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Nervous System — Diseases
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41.

Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (Slipped Disk) [electronic resource]

The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place ("slipped disk").
Online
2004
42.

Athetosis Resulting From Basal Ganglia Injury [electronic resource]

Athetosis, or constant writhing movements, is often caused by injury to deeply situated structures within the brain called the basal ganglia.
Online
2004
43.

Athetosis Resulting From Basal Ganglia Injury [electronic resource]

Athetosis, or constant writhing movements, is often caused by injury to deeply situated structures within the brain called the basal ganglia.
Online
2004
44.

Alzheimer's Disease [electronic resource]

In a person with Alzheimer's disease, neurofibrillary tangles and plaques develop, causing both structural and chemical problems in the brain. Alzheimer's disease appears to disconnect areas of the brain that normally work together.
Online
2004
45.

Alzheimer's Disease [electronic resource]

In a person with Alzheimer's disease, neurofibrillary tangles and plaques develop, causing both structural and chemical problems in the brain. Alzheimer's disease appears to disconnect areas of the brain that normally work together.
Online
2004
46.

Concussion [electronic resource]

In a severe impact to the head, the brain moves and hits the skull, causing injury. During a boxing match, the brain moves from side to side after the impact of a punch. Following a concussion head injury, confusion and disorientation due to temporary distortion of the brain may result.
Online
2004
47.

Parkinson's Disease [electronic resource]

In Parkinson's disease, dopamine production becomes irregular and inadequate and nerve cells cannot properly transmit messages. This results in the loss of muscle function. By providing an even, adequate supply of medication that the body converts into dopamine, neurons are able to transmit messages and tremors improve.
Online
2004
48.

Parkinson's Disease [electronic resource]

In Parkinson's disease, dopamine production becomes irregular and inadequate and nerve cells cannot properly transmit messages. This results in the loss of muscle function. By providing an even, adequate supply of medication that the body converts into dopamine, neurons are able to transmit messages and tremors improve.
Online
2004
49.

Stroke [electronic resource]

A stroke may occur if an embolism travels from another part of the body and lodges within an artery in the brain. When an internal arterial wall becomes damaged, various types of emboli can form, such as one derived from platlets, thrombotic, cholesterol, or mixed. In this example, an embolism is formed in the internal carotid artery, breaks loose, travels towards the brain, and lodges in a cerebral artery. The blocked artery deprives the brain of oxygen, damaging the surrounding brain tissue. The result is a stroke.
Online
2004
50.

Stroke [electronic resource]

A stroke may occur if an embolism travels from another part of the body and lodges within an artery in the brain. When an internal arterial wall becomes damaged, various types of emboli can form, such as one derived from platlets, thrombotic, cholesterol, or mixed. In this example, an embolism is formed in the internal carotid artery, breaks loose, travels towards the brain, and lodges in a cerebral artery. The blocked artery deprives the brain of oxygen, damaging the surrounding brain tissue. The result is a stroke.
Online
2004
51.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Alanna Shaikh - How I'm Preparing to Get Alzheimer's

When faced with a parent suffering from Alzheimer's, most of us respond with denial ("It won't happen to me") or extreme efforts at prevention. But global health expert and TED Fellow Alanna Shaikh sees it differently. In this TEDTalk, she lists three concrete steps she is taking to prepare for the moment - should it arrive - when she herself gets Alzheimer's disease.
Online
2012
52.

The Toughest Break [electronic resource]: Christopher Reeve on Spinal Cord Injury

This remarkable program, hosted and narrated by Christopher Reeve, records Martin Schmieg's odyssey of despair and triumph. From the truck crash that broke his neck, to his fight for life in an acute care spinal ward, to his courageous struggle to transcend his injury, Martin's story is counterpointed by details of Reeve's own experiences. In addition, the documentary showcases new technologies to enhance mobility and presents research by some of the world's leading scientists-including the work of Dr. Lars Olson, who succeeded in enabling rodents with severed spinal cords to walk.
Online
2010; 1997
53.

Voices of Lupus [electronic resource]

This inspiring program uses strong, positive role models to show how women afflicted with lupus can help themselves through peer group support and better communication with their physicians and families. This autoimmune disease affects more than half a million women from diverse social, cultural, and economic backgrounds. Interviews with patients and physicians demonstrate positive strategies that can help people with lupus, their families, and their physicians to cope better with this painful, unpredictable illness.
Online
2008; 1992
54.

