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Music — Instruction and Study
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101.

Keyboard and Percussion [electronic resource]

A close look at such rarities as the dulcimer and the hurdy-gurdy, as well as better-known instruments like the organ, harpsichord, and kettledrums.
Online
2008; 1976
102.

Brass Instruments [electronic resource]

The development of brass instruments from the lowly cow horn. Although trumpet fanfares and brass bands are relatively recent in the history of music, even the bone or wooden ancestors of the trumpet were associated with royalty, pomp, or war. David Munrow explains how pitch variations are achieved with these brasses.
Online
2008; 1976
103.

Handel's Messiah [electronic resource]

This is a performance of the Messiah in the original scoring, performed as Handel intended it, with much smaller resources than we have become accustomed to and, therefore, a perfect balance between a small chorus and orchestra. Roger Norrington conducts the London Baroque Players (comprising leading specialists in 17th- and 18th-century instrumental practice), the Cardiff (Wales) Polyphonic Choir, and soloists Norma Burrowes, Helen Watts, Robert Tear, and Willard White.
Online
2007; 1982
104.

Mozart [electronic resource]: Overture to "The Marriage of Figaro

Using Mozart's lively operatic piece, this program illustrates how composers weave together musical ideas to bring contrast and texture to their music. Abrupt pizzicatos, resounding fanfares, and languid melodies presented as a series of quick edits illustrate the point, along with an uninterrupted playback of a portion of the Overture.
Online
2007; 1996
105.

Milhaud [electronic resource]: Boeuf Sur le Toit

In this program, the orchestra uses lighthearted cafe music from the Milhaud ballet set in a Paris nightclub to illustrate how the use of various keys adds color to the musical landscape. Different instruments, performing the pieces in major and minor keys, give listeners a firsthand glimpse into how key changes add interest to music.
Online
2006; 1996
106.

Bass Instruments [electronic resource]

This program discusses the instruments in the bass section of an orchestra-particularly the double bass. We see how the double bass, originally developed as an accompanying instrument, was used more prominently by such musical notables as double bass virtuoso and conductor Serge Kussevitzky-mentor of the late Leonard Bernstein. Music by Haydn and others illustrates the use of other bass instruments, including the tuba, bass cornet, serpent, ophicleide, bass saxophone, and bass horn.
Online
2007; 1997
107.

Brazil [electronic resource]: Priestesses, Samba Dancers, and Mulattos of Brazil

This program discusses the lives of two groups of women-the women of northern Bahia and the mulattos of Rio de Janeiro-both descendants of African slaves. In Bahia, voodoo religious practices are revealed, as well as the problems of prostitution and AIDS. In Rio, the program examines the tradition of carnaval and the role of female mulatto samba dancers as sex objects.
Online
2006; 1992
108.

George Frideric Handel [electronic resource]

Handel always knew how to succeed. His Italian operas took London by storm, but when the public rejected music in foreign languages he gave them the oratorio in English. And when the Royal Academy of Music folded, Handel revived it under a scheme of subscriptions and box-office receipts and modern theater was born. This program traces Handel's distinguished career, focusing on his great output of operas and oratorios, the most famous of which is his Messiah. Musical directors Christophe Rousset and William Christie discuss his innovations. A wide range of his music is sampled, including Dixit Dominus, Water Music, Rinaldo, Julius Caesar, Royal Fireworks Music, Solomon, and Concerto for Organ No. 5, Op. 4, as well as "Fammi Cambaterre" from Orlando, as sung by Felicity Palmer.
Online
2005; 1998
109.

Frederic Chopin [electronic resource]

Inspired by Paganini's dedication to a soloist instrument, the violin, Chopin decided early in his career to write only for piano. This beautifully produced program presents a biography of the Polish-born child prodigy and composer who blended Slavic influences into his works. Sketches, paintings, and cinematic treatments of Chopin and his times complement the music. Archival footage includes Arthur Rubinstein, Alexis Weissenberg, and Byron Janis discussing Chopin's genius, as well as numerous excerpts of historical performances by Rubinstein, Janis, Victoria Postnikova, Witold Malcuzynski, Martha Argerich, and Samson Francois.
Online
2005; 1998
110.

Giuseppe Verdi [electronic resource]

Considered the greatest of all opera composers, Verdi was a zealous nationalist who wrote his music not to please critics or the aristocracy but to entertain the masses. Known for his soaring arias and unforgettable melodies, his goal was to infuse dramatic power into opera. With paintings, photos, and extensive musical excerpts, this program looks at the life and enduring works of Verdi. Opera and stage directors Gerard Mortier and Lucchino Visconti discuss his contributions to the art. Featured recordings include Luciano Pavarotti performing in Rigoletto; Sir George Solti conducting Falstaff; Herbert von Karajan conducting Messa da Requiem and Otello; and selections from Don Carlo, La Traviata, Aida, Nabucco, and Macbeth.
Online
2007; 1998
111.

Tsugaru Shamisen [electronic resource]: World of Michihiro Sato

Michihiro Sato is considered the finest player of the Tsugaru shamisen, a traditional three-stringed instrument of the Tsugaru province integral to Japanese folk music. This program combines live performances by Sato at the Otsu Traditional Performing Arts Center with the musician's commentary on the history and role of the shamisen player, a door-to-door minstrel of a bygone era. Sato also discusses the future of Tsugaru shamisen, such as his work with jazz and avant-garde musicians in America and Europe.
Online
2006; 2000
112.

