You searched for:

Subject
:
Nervous System — Diseases
x
105 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
21.

Cerebral Palsy [electronic resource]

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance and posture. The disorders appear in the first few years of life. Usually they do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have trouble with tasks such as writing or using scissors. Some have other medical conditions, including seizure disorders or mental impairment.
Online
2011
22.

Cluster Headache [electronic resource]

A cluster headache is one-sided head pain that may involve tearing of the eyes and a stuffy nose. Attacks occur regularly for 1 week to 1 year, separated by long pain-free periods that last at least 1 month, possibly longer.
Online
2011
23.

Concussion (in English) [electronic resource]

In a severe impact to the head, the brain moves and hits the skull, causing injury. During a boxing match, the brain moves from side to side after the impact of a punch. Following a concussion head injury, confusion and disorientation due to temporary distortion of the brain may result.
Online
2004
24.

Seizures [electronic resource]

Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures, and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain.
Online
2011
25.

What Are Night Terrors? [electronic resource]

Night terrors. What are they and what do you do about them? I'm Dr. Alan Greene, and I want to discuss this common childhood issue with you called night terrors, or sometimes 'confusional arousals' in some of the parenting books. What happens is a young child sometime shortly after bedtime will sit upright, open their eyes, start screaming, not recognize their parents, and seem extraordinarily frightened. What's going on? Well it turns out that they are not having a nightmare. They're not actually afraid of anything conscious that they can remember and they're not awake. They're actually stuck between different stages of sleep and have this big adrenaline rush that is causing all of these behaviors with no conscious thought going with it at all. Now the typical idea of what you shoul [...]
Online
2011
26.

Zoonotic Viruses [electronic resource]

Rabies, Lyme disease, West Nile virus-all are examples of zoonosis, an infection that can be transmitted to humans from animals. In this program, several experts discuss major zoonotic diseases of concern, as well as outline safety tips for both people and pets. Dr. Wendy Walker, president of the Maryland Veterinary Medical Association; Joe Conlon, medical entomologist with the American Mosquito Control Association; and Dr. Michael Zimring, director of the Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Baltimore's Mercy Medical Center, talk about risk factors, symptoms, prevention, and treatment.
Online
2010; 2007
27.

Don't Forget [electronic resource]

In this episode of Scientific American Frontiers, host Alan Alda investigates how people create memories and how, as we age, the act of remembering becomes slippery and elusive-sometimes vanishing forever, either because of Alzheimer's disease or as a result of other neurological disorders. Alda visits two men who live entirely in the present or the distant past, unable to recall events that happened even a few minutes ago. He also meets a volunteer in an experimental treatment for Alzheimer's and examines the search for an Alzheimer's vaccine.
Online
2004
28.

Wipe Out [electronic resource]: The Silent Epidemic of Brain Injury

From the cold-blooded standpoint of statistics, one might expect the leading health threat for men under 35 to be alcohol, drug abuse, or gang violence. Instead, it is head trauma - often brought about by addictive physical risk-taking. This program tells the story of three young men living with permanent brain damage from injuries suffered in extreme sports. Chris Dufficy, a professional snowboarder, struggles with ongoing memory problems. Jon Gocer planned to follow in Chris's tracks until a skateboard wipe-out erased much of his memory. And Chris Tutin's dreams are a shadow of what they used to be - his cerebellum was crushed in a dirt-bike accident. Together, these case studies offer valuable insight into what many doctors call an invisible epidemic.
Online
2008
29.

Back to Full Stride [electronic resource]: Knee Replacement Surgery

Bob had been a lifelong athlete until knee trouble began to keep him off the basketball court. Like millions of aging but still active adults, he confronted the pain when it started restricting his daily activities, too. This program examines deterioration of the knee joint and the options for partial or total replacement when nonsurgical interventions fail to bring relief. Medical experts outline the basics of the procedure along with its risks, stressing the importance of sticking to a post-operative rehabilitation plan. In addition, a hiker discusses her decision to have surgery-now much less invasive than when the procedure was first developed-and how it eventually improved her life.
Online
2010
30.

Epilepsy Defined [electronic resource]

Simply stated, epilepsy is an electrical storm in the brain - but that definition is the only thing that is simple about epilepsy, a vastly complex mental disorder. This program uses case studies of two boys, 9 and 16, and a 10-year-old girl as a starting point for creating a broadly inclusive definition of epilepsy that references febrile seizures, partial and complex seizures, generalized seizures, tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures, status seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. In addition, medical specialists discuss causes of epilepsy, typical ages of onset, diagnosis methods, and a spectrum of treatments that includes ketogenic nutrition, medications, vagal nerve stimulation, and brain surgery.
Online
2007
31.

