes of irreversible mental deficiency, or dementia-which most often takes the form of Alzheimer's disease-and worldwide data indicate that its occurrence is on an upward trend. This program spotlights promising medical trials aimed at halting the mental and physiological tragedy of dementia. Linking the disease to organic neuronal damage, the film focuses on the development of medicines and vaccinations that could potentially cure it. Viewers are also introduced to therapeutic methods that make dementia less frightening and may help to relieve sufferers on the journey into a world devoid of memory.
Online
2009; 2007
63.

The Bridge at Midnight Trembles [electronic resource]: Parkinson's Disease and Deep Brain Stimulation

Diagnosed with Parkinson's in 1990, actor Richard Moir endured thirteen years of shakes, freezes, and depression as his career faded, his disease worsened, and various treatments achieved nothing. This program follows Moir as he prepares to undergo the procedure known as deep brain stimulation; it also documents his uncertain recovery period. Presenting photos and movie clips depicting the patient's personal experiences-including his first symptoms of Parkinson's-the film accompanies Moir as the day of his operation approaches, as he enters the hospital and readies for surgery, and afterwards as scars heal, hair grows back, and a degree of bodily control returns.
Online
2009; 2005
64.

Rays of Hope for the Brain [electronic resource]

How well do we understand the neurology of learning? Why does the brain's ability to learn diminish as we age? Can science find a way to extend brain "fitness," even for the very old? This program addresses those questions as it describes important medical experiments and studies. Topics include the central role of nerve cell connections in learning and cognitive development; cerebral plasticity, or the breakdown of unused connections; and growing evidence that plaque, diet, and poor blood circulation all "age" the brain. Tests at Germany's Max Planck Institute and the University of Zurich highlight comparisons between healthy and Alzheimer-afflicted brains while assessing the potential for an Alzheimer's vaccine.
Online
2009; 2005
65.

Parkinson's [electronic resource]: Great Drug Experiment

Once diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, most patients can expect a stable and active lifestyle for up to a decade-but new drugs could lengthen that period. This program follows five volunteers in the clinical trial of MitoQ, a medicine designed to slow the ailment's progress. Viewers are taken through the yearlong, double-blind placebo-controlled study, in which each volunteer performs a daily regimen of physical and mental exercise while his or her symptom progression is closely monitored. Interviews feature Dr. Barry Snow, the neurologist in charge of the trial, and Ken Taylor, CEO of Antipodean Pharmaceuticals, which makes and markets MitoQ.
Online
2009; 2008
66.

Sleep Disorders [electronic resource]

Over 40 million American adults suffer each year from a variety of chronic sleep problems, prompting extensive research into sleep patterns and potential obstacles to healthy sleep. This program explores sleep disorders, how they are diagnosed, and how they can be easily managed or treated. Viewers will learn how various disorders are usually classified into three major categories: lack of sleep, or insomnia; disturbed sleep, such as obstructive sleep apnea; and too much sleep, known as narcolepsy. Factors such as stress, biology, diet, and environment are overviewed. Several case studies and expert interviews are included.
Online
2007; 2006
67.

Living With Alzheimer's [electronic resource]

What is the difference between run-of-the-mill memory difficulties and the effects of Alzheimer's disease? If an older person is experiencing more "senior moments" than usual, should he or she be concerned? What happens inside the brain of an Alzheimer's patient? This program addresses those questions with the help of expert interviews and compelling case studies. Viewers will learn how the disease alters brain chemistry and leads to brain cell loss, and how it is typically diagnosed with cognitive tests and by studying patterns in a patient's history. Interviewees include Dr. Stephen Aronson of the University of Michigan Medical School and Dr. Marc Agronin of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Online
2007; 2006
68.

Narcolepsy [electronic resource]

At various moments throughout the day, people with narcolepsy experience a sudden urge to sleep. If the urge becomes overwhelming, they may sleep for periods lasting from a few seconds to several minutes. This program examines the chronic neurological disorder and its connection to the brain's inability to regulate the correct times for sleeping and waking. Illustrating the profoundly debilitating aspects of the condition-which makes basic activities like driving, typing, and even conversing with others extremely difficult-the program presents case studies and expert interviews. Dr. Richard Bogan of SleepMed and Dr. Todd Swick of the Houston Sleep Center are featured.
Online
2008; 2006
69.

Lou Gehrig's Disease [electronic resource]: Insights Into ALS

Although doctors don't know exactly what causes ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the last decade has brought new scientific insight into the disorder. This program follows the quest for better ALS treatments, assesses the possibility of a cure, and illustrates what life is like for ALS patients today. Dartmouth professor Dr. Elijah Stommel discusses the potential use of thalidomide to help prolong and improve lives, while Dr. Bonnie Gerecke of the UMD Medical Center and Dr. Pat Frieberg, former director of the ALS Association, also provide expertise. Case studies include a middle school teacher and a retired arts commissioner, both of whom have grappled with the anxiety and life changes ALS brings on.
Online
2009; 2007
70.

Braindamadj'd Take II [electronic resource]: Case Study in Recovery

Comatose after a car accident, Paul Nadler defied medical prognoses that he would never walk or talk again. This award-winning program illustrates his recovery from severe brain trauma and his return to a highly physical and creative lifestyle. Using the innovative visual approach Nadler developed as a television director, the film allows the artist to explain his frustrations and goals in his own unique manner while interweaving the commentary of friends, family, neurologists, and therapists. Nadler's ongoing difficulties with concentration, short-term memory, impulse control, and slurred speech are contrasted with his dogged insistence on snowboarding, rock climbing, video production, and stage acting. Contains harsh language.
Online
2008; 2006
71.

