You searched for:

Subject
:
Musculoskeletal System — Diseases
x
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
21.

One Small Step [electronic resource]: SuperDoctors

The final episode in this series follows the career of orthopedic surgeon Steve Mannion, who travels to Malawi and opens several clinics for children and adults with clubfeet. As many as two children per 1,000 are born with this deformity, and surgery had always been the accepted treatment. Since he was the only surgeon for the seven million people in the northern area of the country, Dr. Mannion realized he would never have the time to treat all his patients. Thus he introduced a nonsurgical solution suitable for his staff to perform: a type of physiotherapy called the Ponseti treatment. This program tells the story of Dr. Mannion's struggle to overcome tradition and establish his new approach to treating clubfeet.
Online
2008
22.

Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (Slipped Disk) [electronic resource]

The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place ("slipped disk").
Online
2004
23.

Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (Slipped Disk) [electronic resource]

The disks between the vertebrae are liable to displacement when put under strain. Heavy lifting may produce forces which cause a lumbar intervertebral disk to move out of place ("slipped disk").
Online
2004
24.

Gout [electronic resource]

Gout is caused by increased production of uric acid. Uric acid crystals travel and accumulate in the joints, especially in the feet and legs, causing great pain and swelling.
Online
2004
25.

Gout [electronic resource]

Gout is caused by increased production of uric acid. Uric acid crystals travel and accumulate in the joints, especially in the feet and legs, causing great pain and swelling.
Online
2004
26.

Shoulder Joint Dislocation [electronic resource]

A shoulder dislocation usually occurs as a result of force to a joint. The bone is pushed out of the socket, which may cause damage to the surrounding ligaments, tendons, and nerves.
Online
2004
27.

Shoulder Joint Dislocation [electronic resource]

A shoulder dislocation usually occurs as a result of force to a joint. The bone is pushed out of the socket, which may cause damage to the surrounding ligaments, tendons, and nerves.
Online
2004
28.

Bunion [electronic resource]

Bunions are usually caused by prolonged pressure put on the feet that compresses the big toe and pushes it toward the second toe. Over time, the condition may become painful as extra bone grows where the base of the big toe meets the foot.
Online
2004
29.

Bunion [electronic resource]

Bunions are usually caused by prolonged pressure put on the feet that compresses the big toe and pushes it toward the second toe. Over time, the condition may become painful as extra bone grows where the base of the big toe meets the foot.
Online
2004
30.

Ankle Ligament Injury [electronic resource]

While playing basketball, this player sprained his ankle. Probably not a good idea to play without shoes! Symptoms of a sprain include swelling and discoloration near the affected area. A sprain occurs when a ligament is inflamed or torn. Ligaments, such as those of the ankle, are bands or sheets of regular, tough, fibrous tissue that connect bones together. Here is the normal state of the ankle and its ligaments. Depending on the severity of the injury, the ligaments may be mildly injured and inflamed as in a type one ankle sprain; partially torn, classified as a type two sprain; or completely torn, making it a type three sprain. Treatment for a type one sprain should include rest, ice, compression and immobilization, and elevation of the affected area. This is easy to remember if y [...]
Online
2010
31.

Osteoarthritis [electronic resource]

Osteoarthritis is a joint disorder resulting from wear and tear and inflammation. Symptoms include loss of flexibility and pain and swelling within joints. The disorder results from injury to the cartilage, which normally absorbs stress and covers the bones so they can move smoothly. Some older people's cartilage is worn away, causing pain from bone spurs that restricts movement.
Online
2010
32.

Osteoporosis [electronic resource]

Many older women and some older men suffer from osteoporosis, a condition in which bone mass loss is greater than normally occurs with aging. Osteoporotic bone is shaped like normal bone but calcium loss causes the inside to be more porous and spongy. Osteoporosis makes bones more likely to fracture during walking, coughing, or bathing. Doctors recommend mild exercise to strengthen bones, a balanced diet with foods high in calcium, and, in some cases, surgery or hormone replacement therapy.
Online
2010
33.

Keeping Your Back Healthy [electronic resource]

Most people experience back pain at some point in their lives. In fact, back pain is one of today's most common health problems. Normal aging and certain physically demanding occupations tend to cause spinal discs to wear out. Bad posture and poor movement patterns can speed up that process. This program describes the care and proper balance needed for lifting heavy objects. Providing clear instructions and showing model techniques to help avoid strain and injury, the video is especially relevant for seniors. Topics include the correct posture for proper support, large and small muscles, reaching and twisting, and easy-to-remember tips.
Online
2010
34.