Understanding Fibromyalgia [electronic resource]

Often mistaken for a psychological problem, fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that manifests as memory problems, sleep disturbances, and bowel and bladder irritability, along with the more commonly known symptom of pain throughout the body. In this program experts discuss how patients can be diagnosed, explain the possible causes of fibromyalgia, and identify the lifestyle changes and treatment methods that can assist those who have the condition to get their lives back on track. Dr. Daniel Clauw of the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center and Lynne Matallana of the National Fibromyalgia Association are featured.
Online
2008
32.

Coping With Restless Legs Syndrome [electronic resource]

Aching, pulling, searing, tingling, crawling-these are a few of the terms people with restless legs syndrome use to describe the condition's unpleasant sensations. But the major complaint of many RLS patients is how it interferes with their sleep, creating a domino effect that severely impacts work, relationships, and mental and physical health. In this program viewers learn what a bout of RLS feels like, what triggers an episode, who is at risk, and how the disorder is treated. Dr. David Rye, a professor of neurology and an RLS patient himself, discusses the ongoing search for the cause and cure of this common, yet underdiagnosed, condition.
Online
2008
33.

Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders III (for Home Health) [electronic resource]

Care for people with Alzheimer's disease is aimed at enhancing quality of life and maximizing functional performance by improving cognition, mood, and behavior. This program for home health care providers discusses effective communication with patients who have Alzheimer's disease or related disorders; behavior management; maximization of daily function; and development of the interpersonal skills needed in working with family members and other caregivers. Meets State Requirements for Home Health Personnel in Florida. Designated for 2 contact hours of continuing nursing education.
Online
2010
34.

Rett [electronic resource]: There Is Hope - Case Studies, Family Portraits, and the Search for a Cure

Striking mostly girls under the age of 18 months, Rett syndrome is one of the most debilitating and frightening disorders on the autism spectrum. Its symptoms include seizures, recurrent infections, developmental delay, and absent to minimal speech. Its victims usually live into adulthood and require round-the-clock care. But increased attention to Rett has intensified research efforts as well as a greater sense of community and support among those affected by the disorder. This program focuses on families coping with Rett's daily realities - the constant stress of caregiving, the emotional impact on parents, and the perspectives on health and happiness that emerge when one realizes what a Rett patient must go through.The film also follows the work of scientists searching for the gen [...]
Online
2012
35.

Epilepsy [electronic resource]

Epilepsy is a brain disorder in which a person has repeated seizures (convulsions) over time. Seizures are episodes of disturbed brain activity that cause changes in attention or behavior. Epilepsy occurs when permanent changes in brain tissue cause the brain to be too excitable or jumpy. Epilepsy may be due to a medical condition or injury that affects the brain, or the cause may be unknown (idiopathic).
Online
2011
36.

Head Injury [electronic resource]

Head injuries can range from a minor bump on the head to a devastating brain injury. Common causes of head injury include traffic accidents, falls, physical assault, and accidents at home, at work, outdoors, or while playing sports.
Online
2011
37.

Migraine [electronic resource]

A migraine is a common type of headache that may occur with symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light. In many people, a throbbing pain is felt only on one side of the head. Some people who get migraines have warning symptoms, called an aura, before the actual headache begins. An aura is a group of symptoms, including vision disturbances, that are a warning sign that a bad headache is coming.
Online
2011
38.

Tension Headache [electronic resource]

A tension headache is pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck, usually associated with muscle tightness in these areas. Tension headaches are one of the most common forms of headaches. They may occur at any age, but are most common in adults and adolescents.
Online
2011
39.

Edith and Michel [electronic resource]: Coping With Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease is a form of dementia that gets worse over time, gradually affecting memory, thinking, and behavior. This fascinating documentary explores the mystery of Alzheimer's and examines whether or not it is a case of survival or acceptance. Join Michel Moreau, who suffers from a severe case of Alzheimer's, and his wife and companion, Edith Fournier, as they navigate the many uncertainties associated with the disease. In this film, Edith gives viewers a glimpse of their severely disrupted lives while showing how their personal inner transformations enable love and life to triumph over isolation and illness.
Online
2004
40.

Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (Slipped Disk) [electronic resource]

The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place ("slipped disk").
Online
2004