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21.

OBQI Through the Use of Clinical Pathways [electronic resource]

Under the Outcome-Based Quality Improvement system, quality of care is measured using the most effective and relevant benchmark available - patient outcome data. This program shows how the principles of OBQI apply to individual patient care and to developing an understanding of the patient's specific needs. It explains how restorative nursing techniques and complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) fit into the equation of patient care, while also helping to clarify the relationship between clinical pathways and a specific diagnosis. Diseases and disorders used to illustrate the episode's concepts include Parkinson's disease, diabetes, COPD, and clinical depression.
Online
2003
22.

Esophageal Cancer [electronic resource]

In the past, esophageal cancer was linked to heavy smoking and drinking, but recent research points to a new culprit: acid reflux. This program examines the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of esophageal cancer. Case studies and commentary from leading medical experts in the field elucidate the causal chain between age; obesity; gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD; and Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. Gastroenterologists also discuss how long-term use of over-the-counter and prescription antacids can mask important warning signs of this disease.
Online
2009; 2007
23.

Sinusitis [electronic resource]

Although sinusitis affects some 30 million Americans each year, its frequent appearance alongside the common cold can make for a difficult diagnosis. This program illustrates the causes of sinusitis, assesses various treatments for it, and highlights two sinusitis case studies. Viewers discover how pollution, allergies, and dehydration are all linked to the ailment and how it presents as an infection blocking the sinus passages. Also discussed are the differences between acute, subacute, and chronic sinusitis, as well as the treatment options now available, including saline and steroid sprays, antibiotics, and endoscopic surgery. Expert commentary comes from Dr. Thomas Troost of the Washington ENT Group; Dr. Suzette Mikula of Georgetown University Hospital; and Dr. Harvey Plasse, coa [...]
Online
2009; 2007
24.

Skin Cancer [electronic resource]

In this program, Dr. Kevin Soden, along with Johns Hopkins dermatologist Rebecca Kazin, provides an overview of the causes, detection, and treatment of skin cancer. In a question-and-answer session, they explore the ABCD&Es of skin cancer detection as well as some of the common myths about sun exposure. Additionally, Dr. Kazin discusses with Dr. Soden the three major types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Finally, Dr. Kazin explains to viewers the importance, and the process, of performing skin self-exams, how to protect the skin from harmful UVA and UVB rays, and the procedures used by dermatologists to remove cancerous cells from the skin.
Online
2009; 2007
25.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome [electronic resource]

Sometimes, the normal aches and pains of the aging process can indicate a more serious underlying medical condition. This program focuses on the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of one such condition: carpal tunnel syndrome. Host Dr. Kevin Soden discusses how CTS arises and its diagnosis with hand surgeon Ken Means, while physical therapist Steve Moxie explains the various treatment options for patients diagnosed with the disorder. The patient's point of view is provided through two senior citizens who underwent laparoscopic surgery to ease the chronic hand pain caused by the syndrome. Although serious at any age, CTS is highly treatable.
Online
2009; 2007
26.

Taste and Smell Disorders [electronic resource]

Most people lose some olfactory sense as they approach old age, but the problem can also impact the lives of young or middle-aged adults and require extensive medical treatment. This program examines the causes of smell and taste loss, surveys various treatments for it, and presents several case studies of the unhappy condition. Viewers learn about the basic functions of the olfactory nerve; the various types of smell and taste loss, including phantosmia, or hallucinated smells; and the array of diagnostic and treatment options available-from a clinical scratch-and-sniff test to endoscopic surgery. Expert guests include Dr. Eric Holbrook, a sinus surgeon and Harvard Medical School professor; Dr. Alan Hirsch, neurological director at Chicago's Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foun [...]
Online
2009; 2007
27.

Preventing Falls in Aged Care [electronic resource]

Although falls can happen to anyone of any age group, they are undoubtedly more common in the elderly population. This program examines the risk factors for falls, illustrating cases in which falls can be avoided, while helping viewers to implement preventative strategies tailored to elderly care. Formalized fall-prevention programs are highlighted in different settings. Showing that the causes of falls are multi-factorial in nature, the video calls for an approach which encompasses accurate identification of risks and effective vicinity management.
Online
2010; 2009
28.

Zoonotic Viruses [electronic resource]

Rabies, Lyme disease, West Nile virus-all are examples of zoonosis, an infection that can be transmitted to humans from animals. In this program, several experts discuss major zoonotic diseases of concern, as well as outline safety tips for both people and pets. Dr. Wendy Walker, president of the Maryland Veterinary Medical Association; Joe Conlon, medical entomologist with the American Mosquito Control Association; and Dr. Michael Zimring, director of the Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Baltimore's Mercy Medical Center, talk about risk factors, symptoms, prevention, and treatment.
Online
2010; 2007
29.

Teens and Tanning [electronic resource]: Sun Safety Update

This Telly Award-winning video outlines the dangers of overexposure to the sun, gearing its message toward teens of all backgrounds and ethnic groups who mistakenly think, "The more sun I get, the better I'll look." Dermatologist Carolyn Jacob explains what happens to the skin during sun exposure, describes different types of skin cancers, warns against the dangers of tanning beds, and offers tips on staying sun-safe. Correlates to all applicable National and State Educational Standards including the NCLB Act.
Online
2010; 2005
30.

Brain Fitness2 [electronic resource]: Sight and Sound

As people get older, the information they receive from their eyes and ears becomes degraded and the brain's ability to make sense of that information slows, putting elderly people in jeopardy of losing their independence. But what if a person could do something to dramatically improve his or her senses and cognitive abilities? This program, specifically designed to help people get the most from their vision and hearing as they age, considers how the eyes and ears change throughout life and explains what people can do to keep them healthy and fully functional.
Online
2008
31.