Shozan Tanabe [electronic resource]: Sound of Silence

The shakuhachi, a kind of wooden flute, was introduced to Japan sometime between the 8th and 12th centuries and was used in court music as well as in Buddhist monasteries as a vehicle for enlightenment. This program features performances and discussion by Shozan Tanabe, one of Japan's most recognized players of the shakuhachi. Along with recordings of his music, Tanabe talks about the history of this instrument so often associated with the "sound of Japan.
Online
2006; 2000
113.

Koto [electronic resource]: Praise on Strings

Hideaki Kuribayashi was a disciple of koto legend Tadao Sawai and is considered the finest living player of this traditional Japanese stringed instrument. In this program, interviews with Kuribayashi are intercut with performances from his concerts in Nagano and Kyoto in 2000. Kuribayashi comments on the history and art of koto music and discusses the creation of his own original musical compositions.
Online
2005; 2002
114.

Mythical Tunes of Biwa [electronic resource]: Yoshiko Sakata

The biwa, a pear-shaped, wooden lute, is played using a triangular plectrum. With no structured tuning, the instrument is adjusted to complement the player's voice, allowing for a highly personalized music. This program showcases the sounds of one of Japan's oldest stringed instruments through performances by Yoshiko Sakata, a noted biwa player and composer who plays both traditional songs and original compositions.
Online
2006; 2003
115.

Trio Solisti Explores Beethoven [electronic resource]

In this program, the Trio Solisti practice, interpret, and perform two of Beethoven's piano trios, the "Archduke" Trio and the "Ghost" Trio. Pianist Jon Klibonoff, cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach, and violinist Maria Bachmann discuss the challenges of transforming the composer's score on paper into a vibrant performance. Footage of their work sessions in the studio is mixed with highlights of their concert before a live audience.
Online
2006; 2002
116.

Duke Robillard Volume 1 [electronic resource]: Guitar Method

In this program, Duke Robillard teaches rhythm guitar ideas and chord progressions. He demonstrates his favorite Chicago blues turnarounds, the best chord voicings to use in blues, mixing double stops with chords for interesting backgrounds behind solos, sliding sixth chords, guitar boogie rhythms, expressive picking techniques, and more! Inspired by blues legends like T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian, and Big Joe Turner, Duke's guitar work has seamlessly spanned the worlds of jazz, blues, and swing since he founded his renowned big band, Roomful of Blues, in 1967. Duke has toured internationally with his band and also as Tom Waits's guitarist and Jimmie Vaughan's replacement in The Fabulous Thunderbirds. He has recorded 20 acclaimed solo albums, including Grammy-nominated Guitar Gro [...]
Online
2009
117.

Discover Dance Combinations the Waltz Series 2 [electronic resource]

Simon and Heidi Cruwys, former U.K. professional ballroom champions provide the best step-by-step instructions to teach you a series of three stylish waltz combinations. Each of these combinations will be taught in three clear stages. Stage 1: Each step within the combination can be practiced individually with detailed instructions. Each step will be repeated slowly three times. Stage 2: The steps will now be practiced together in sequence as they appear in the full combination. The step sequence will be repeated six times. Stage 3: Finally, the whole combination is practiced to music at a realistic pace. The combination will be repeated six times. You'll be the envy of friends and family in no time!
Online
2008
118.

Bill Frisell [electronic resource]: Solos-the Jazz Sessions

An up-close portrayal of Bill Frisell filmed by Daniel Berman at the Berkeley Church in Toronto. This rare solo session features an intimate look into his electric guitar and looping wizardry and includes an exclusive interview with Frisell. On the taping of Solos: The Jazz Sessions, Frisell comments, "It's a weird thing playing solo. I live for the interaction with other musicians because when you put something out there, you get something in return, and you are able to build momentum. When you perform solo, it just goes out into space, and you have to come up with ideas right away to follow it up. I learned to allow silence when playing by myself. There's really something special about one person sitting and playing guitar. I'm really happy with how this project turned out. Daniel [...]
Online
2011
119.

Discover Dance Combinations the Cha Cha Cha Series 2 [electronic resource]

Simon and Heidi Cruwys, former U.K. professional ballroom champions provide the best step-by-step instructions to teach you a series of three stylish cha cha cha combinations. Each of these combinations will be taught in three clear stages. Stage 1: Each step within the combination can be practiced individually with detailed instructions. Each step will be repeated slowly three times. Stage 2: The steps will now be practiced together in sequence as they appear in the full combination. The step sequence will be repeated six times. Stage 3: Finally, the whole combination is practiced to music at a realistic pace. The combination will be repeated six times. You'll be the envy of friends and family in no time!
Online
2008
120.

Charlie Hunter [electronic resource]: Solos-the Jazz Sessions

Charlie Hunter has recorded 17 albums that highlight his guitar skills. Proficient on five, seven and eight string guitars, Hunter has been referred to as the undisputed master of the 8-string guitar. The material in this special set, recorded in the historic Berkeley Church in Toronto, Canada, and filmed for Solos: The Jazz Sessions, make it bear repeated viewing.
Online
2011