Low Back Pain [electronic resource]

It bothers-and sometimes debilitates-an estimated 80 percent of Americans at some time during their adult lives. And low back pain shows no sign of going away, despite current research into its causes and potential cures. This program examines the ongoing health issue through case studies, interviews with medical experts, and animated graphics showing spinal anatomy, movement, and conditions. Highlighting the major factors that contribute to low back pain, the program discusses the different levels of the disorder-acute, recurrent, and chronic-and a variety of treatments, including physical therapy, epidural steroid injections, and both compression and fusion surgery.
Online
2006; 2005
35.

Learning About Rheumatoid Arthritis [electronic resource]

This program provides a detailed look at how rheumatoid arthritis appears, progresses, and responds to treatment. It also features case studies that demonstrate the potential dangers of RA while outlining new therapies that have noticeably reduced the effects of the disease. Helpful animation sequences shed light on how rheumatoid arthritis attacks a joint's synovial membrane, while Dr. Salahuddin Kazi of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Dr. Kathryn Hobbs of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center explain the RA diagnostic process-including anti-CCP blood testing-and the importance of "biologics" that battle tumor necrosis factor.
Online
2006; 2003
36.

Living With Rheumatoid Arthritis [electronic resource]

Rheumatoid arthritis can ravage the human body if not treated in time, but there is good news. This program explores medical innovations that are improving the quality of life for patients with advanced RA. Case studies profile patients who have resumed active lives after struggling with pain and fatigue for years. Renowned RA experts-including Dr. Steven Paget of Cornell University's Weill School of Medicine and Dr. Alvin Wells, director of the Rheumatology and Immunotherapy Center in Oak Creek, Wisconsin-explain the use of TNF alpha inhibitors and groundbreaking MRI and ultrasound applications that are helping to fight the battle against RA.
Online
2006; 2003
37.

Living With Arthritis [electronic resource]

One out of three American adults suffers from arthritis or related joint pain. This program examines the widespread affliction and the treatment protocols for it. Explaining the difference between arthritis pain and the natural stiffness of aging, the program describes the early warning signs of the disease, demonstrates its impact when left untreated, and details treatment options. Expert medical commentary is provided by Dr. John Klimkeiwicz of Georgetown Medical Center, Dr. John Bruno of the Tennessee Orthopedic Alliance, and Dr. Wayne Goldstein of the Illinois Bone and Joint Institute-the creator of sophisticated joint implants that have given arthritis sufferers unprecedented mobility.
Online
2007; 2005
38.

Shameless [electronic resource]: Art of Disability

What does it mean to be disabled and how does it shape an artist's work? This documentary explores what is known as the disability art movement, following five artists-including a painter, a writer, an actor, a theater director, and a filmmaker, all of whom happen to have physical disabilities-through their creative work. Intense group discussions of artistic and personal goals are also recorded. Dispelling the myth of tragic disability, the film depicts its subjects as, first and foremost, creative people. The result is a profound look at, and celebration of, the act of making art-viewed through the lens of disability and the rejection of its stereotypes.
Online
2007; 2006
39.

New Weapons to Fight Multiple Sclerosis [electronic resource]

Doctors and researchers have new tools to better identify, study, and treat the brain and spinal cord lesions that cause MS. This program enters an MRI lab and presents informative case studies as it reveals state-of-the-art developments in the battle against MS. Topics include the four types of MS, MRI diagnosis and monitoring, sclerotic scars, and cognitive rehabilitation. Viewers will also learn about the Epstein-Barr Trigger Theory, T- and B-cell immunology, genetic aspects of MS, and drugs to reduce the frequency and severity of MS symptoms-some FDA-approved, others still in development. Medical commentary is provided by doctors affiliated with the University at Buffalo (SUNY) and Florida International University.
Online
2009; 2008
40.

Deadly Calcium [electronic resource]: Science Behind a Major Health Threat

Research into the pathology of calcification is building momentum. This program follows the work of scientists and physicians dedicated to the study of calcium in the human body-including how and why it accumulates to fatal levels and how diseases linked to calcification can be prevented, treated, or cured. Science journalist Douglas Mulhall introduces the basic issues; Dr. Clarke Anderson of the University of Kansas Medical Center describes his groundbreaking 1967 discovery concerning matrix vesicles and calcification; and Dr. Catherine Shanahan of King's College London explains recent findings that micro-particles are released by living as well as dead cells. Case studies are included.
Online
2009; 2008