Real Life Teens: Sexual Responsibility [electronic resource]

After watching this video, viewers will have a better understanding of what sexual responsibility means, as well as possible undesirable outcomes of reckless sexual activity. Subjects covered include sexual activity in the teen years, the dangers of unprotected sex, how sexually transmitted diseases spread, potential consequences of having many sex partners, syphilis and HIV/AIDS, and emotional and monetary ramifications of teen pregnancy.
Online
2008
32.

Pieces of Me [electronic resource]: The Preemptive Mastectomy Dilemma

Three Australian sisters have tested positive for BRCA2, an inherited gene disorder putting them at high risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer before age 50. This program follows them as they confront an arduous decision: whether to remove their breasts now while they are young and healthy or wait in fear for the disease to present itself. The film reveals the toll breast cancer can take while putting a human face on the impact of accelerating advances in genetic identification. Although new tests are saving lives, cures and treatments lag far behind or come only in the form of unthinkable procedures - as in the case of one sister who opts for a full prophylactic mastectomy. The other two struggle further with the decision-making process, in the shadow of their mother's own can [...]
Online
2008
33.

Dangerous Infections [electronic resource]

Health care-associated infections are getting a lot of profile in the hospital environment and rightfully so, says Peter Angood of The Joint Commission, a health care accreditation organization. "That's where the sickest patients come, that's where the most antibiotics are used, that's where the resistances begin to emerge." This program provides guidelines for people to follow when prescribed an antibiotic and explains ways that inpatients can lower the risk of contracting a hospital-acquired infection. The video also illustrates measures being taken by hospital personnel to keep their patients safe.
Online
2008
34.

Deadly Blood Clots [electronic resource]: The Dangers of Venous Thromboembolism

When part of a deep vein thrombosis breaks up and lodges in the lungs, it becomes a pulmonary embolism-manifestations of the dual-stage condition known as venous thromboembolism. In this program, Richard Friedman, of Charleston Orthopaedic Associates, South Carolina; Stephan Moll, of the University of North Carolina; Jack Ansell, of Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan; and Alan Brownstein, of the National Alliance for Thrombosis and Thrombophilia, examine the symptoms and risk factors of DVT and PE, identify who should be tested for clotting disorders, and touch upon treatments ranging from anticoagulants and thrombolytic agents, to an abdominal filter, to surgery.
Online
2009
35.

New Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes [electronic resource]

With more than a million Americans diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year, it would be reasonable to think that a standard set of treatments has emerged to address the epidemic. But, as this program reports, the treatments available for people with type 2 diabetes vary according to their specific, individual needs. With the help of case studies and expert commentary, the video covers general symptoms that the disease may or may not present, how it can go undetected for years, and how it is typically, if belatedly, diagnosed. While highlighting preventive strategies, the film also illustrates the importance of effective management of type 2 diabetes and the best strategies for doing so. Guests include Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes and Dr. Anne Pe [...]
Online
2009
36.

Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Risk [electronic resource]

An increase in body weight has been associated with more than 60 chronic illnesses, says Louis Aronne, M.D., one of the world's foremost experts in obesity and author of the best-seller The Skinny. In this program, Dr. Aronne and other medical experts examine the links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease through case studies involving four middle-age patients-three male and one female. In addition, they discuss the importance of active patient participation in the management of diabetes through dietary planning, exercise, self-monitoring, and taking prescribed medication.
Online
2010
37.

Winning the Battle Against Prostate Cancer [electronic resource]

The treatment of prostate cancer is controversial: recommendations range from removal of the gland, which some patients fear more than the disease itself, to active surveillance, meaning no treatment at all. This program sorts through the medical options for men with prostate cancer by introducing three patients, each of whom chose a different plan of attack-prostatectomy, radioactive seed implants, and testosterone reduction-when he was diagnosed. The men discuss the basis for their decisions, with medical experts lending insight into these and other modalities. The importance of patients educating themselves about the best response to prostate cancer is emphasized.
Online
2007
38.

Living With Diabetes [electronic resource]

About every five years people predict how many new cases of diabetes there will be in the future, says Dr. John Buse, "and every one of those predictions has fallen short." With more than 15 million Americans already diagnosed, this program aims to educate viewers about the causes and management of diabetes, focusing especially on type 2. Patients talk candidly about the difficult but necessary step of cutting back on foods that exacerbate the disorder, and how they've made exercise part of their daily routine. The importance of monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol along with glucose levels is also emphasized. Includes commentary from Dr. Steven Edelman and other experts.
Online
2007
39.

Osteoarthritis [electronic resource]

Dolores relies on synovial fluid injections and physical therapy to overcome the osteoarthritis that at one time put an end to her hiking. George, diagnosed with degenerative arthritis, opted for hip replacement surgery before returning to the ski slopes. A new set of knees was the answer for Del, after having suffered a series of sports injuries while in college. In this program viewers are introduced to the risk factors, symptoms, and treatments of osteoarthritis, with a special look at how the disorder affects people with an active lifestyle. Commentary from medical experts rounds out this video about the number one disabling disease for people over the age of forty.
Online
2007
40.

Hepatitis B [electronic resource]: After Diagnosis

Most patients with untreated hepatitis B show no symptoms until liver damage has already taken a toll. This program highlights the importance for those at risk to overcome the perceived stigma of the disease and be tested for or vaccinated against it. Routes of transmission, its prevalence among Asian Americans (nearly one in ten are HBV-positive), the possibility of cirrhosis if treatment is avoided, and the pharmaceuticals used to control HBV are all covered, with input from both patients and physicians. Dr. Tom Tran of the Asian Pacific Health Center addresses the sometimes-prohibitive cost of therapy and the work his center does to help the uninsured receive care.
Online
2007