Leaded Gasoline [electronic resource]: Trading IQ for Octane

As a gasoline additive, lead suppresses engine knock. Lead is also a well-known poison, and yet during the 1920s it was championed over safer alternatives-and even backed by the U.S. surgeon general. Why? This program presents the history of leaded gasoline and its impact on human health and intelligence, most notably as documented in Herbert Needleman's controversial study of schoolchildren. Professor Needleman is featured, along with Bill Kovarik, of Radford University; Philippe Grandjean, of the University of Southern Denmark; and Angela Mathee, of the Medical Research Council, Johannesburg.
Online
2006; 2005
55.

Insomnia [electronic resource]

An inability to sleep is far more than a nuisance-it's a genuine health problem. This program examines insomnia from a medical perspective, exploring the physical, emotional, and psychological aspects of the disorder. Interviews with doctors who specialize in treating sleep difficulties provide historical background on the affliction, the personal and professional hazards it can present, and dietary and behavioral adjustments that can improve the quality of sleep. The advent of safe and effective sleep medications is also described in detail, while observations from patients who have overcome insomnia provide a reassuring human dimension to the discussion.
Online
2007; 2004
56.

Epilepsy [electronic resource]: New Outlook

Feared and misunderstood for centuries, epilepsy is now a completely manageable condition for many patients. This program overviews newly developed treatments that have greatly reduced, and for some people eliminated, the occurrence of epileptic seizures. It also presents case studies suggesting that the disabling prejudice which has traditionally surrounded epilepsy is fading-and that it no longer inhibits employment, an active lifestyle, or pregnancy. Neurological and drug-related information is provided by Dr. Barry Gidal of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dr. Martha Morrell of Columbia University, who focuses on the special issues women with epilepsy face.
Online
2006; 2005
57.

Aspects of MS [electronic resource]

While the cause of multiple sclerosis remains unknown, knowledge of how MS attacks the body is improving. This program outlines what happens to the central nervous system and its myelin nerve sheaths when a patient suffers from MS; describes how movement, memory, and vision can be impaired; and examines recently developed medicines that can slow the advance of the disease. Identifying areas of study that may yield important MS clues-including gender differences, genetic factors, and environmental triggers such as viral or bacterial infection-the program incorporates expert commentary from Dr. Richard Rudick of Cleveland Clinic and Dr. Patricia O'Looney, director of biomedical research at the National MS Society.
Online
2006; 2003
58.

Memory Masters [electronic resource]: How Savants Store Information

Reudiger Gamm performs complex arithmetic instantly and without help-his brain stores numbers like a calculator. Orlando Sorrel remembers exactly what he was doing on any date, at any hour, and can accurately predict the day of the week thousands of years in the future. Kim Peek-the original "Rain Man"-has read 12,000 books and hasn't forgotten a single word. What lies behind these astonishing abilities? This program explores recent research into the vast mental capacities of so-called savants. Studying brain structure and other important neurological factors, the film also examines why savants often lack basic interpersonal and survival skills.
Online
2006
59.

Taking on Tourette [electronic resource]: Families Reveal Their Personal Struggles

Secluded in upstate New York, a facility known as Camp Tic-a-Palooza welcomes young people with Tourette Syndrome. This ABC News program profiles several camp attendees, focusing on the challenges, triumphs, and emotional impact of living with TS. Ten-year-old Sid's symptoms include frequently sticking out his middle finger. Amanda displays a menagerie of vocal tics, often hissing, barking, or roaring at others. More troubling are 13-year-old Isabella's self-injurious tics, which obscure her sweet spirit and creativity. With perspective from family members and video diaries, the program also includes commentary from Dr. Jonathan Mink, Co-Chair of the TSA Scientific Advisory Board, and Dr. Jerome Bubrick, Clinical Instructor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine.
Online
2009; 2008
60.

Preventing a Stroke [electronic resource]

A major stroke can hit without warning and leave a broken body and a damaged mind in its wake. But there are ways to prevent strokes, even among high-risk groups. This program looks at anticoagulation and its role in averting strokes and other devastating conditions. Viewers learn how doctors identify risk factors in patients and how certain treatments can stop blood clots from forming and making their way to the brain. Subjects include ischemic strokes, intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages, blood clot formation, DVT, stroke symptoms, treatments by type of stroke, anti-thrombotic therapy, and telestroke. Commentary comes from Dr. Mark Alberts and Dr. Robert Bonow of Northwestern University.
Online
2009; 2008