Tai Chi for Parkinson's Patients [electronic resource]

The health benefits of tai chi have made this ancient Chinese art a popular form of exercise, stress relief, and "moving meditation" in both the East and the West. This instructor-led video takes Parkinson's patients through a gentle tai chi workout with the specific purpose of combating the gradual loss of balance that accompanies Parkinson's disease. Beginning with a brief relaxation routine and the basic Hugging the Ball posture, these simplified tai chi moves bring mind and body into harmony. A comfortable blend of seated and standing exercises.
Online
2007
72.

Gentle Yoga for Parkinson's Patients [electronic resource]

This instructor-led video provides Parkinson's patients with a complete yoga workout that relies on stretching and strengthening to make the activities of daily living-sitting, standing, bending, twisting, reaching-easier and safer. Through a mix of seated and standing poses and exercises, the program stresses moving with intention while staying rooted in the "now." Also, deep cleansing breathing is emphasized via classic yogic techniques such as Victorious Breath, Lion's Breath, and Bellows Breath. "For our bodies we seek health and energy; for our minds, clarity and focus; and for our spirit, empowerment and inspiration." Namaste!
Online
2007
73.

Stroke Patient [electronic resource]: A Comprehensive Guide

Besides being the third leading cause of death in the United States, stroke is a major cause of disability-so rehabilitation care, while varying according to the extent of brain damage, is vital to any stroke patient. This program illustrates how an aneurysm impacts the mind and body and reveals practical approaches a nurse or health support specialist can take to counter the effects of stroke, which include language disorders such as aphasia and dysphagia; deficits in sight, hearing, and mobility; and extensive emotional complications. Viewers also learn about prevention against another stroke and helping patients resume a lifestyle that is as active, productive, and independent as possible.
Online
2010
74.

I Hear With My Eyes [electronic resource]

Julie loves the glorious colors associated with the sound of a rooster crowing, while Mandi remembers phone numbers by their hues. Until John read a newspaper article about synesthesia in later life, he thought that everyone saw the days of the week as various shades of blue. In this program people with synesthesia describe their experiences and perceptions, and the benefits and drawbacks of having a condition in which the barriers between the senses are dissolved. While it might seem like a psychedelic drug trip to the 96 percent of the population who don't have synesthesia, those who do report that "You don't go around saying, 'Oh, wow!'... it's just the way we perceive life.
Online
2011
75.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Jill Bolte Taylor, My Stroke of Insight

Is it possible to see an upside to having a stroke? It is if you're Jill Bolte Taylor. As a neuroanatomist, she studied her own stroke as it unfolded and has since become a powerful voice for the possibilities of post-stroke brain recovery. In this TEDTalk, Taylor relates what she experienced while having her stroke, what she terms the "stroke of insight" that followed her brain attack, and how the stroke has renewed and redirected her energies. An astonishing and uplifting story!
Online
2008
76.

The Brain and Food [electronic resource]: Secrets of Your Mind

The brain may be the control center of the human nervous system as well as the chief focus of neurological research, but its link with another organ-the stomach-is a topic of increasing interest and study. This ABC News program looks at the brain's complex relationship with food and its role in America's obesity epidemic. With help from sophisticated imaging techniques, viewers go inside an obese person's brain to see how it responds to fattening foods. Case studies include an overweight woman who has tried everything from diets to bariatric surgery to manage her constant eating compulsion and is now turning to brain surgery-the most radical weight loss procedure ever attempted. Another story features a woman with a disturbing form of somnambulism: she eats in her sleep. Does brain r [...]
Online
2010
77.

Innovative Approaches to Treating MS [electronic resource]

The Pacific Northwest has one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the world. In this program, the crew heads to Seattle to learn more about this mysterious and unpredictable illness, which can interfere with anything from muscle control to vision to concentration. While no one is sure what causes MS, researchers have determined how it inflicts its damage. This discovery has sparked exciting new strategies for slowing the progression of MS.
Online
2008
78.

Stopping a Stroke [electronic resource]: Limiting the Damage Done

Time lost is brain lost... when it comes to a stroke. That's an important concept, since stroke is a leading cause of disability in the United States; if not treated right away, a stroke can leave its victims disabled physically, mentally, and emotionally. As soon as a stroke occurs the clock starts ticking, and the sooner the person having a stroke can get medical attention the better the chance for a good outcome. This program takes a look at risk factors, symptoms and the various ways to intervene and limit the damage from a stroke. If administered promptly, clot-busting medications, and mechanical and surgical interventions are among the treatments that help patients make a full recovery.
Online
2011
79.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Michael Merzenich, Exploring the Rewiring of the Brain

Michael Merzenich studies neuroplasticity - the brain's powerful ability to change and adapt - and how we might make use of that plasticity to heal injured brains and enhance the skills in healthy ones. In this TEDTalk, Merzenich explores the brain's power to actively rewire itself and how science might one day harness that ability to confront disorders such as autism, cerebral palsy, dementia, and schizophrenia.
Online
2009
80.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Daniel Tammet, Different Ways of Knowing

Daniel Tammet has linguistic, numerical and visual synesthesia - meaning that his perception of words, numbers, and colors are woven together into a new way of perceiving and understanding the world. In this TEDTalk, the linguist, writer, and educator shares his art, his passion for languages, and a glimpse into his unique way of perceiving the world. Tammet is the author of Born on a Blue Day, about his life with high-functioning autistic savant syndrome, and runs the language-learning site Optimnem.
Online
2011